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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (July-December 1900)"

Library 

of the 

University of Toronto 



FLUMBERS UJNVENTION NUMBERr 



NOT FICTITIOUS 

NOR EXORBITANT.— Use 
Langwell's Babbitt. Montreal. 



frC ARABIA JT. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. Xll. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO JULY 7, 1900. 



NO. 27 



•TIUEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



Th'- M'lat Econamioal. 
Tin beast Wearing. 
Tne Most Durable. 
Friction Preventing, 



'Tandem" Metals are belter than 
any other lor their purpose. 
and are, therefore : 

listsnoe Reducing. 
Journal Preserving 
Power Increasing 
Lubricant Savin.' 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed, 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUQH & McNAUOHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

, <t st smelters of A nti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metuh in Europe. 




CANADIAN PLUMBERS 

AND METAL WORKERS 

ARE LEVEL HEADED. 

They know that for thirty years or more one brand 
of Galvanized Iron has been on the market which has 
always stood their tests, which is galvanized as per- 
fectly and rolled as flat and as uniform in weight as 
iron can be. Therefore, they almost always specify 
" Queen's Head " brand as their first choice. 

A copy of our handsome and useful display card sent free 
to any consumer, dealer, or architect, who asks for it. 



\ 



JOHN LYSA6HT, 

Limited, Makers, 

BRISTOL, EN6. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

MONTREAL, 

Managers Canadian Branch. 



)^m&mmmmm^mmmmm^^^^^mmmmmm^mmm^^mm^mmmm^ 





Y «e^2om "knocks twice at a man's door — the man 
lo called on you yesterday for advice as to the best 

Ladiator to install in his house gave you the oppor- 
tunity to make a big advertisement for yourself and 
your store. Did you suggest the " Safford " Radiator 
for Steam or Hot Water Heating? The "Safford" 
absolutely cannot leak, you know. 

This interests you, of course — now, let us send 
our illustrated Booklet to you telling all about our 
original invention in screw-threaded nipple connections 
which has made the "Safford" famous all over the world. Some of Canada's 
largest buildings are fitted throughout with the "Safford," and that's an endorse- 
ment of their perfection that we're proud of. Twenty-five different styles — plain 
or ornamental — to fit circles, curves, angles. Here's your " opportunity " — will you 
take advantage of it ? 



/ 



I 



The Dominion Radiator Company, Limited, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



The 

Safford 

Radiators. 



^€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€#€€#€€€€##€€€€#€€€€€:€€€#' 



Fishing Tackle 



MMMMMM 



TROLLING LINES 
RODS and REELS 
BAIT PAILS 
HOOKS 
LANDING NETS 
DISGORGERS, Etc. 



Sporting Goods 



t l t ll tDHH 



BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

GOLFING 

TENNIS 

CRICKET 

QUOITS 



U 
P 

P 

L 
I 

E 
S 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Sts., 



INI 



^nfnfmmmwmmmwmmmwmmmmmmwmmnfmmntmwmmmmmmmmmmfmm^ 



I 

& 
% 



THE 



Abbott-Mitchell 



I 



Iron and Steel Company 1 



3 
3 



OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 



Manufacturers of 



3 



fiar /ro/? and Steel 
Nails, Spikes 
Horse Shoes . . 
Bolts, Washers, etc. 



Belleville, 3 
Ontario. I 



^ 
3 



ft&UUttlttlUlUUUUJUi^^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



1000-MILE 

AXLE 
GREASE 



IS 
THE 



Put up in 1-lb. boxes and 
3, 5 and 10-lb. pails. 

SEHSTHD ZFOIR PEICE LIST. 

AWWWWWWWWWI 

The Campbell Mfg. Co. 

FORT ERIE, ONT. 



THRESHING 
BELTS 











with these brands 
insure the best 
of wear for the 
money. 



The Canadian Rubber 
Co. of Montreal, 



**4 




MONTREAL, ^\„^^ 
TORONTO, ^ X C*V 
WINNIPEG. '^!>.«/M!«V> vC ^' 




*<£ 



SOME OF THE NEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




NO. 41 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN HANDLE. 




NO. 42 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN BOX. 




X 




NO. 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, FOR WOOD OR METALS. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



* »•* 



Plymouth Twine. 

For years it has been the aim to improve and 
maintain the high standard of " PLYMOUTH," 
as experience teaches that it pays to make the best. 
If you handle this famous twine once, you will 
sell no other make. 

Prudent People Prefer "Plymouth." 



IT PAYS TO BUY 
THE BEST. 




This Trade Mark Is 
on every Tag. 



MMMIIIIM 



DISTRIBUTERS: 



PLYMOUTH BINDER TWINE AGENCY, 



54 Bay Street, TORONTO. 



Galvanized Sheets 



"Gordon Crown" 



And. 



" Apollo." 



From Stock or Import. Enquiries Solicited. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



ENGLISH HOUSE: 

164 FENCHURCH ST., EC, 

LONDON., ENG. 



27 Wellington St. W., 



TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ICE CREAM FREEZERS 



« 



• The Latest 
and Best. 

The 

Ideal" 



will make cream in two 
to five minutes, accord- 
ing to quantity. 

SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 
VERY RAPID 
ECONOMICAL 



Write for Circular and 
Prices. 




Wood, Vallance & Co., mbm 



Branch House : George D. Wood & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto Office : 88 York Street— H. T. Eager. 




WOOD. VALLANCE 4 CO.. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



GEO. D. WOOD & CO., 

Iron Merchants 

Importers of British and Foreign 

HARDWARE. 

WINNIPEG, Canada. 



CORDAGE . . 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 



Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables and 



Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"FIRMUS" 
Orders will 



Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila hemp obtainable, 
not be accepted for second quality or "mixed" goods. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



Toronto Branch 27 FRONT ST. WEST. 
TIL. 94. Wm. B. Stewart, Agent. 



Montreal, Que. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LocKerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



WESTERN 

XX ACCIlDAMl 



Incorporated 

1851. 



ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital, subscribed $2,000,000.00 

Capital - - - 1,000,000.00 

Assets, over - - 2,340,000.00 

Annual Income - 2,290,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-Presideni. 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 



ECONOMY GASOLINE STOVES 



AND 



QUICK=BAKER OVENS 

are especially well adapted for baking, ironing, etc., in summer, 
and always give perfect satisfaction. 

No Dust. No Dirt. 
.No Ashes. No Waste. 
No Discomfort. 




The Quick-Baker oven is adapted for use on gas, 
gasoline, or coal oil stoves. 



10 pounds bread baked 
for 1 cent. 

8 dozen biscuits baked 
for 1 cent. 



THE TRADE CAN MAKE MONEY HANDLING THESE GOODS. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



The Cannom Stove & Oven Co., Limited 

197 King St., LONDON, ONT. 



THE AUER GASOLINE 
LAMP 



100 CANDLE-POWER. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR 
MONEY REFUNDED. 

Approved by Canadian Fire Under- 
writers' Association. 



Send-for Catalogue. 



NO. 5 
PRICE $7.00. 



AUER 
LIGHT 
CO., 

MONTREAL. 




...Defiance 

Cold 

Blast 

Lantern 




With Patent Fluted 

Plate, by which the air is 
admitted so as to come in 
contact with the Globe, so 
tending to keep it cool. 

Sold by Leading 
Jobbers. 



Manufactured by. 



W. W. CHOWN & CO. 



Belleville, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 









. . FULL STOCK . ■ 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



r 



It Won't Peel 
or Rub off. 

Church's Alabastine for ihe walls and ceilings of your 
rooms is absolutely permanent. It won't peel and you 
cannot rub it off. Wall papers often contain poisono, 
matter, and Kalsomines decay, but Alabastine gr 
harder with age. 

you can apply it yourself if you do not ' 

employ a painter. Cold water and a brush and a lijtl 

mil skill is all that is needed. Ask your dealer 
show you the card of sixteen beautiful tints (and w 
It is never sold in bulk. Church's 



Alabastine 



For 
Walls. 



Free to anyone thai will mention this paper a forty-n ve page 
book (The Decorator's Aid . It gives valuable Information about 
wall und celling decorating. 



u 



The Alabastine Co., Limited, 
Paris, Ontario. 
I'raile In the Northwest supplied by 

G. F. Stephens & Co , - Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver Hardware Co., Vancouver, B C. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 



"MAXWELL FAVORITE CHURN" 

PATENT ED FEATURES : Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive. 

I AWN MnWPRS, ™» " d i. Lo T. w K: 

LHllll 111 U If LIU. widths Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Cruci- 
ble Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 



In Four different sizes. 



Steel Frame Churn 



If your Wholesale House does not 
offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 




MAXWELL MOWER 



8-inch Low Wheel 



Wood Frame Churn. 

"THE MAXWELL" Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Elastic Carbon Paint 

A BIG THING, LOOK INTO IT. 



r (ARBON 

. QpAitir 

^Atlantic 
Refining Co. 

TORONTO 



II 






#/# 



— ' " * m 

WILL NOT CPACK.RUN.' 
~BUSTER OR SCALER 



ONT. 



JVJ LLSTOP LEAKS AND * 

AdSTA~LIFE TIMEp 
-^ G/?EAr PBOTF * 
£0# £V£J?YTH/N G__ 



f^-£W ^lilEJ?Yrr/JS fg_ 



JQOOS? OAL 



We are shipping large quantities of this Paint ail over the Dominion, and 
are daily receiving many repeat orders and voluntary testimonials similar to the 
ones below : 

The Atlantic Refining Co., Toronto, Ont. Marmora, June 19, 1900. 

Dear Sirs : — I some time ago purchased from you a quantity of your Elastic Carbon Paint, and am pleased to say 
that its use has been quite satisfactory and proved to be all that you claimed for it. I used it on a galvanized iron roof that 
had been leaking for years, and our tinsmith could not find the leaks. I then painted it with Oxide of Iron, which proved but 
of little use. I then used Coal Tar with no better results, and last Fall I put on two coats of your Elastic Carbon Paint, 
according to directions, and it has been perfectly tight ever since. Yours truly, 

J. W. PEARCE. 

The Atlantic Refining Co., Toronto, Ont. Trenton, June 27, 1900. 

Dear Sirs : — We have handled your Elastic Carbon Paint for some time and have given it some severe tests on old 
roofs, and in all our experience in roofing paints, it far excels anything we have ever used for Canvas Covers, Buggy Tops, 
and Iron Bridges. We find it will outwear any paint on the market that has ever come within our observation. Wishing 
you every success in your trade, we are, Yours truly, 

COLBOURN & WILLIAMSON. 

The Atlantic Refining Co., Toronto, Ont. Picton, May 31, 1900. 

Dear Sirs : — It gives me pleasure to testify to the good qualities of your Elastic Carbon Paint. I have used it on 
several old tin roofs in this place, and have no hesitation in stating that it is just what every person wants for an old tin roof, 
or, in fact, for nearly every kind of a roof. In this day and age it is almost impossible to get goods up to what they are 
guaranteed, but none need fear your Elastic Carbon Paint, but what it will do all you claim for it. 

Yours truly, 

I. N. WAITE. 



Made Only By. . . 



PRICES, SAMPLES AND ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED. 



The Atlantic Refining Co. 

Manufacturers and Importers of High-Grade American Illuminating and 
Lubricating Oils, Greases and Specialties. 



Cor. Jarvis and Esplanade Streets, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MOORE BROS. 



LIMITED. 



REC.hlHltl 



TfJADF MARK 



BRASS and IRON 

FOUNDERS 

Birmingham, England. 




8395 



8Z73 



The original and sole manufacturers of the M.B. patent 
finished electro-brassed goods. Note the "Beehive" trade 
mark, and beware of imitations. 

All goods put up in cardboard boxes. 

Samples or illustrated lists free on application. 



E W. B. Snider. 

W. W. Snider. Vice-Pres 

II. Wi Anthea, Manager, Secy, and Treas. 



Toronto Foundry Co. 



LIMITED 



AAAAAAAAAAAA AA -*- A AAAAAA A.A.A.A -*--A--*-A- AAAAAAAA a -*- aa 
▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ 



Manufacturers of 



•♦ Soil Pipe and Fittings j 
S: Sinks and | 

Boiler Stands j 

h^AA 4AAAAAAAA4AAAAAAA4AAAAA4AAAAAAAAAAAAAaI 
W^WW TTTTTTTTvTTTTTTvTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT 



Telephone 5335. 



T ORONTO 



THE SPRING TRADE 



+ *** 

* + * + 

* + ** 

* + **» 




To secure thoroughly reliable goods send 
your orders for 

Ready-Mixed House and Floor Paints, 
Varnishes, Japans, Coach Colors, 
White Lead, Colored Paints, Enamels, 
Wood Stains, Wall Tints, Putty, etc. 



T» Henderson & Potts, 



NOVA SCOTIA PAINT AND 

VARNISH WORKS, 



HALIFAX, and 747 Craig St.. MONTREAL. 



Sole Agents for the 
Dominion for 



Brandram's Celebrated White Lead. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




EVERY HEATING QUESTION 



using one of our. 



sx/ 



WITH 



STEAM BOILERS 
OXFORD RADIATORS 

Made either for Hot Water or Steam. They offer a range of capacity to suit buildings 

of all classes and sizes. 

BRIGHT IDEA Safety Water Tube Boilers are unequalled for large work — they are 
made in 8 sizes — use almost any kind of fuel — have small castings — an enormous heating 
surface — and are preeminent for durable efficiency. 

DORIC BOILERS are seamless — made from one single cored casting, without joints — in 7 sizes — use any kind of fuel, 
and give unvarying economical satisfaction. 

OXFORD BOILERS for hard or soft coal — are made in 1 1 sizes — are extra economical with fuel, and have mechanical 
features of highest improved excellence. 

Catalogues, prices, and fullest information on application. 

We are now prepared to give estimates on all kinds of Steam Fittings — let us have your specifications. 



Bright Idea Steam Boiler. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 



TOIROILTTO 



THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO, LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



"v^^nsr c o uve :r 



KEMP'S STEEL SINKS 

Are stamped from Cold Sheet Steel and are Unbreakable. 

They are strong, yet light, which means that you 
will have less freight to pay on them than on the heavy 
cumbersome cast sinks. Every one is neatly and 
smoothly finished. They are provided with strainers 
and connections with brass bolts, which cannot rust out. 
They are made in three styles of finish : 

PAINTED, GALVANIZED AND ENAMELED. 




3 Sizes 



16 x 24 Inch. 
18x30 " 
18 x 36 " 



WE WILL BE PLEASED TO NAME YOU PRICES. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



Toronto, 
Canada. 




Vol. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 7, 1900. 



No. 27 



President, 

|OHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES 

MONTREAL - - - . Board of Trade Building, 

Telephone 1355. 

TORONTO »6 Front Street West, 

Telephone 1148. 
LONDON, ENO. - - - - 109 Fleet Street, E.C., 

J. M. McKim. 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. - - - 18 St Ann Street, 

H. S. Ashburaer. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N. B. ... No. 3 Market Wharf. 

I. Hunter White. 

NEW YORK. 150 Nassau Street, 

Edwin H. Haven. 

Travelling Subscription Agents : 

T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 

Subscription Canada, $2.00 Great Britain, 93.00 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Addre.»{Adscri Pp t,London_ 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



TRADE MARK ON CANADIAN MANU- 
FACTURED GOODS. 

AT the annual convention of the 
National Association of Master 
Plumbers and Steamfitters of 
Canada, held in Montreal last week, Presi- 
dent Harris urged Canadian manufacturers 
J to place a trade mark on their products. 
A few already do put a trade mark on their 
products, but the vast majority do not. 

There are, therefore, a large number of 
manufacturers to whom Mr. Harris' sug- 
gestion can be submitted for consideration. 
And it is to be hoped they will give it the 
consideration it deserves. 

The suggestion was born of no empty 



desire. It was born of a desire to handle 
the product of Canadian factories in prefer- 
ence to that of any other country. 

An article that is worth making is worth 
making well, and an article that is well 
made should certainly bear a trade mark 
that will distinguish it from the product of 
another factory, either domestic or foreign. 

A trade mark, like the Government stamp 
on a coin, Is a guarantee of its goodness. 

There are firms to day in Great Britain 
who have been in business for two and three 
hundred years whose trade mark is the 
medium that sells their goods. And in the 
competition that they are meeting with to- 
day their policy is not to directly advertise 
their goods, but to advertise their trade 
mark — to impress it upon the people so that 
they, when purchasing, will look for that 
firm's particular mark. 

Where there are so many firm names, 
and often so many of them near alike, there 
is apt to be confusion or misunderstanding, 
but with trade marks it is different. People, 
as a rule, remember trade marks. 

The question of trade marks is well worth 
the consideration of the Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association. 



much firmer, and it is reasonable to antici- 
pate that prices will be higher before a great 
while. 



SITUATION IN PARIS GREEN. 

After being sluggish for some time the 
trade for paris green has been suddenly 
galvanized into life by the invasion of the 
potato bug, which is appearing in some 
districts in overwhelming numbers, and 
the demand for paris green is almost 
unprecedented. 

As the "visible supply" of this insecticide 
is somewhat limited quotations are now 



A SCHEME TO CATCH FISH AND 
ATTRACT VISITORS 

LAKE Maskinonge, in the Province of 
Quebec, affords excellent maskinonge 
fishing, as its name naturally implies. 
This fact the citizens of St. Gabriel de 
Brandon, which is situated on the shores of 
that lake, are making a special and 
somewhat unique effort to have better 
known. They have decided to offer four 
prizes for the largest maskinonge caught 
between July i and September 30. The 
prizes range from #20 to $5, and, while the 
contest is confined to residents of Montreal, 
citizens of all cities and countries, too, are 
invited to come and fish. 

The citizens of St. Gabriel de Brandon 
are to be commended for their enterprise. 
But, their action should be not without 
interest to the citizens of other towns in 
Canada. 

There may be, perhaps, but few towns or 
villages in Canada which are as favorably 
situated as St. Gabriel de Brandon as far as 
maskinonge fishing is concerned, but there 
are a great many others which afford just as 
good, and to some people, no doubt, still 
greater attractions to sportsmen and tourists. 
The difficulty, however, is that even as 
little effort as the people of St. Gabriel are 
exercising has not been called into play. 

Local attractions bring visitors and visitors 
bring money, while the merchants sell their 
goods and enjoy the profits resulting there- 
from. The lesson to business men is 
obvious. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



EFFICIENT SANITARY LAWS WANTED. 



ONE of the subjects that came in for 
a great deal of attention at the 
recent convention, in Montreal, of 
the National Association of Master Plumbers 
and Steamfitters of Canada, was that of 
efficient laws for the regulation of plumbing 
in order that the public health may be pro- 
perly safeguarded. 

It is not a great many years since plumb- 
ing was plumbing all the world over. Those 
who coupled bad plumbing with bad health 
were few, and those who considered 
plumbing as a sanitary science were fewer 
still. 

Of course, now everybody who thinks or 
reads knows that the health of whole com ■ 
munities, let alone that of individuals, de- 
pends a great deal upon the character of the 
plumbing. Bad plumbing in one dwelling 
is quite equal to the task of making certain 
diseases epidemic. 

But, while this knowledge is so general 
that no sensible man ever questions it, the 
laws for the prevention of unsanitary plumb- 
ing are still comparatively crude, and even 
the validity of some that we have are 
decidedly in question. For instance, in 
Ottawa an agitation has been going on for 
years for the creation of an efficient by-law 
for the regulation of plumbing. A few 
months ago it was thought the desideratum 
had been secured, but the city solicitor of that 
municipality is out with a letter to the effect 
that the by-law recently passed is ultra 
vires. " The section," he says, " of the 
Municipal Act which authorizes the passing 
of a by-law by council for the licensing and 
regulation of plumbers only has the effect of 
conferring on council authority to make such 
regulations as will prevent unqualified per- 
sons from working at the trade, but does not 
extend so far as to permit council to pass by- 
laws regulating the construction of build- 
ings." 

It is evident to even the veriest tyro in 
sanitary science that a law which allows a 
municipality to go no farther than to create 
a bylaw to "prevent unqualified persons 
from working at the trade " is not a suffi- 
cient guarantee for buildings being put in a 
proper sanitary condition. 

It is to be regretted that the National 
Association of Master Plumbers had not 



more time at its disposal to go more 
thoroughly into this question of more effi- 
cient sanitary laws, so that a vigorous 
campaign might have been carried on 
between this and the next convention. 
In the meantime, the executive committee 
should try and secure an opinion from 
the best legal authority procurable as 
to the respective powers of the Provincial 
Legislature and of the Dominion Parliament 
to enact laws of the kind desired, and then 
agitate until the same are secured. 



IMPROVEMENTS IN TELEPHONES. 

We are repeatedly receiving information 
from European continental countries regard- 
ing the cheapening of telephone rates there. 
This cheapening of rates does not, however, 
appear to retard improvements in the sys- 
tems. On the contrary, they are evidently 
an incentive to devising improvements. 

In a recent report to his Government at 
Washington, the United States consul at 
Munich, Germany, gives a brief outline of 
an interesting improvement in that country. 

By this improvement it is possible to 
retain the spoken word and to repeat it as 
freely as desired ; to use the same wire for 
simultaneous conversation by different 
parties ; to repeat the same conversation at 
various points, and to strengthen the sounds 
so as to make the long distance telephones 
operate with better results. 

In Canada our telephone rates are increas- 
ing but no improvements are being made 
in the system, as those who find it necessary 
to use the telephone for business purposes 
know to their cost. 



ROOM FOR THE PERSEVERING. 

If genius as ordinarily understood was the 
necessary qualification for success in life, 
those to whom success were possible would 
be few indeed. 

But success is not dependent on genius. 
It is dependent upon perseverance. 

Genius a man can do without and be 
successful ; but perseverance he cannot. 

No man, therefore, should be discouraged 
because he is not a genius. If he has per- 
severance coupled with common sense he is 
sure to have a successful career. 

Let him aim at the vocation for which he 
is best adapted, and success will come just 



as certain as to-morrow's sunrise. Per- 
severance that is practised under all circum- 
stances is like the mountain stream — always 
going ahead. 

IRON PIPE PRICES PATCHED UP. 

THE unsatisfactory condion of the iron 
pipe trade in Canada has been re- 
ferred to from time to time by Hard- 
ware and Metal during the last month 
or two. It now looks as if a turn for the 
better has been taken. 

The cause of the trouble was largely due 
to the heavy stocks carried by the wholesale 
dealers, and the desire of the latter to 
unload, in the doing of which prices were 
cut to a figure even below that quoted 
by the manufacturers. 

For instance, where the manufacturer's 
price for i inch black pipe was $5.50 per 
100 feet, some of the jobbers have sold as 
low as $5 per 100 feet. Of course, this could 
not go on for a great while ; and the end 
appears to have been at last reached. 

For several weeks an effort has been 
made to bring the jobbers together. Last 
week the effort proved successful, and the 
result is the abolition of the net list and the 
inauguration of a system of discounts. 

The discounts on black pipe are as fol- 
lows : % to y% inch, 40 per cent.; y£ inch, 
60 per cent.; % to 2 inch, 66 2 3 per cent., 
and larger sizes, 50 and 5 per cent. 

On galvanized pipe the discounts are as 
follows : yi, inch, 40 per cent., and % to 
2 inch, 50 per cent. 

These prices are all for carlots f.o.b. 
Montreal. For small lots, 10 per cent, 
additional must be added. 

It is the opinion among the trade that 
there will be an advance in these figures 
before a great while, particularly in view 
of the fact that the United States manufac- 
turers of iron pipe have withdrawn from the 
Canadian market. 

Then the price of pipe in the United 
States is much higher than that in Canada, 
even under the new discounts. For instance- 
according to the figuring of a well-known 
dealer, inch pipe would cost the Canadian 
buyer in carload lots $8.46, while the same 
sized pipe can be bought from the Canadian 
jobber at equal to $5.50 per 100 feet. 

With the improvement in prices has also 
come a slight improvement in the demand, 
although the volume of business is yet by no 
means large. 








The Master Plumbers and Steaj(tt{itters of Canada. 

fatil 
inzs 



Annual Meeting of the National AssoiiatiUlJjrtl Montreal. 
A Report of the Proceedings. 




HE fifth annual 
convention of 
the National 
Association of 
Master Plumb- 
ers, Gas, Steam 
and Hot-water 
Fitters' of the 
Dominion o f 
Canada was 
opened in 

Montreal on June 27, and was continued 

during the two following days. 

It is the second time the convention has 
been held in Montreal, the organization 
meeting having been held there in 1896. 
The second convention was held in Toronto, 
the third in Quebec, the fourth in Ottawa, 
and now the fifth in Montreal. 
} Business began on the morning of the 
27th, but it was confined to the transactions 
of the executive committee. The conven- 
tion proper opened in the afternoon at St. 
Joseph's Hall, St. Catherine street. 

Owing to the executive being in session 
for the purpose of closing up some business 
for presentation to the convention, it was 
3.15 p.m. before President Harris ascended 
the platform and took the chair. 



THE PRESIDENT S WELCOME. 

"Well, gentlemen," he said, as he 
struck the desk, •• I have great pleasure in 
opening this fifth annual convention. As 
president of this association I welcome my 
brethren and hope the work which is going 
to be done by this convention will be of 
great benefit to all members, and, I may 
state, to all plumbers throughout the 
Dominion, and that all the work may prove 
to our confreres that we are not here for fun, 
but for business. We mean to do business. 
If there is any time after business for 
pleasure we will have it. But business first 
and pleasure afterwards. I invite you to do 
as much work as you possibly can and in 
the best way you can." (Applause.) 

Mr. John Watson, Montreal : " Mr. 
President, I move that you be instructed to 
appoint a committee on credentials." 

President Harris: " The first business, 
I think, Mr. Provincial Vice-President, is 
the appointment of a sergeant-at arms. I 
have much pleasure in appointing Mr. F. 
Bonhomme, Montreal, sergeant at-arms." 

On motion of Messrs. John Watson, of 
Montreal, and Mr. Frank Powers, of Lunen- 
burg, N.S., the president was instructed to 
appoint a committee on credentials. 



President Harris : "I will appoint 
Messrs. John McKinley, of Ottawa, Frank 
Powers, Lunenburg, N.S., and R. Ross, of 
Toronto, a committee on credentials." 

A PRO TEM. VICE PRESIDENT. 

Mr. Joseph Wright: "Mr. President, 
while we are waiting for the committee on 
credentials to report, I will move that Mr. 
W. H. Meredith be appointed vice president 
pro tern, in absence of the vice president, 
Mr. Mansell, who is unable to attend the 
convention." 

Mr. H. A. Knox seconded the motion, 
which was carried. 

Someone suggested a speech. Mr. 
Meredith smiled and bowed, but would not 
speak. 

THE OLDEST PLUMBER. 

President Harris : "If the meeting will 
allow me, I will take much pleasure in 
inviting Mr. John Date, the oldest plumber 
in Montreal, if not in the Dominion, to a 
seat on the platform at my right hand." 

Amid much applause, Mr. Date took a 
seat on the platform. 

The President : " Mr. Date is one of 
our first members, and has done much to 
advance the interests of this association." 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Mr. Date: "No flattery, Mr. President." 
Mr. Date has been in Montreal for 56 
years. 

Mr. Meredith pointed out that only such 
associations can be represented by delegates 
as have paid their per capita tax. 

OFFICERS AND DELEGATES PRESENT. 

Mr. Frank Powers presented the report of 
the committee on credentials, showing the 
following officers and delegates present : 

President — ]. W. Harris, Montreal. 

Vice-President (pro tem.) — W. H. Meredith, 
Toronto. 

Secretary — P. C. Ogilvie, Montreal. 

Treasurer — W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

Vice-President of Ontario — H. A. Knox, Ottawa. 

Vice-President of Quebec — John Watson, Mont- 
real. 

Vice-President of Manitoba — R. Ross, Toronto. 

Vice-President of British Columbia — Joseph 
Wright, Toronto. 

Vice-President of Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick — Frank Powers, Lunenburg, N.S. 

Toronto — W. J. McGuire. 

Ottawa — J. McKinley, F. G. Johnston and H. 
Normand. 

Montreal — James A. Giroux, G. C. Denman, 
J. A. Sadler, Joseph Gibeau, Thos. Moll, J. W. 
Hughes and Joseph Lamarche. 

Windsor— P. C. Ogilvie. 

Halifax— Frank S. Power and John McFatridge. 

On motion of Messrs. Meredith and 
Wright, the report was received. 

Messrs. A. Purdy and W. Mashinter were 
to have been in attendance as delegates from 
Toronto, but they were prevented at the last 
moment from being present. 

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS. 

President Harris : "I would suggest 
that someone move that a committee be 
appointed on resolutions." 

Messrs. H. A. Knox and James A. Sadler 
moved and seconded the desired motion, 
which was carried. 

The president appointed Messrs. Joseph 
Wright, Joseph Giroux and Frank Powers 
as the committee. 

A member having asked about the 
minutes of the last convention, they were, 
on motion, taken as read, they having been 
printed in the annual report, a copy of 
which had been sent to every member. 

Mr. F. Powers, of Lunenberg, having 
been appointed on two committees, thought 
it might conflict with business. 

"Nevermind," venturer* Mr. Meredith, 
" as long as it does not inflict." This cre- 
ated laughter, and Mr. Powers smiled and 
said no more. 

A letter was read from the Winosor.Ont., 
association, reporting a membership of 
eight every one of whom regularly attended 
the meetings of the local association. The 
secretary regretted that the association 
would be unable to send delegates to the 
convention. 



A letter from Mr. W. Mansell, of the 
Toronto association, reported that the 
members of the association were not taking 
as much interest in the affairs of that body 
as desired. 

AN ASSOCIATION AT HAMILTON. 

The master plumbers of Hamilton have 
formed an association, and a letter was read 
from Secretary W. D. Smith giving the list 
of membership as follows : A. Clark, J. 
Stewart, W. J. Walsh. H. Harding, A. G. 
Miles, S. Mellon, J. F. Cummings, T. S. 
Kennedy, W. D. Smith, A. Rodgers, G. 
Stevenson and J. Ellicott. Pressure 
business, it was reported, made it impossible 
to send delegates to the convention. 

SICK MEMBERS. 

The illness of Messrs. P. J. Carroll, \f 
Montreal, and W. Mati«Il, ftf "Joronto, 
having been reportedXe§Putk/ns/A>f\ regret 
were passed unanimousT 





President W. H. Meredith. 



THE QUESTION OF SANITATION. 

AN INTERESTING REPORT IN REGARD THERETO 
READ BY J. \V. HUGHES. 

Your sanitary committee for the past year 
respectfully report, as largely the result of the 
efforts of our association, an increasing interest in 
sanitary matters generally, and especially in those 
departments pertaining to and closely allied with 
our business. 

A BETTER CLASS OF GOODS 
is being bought by the general public, and this 
demand has stimulated the manufacturers and 
wholesale dealers who are now making and carry- 
ing in stock fixtures and materials not generally to 
be found in the market at the time of the inaugu- 
ration of our association, and we feel confident that 
the end has not yet been reached, but, that good 
as the work and materials are to-day, as compared 
with the recent past, better and more expensive 
materials will be in demand in the future, resulting 
in greater comfort and 

BETTER HEALTH 

to the general public, and, we hope, financial results 
to our members that shall be in proportion to the 
amount of skill and knowledge required in the 



carrying on of an up-to-date plumbing business, 
which they have not been in the past. 

Our responsibilities are ever increasing, more is 
being demanded of us from day to day in the way 
of technical knowledge, in addition to mechanical 
skill, and it is only by constant applicatio'T and 
study that our members are enabled to keep pace 
with the demand of 

SANITARY SCIENCE 

as applied to our business. We are pleased to 
report that a number of towns have, during the 
past year, taken up the 

QUESTION OF A PLUMBING BY-LAW 

and regret that some of our older cities are still 
content to plod along in the old time, go-as-you- 
please rut. 

We consider that it is quite within the province 
of our Dominion Legislature to pass a general 
plsmbinglaw, that would, in its general principles, 
iply to all populous communities. This is cer- 
Jnly a matter closely affecting public health, and 
trre placing of such a law on the statute books could 
not fail in producing beneficial results. 

The report was received with applause, 
and, on motion of Messrs. Meredith and 
Normand, was referred to the committee on 
resolutions for consideration. 

Mr. Hughes had retired from the room, 
and, on his return, asked what it was pro- 
posed to do with the report of the Committee 
on Sanitation as read by him. On being 
told that it had been referred to the com- 
mittee on - resolutions, he expressed the 
opinion that it would be more advisable to 
submit it to a special committee, especially . 
that portion asking for the Dominion Par- 
liament to pass a general law. It was 
necessary there should be some legislation 
more clearly defining the powers of the 
municipalities in such matters. It has been 
recently declared, for instance, that the city 
of Ottawa had no power to pass the by-law 
which it was now proposed to enforce there. 
* • If it is beyond the power of Ottawa, it is 
beyond the power of Toronto and other 
cities in Ontario to pass such a by-law 
regulating plumbing work," declared Mr. 
Hughes. 

Mr. Hughes was then handed, by Mr. 
John McKinley, of Ottawa, a copy of the 
following letter, written by Mr. McVeity, 
city solicitor of Ottawa : 

The council has no authority to pass such a by- 
law. The section of the Municipal Act which 
authorizes the passing of a by-law by council for 
the licensing and regulating of plumbers only has 
the effect of conferring on council authority to 
make such regulations as will prevent unqualified 
persons from working at the trade, but does not 
extend so far as to permit council to pass by-laws 
regulating the construction of buildings. The by- 
law recommended for adoption by the board of 
examiners goes to that length and is altogether 
beyond the powers of council. The report also 
recommends licensing and regulating of drain-i 
layers. There is no authority for this, and no by- 
law to this effect can be passed. 

President Harris : " Here in Quebec, or, 
rather, in Montreal, we are in a better 
position than you are in Ontario in regard 
to this matter. In the new charter the law 
has been so amended by the Provincial 
Government as to give authority to the city 
to pass a by-law regulating plumbing and 
building construction in general. In Ontario 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






you have not the power to do this, and 
before you have the power it would be 
necessary to secure power as has been done 
in Ems Province. Of course, if a Dominion 
law could be passed it would be better. It 
strikes me there is a growing opinion along 
these lines. Mr. Hughes refers to the sub- 
ject in his report ; Mr. Powers has something 
in his report and I have something in mine. 

Mr. John Watson thought the report of 
the committee on sanitation should go first 
to the committee on resolutions and then, 
if necessary, to a special committee. 

Mr. Hughes : "I know we cannot go to 
the Dominion Parliament and ask them to 
pass a plumbing by-law. It is beyond their 
power to pass such a thing, but the Dominion 
Parliament has the power to pass a law 
dealing with the question of public health, 
and that is what we want." 

The matter was allowed to drop and the 
report went on to the committee on reso- 
lutions. 

THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. 

QUESTIONS AND SUGGESTIONS OF VITAL 
IMPORTANCE TO MASTER PLUMBERS. 

In accordance with the custom of the National 
Association of Master Plumbers, I herewith submit 
my humble report. 

This, being the fifth year of our organization. I 
may state that we are a very young association, and 
we cannot expect to be as prosperous as we would 
like to be. 

Many associations of the same nature as ours, 
after five years' work, were still in the cradle, but I 
am glad to say that we are out of the cradle and 
walking remarkably well. 

During the past year, I have had news from the 
different local associations, and, as a whole, they 
are doing well. Some of them succeeded in getting 
supply houses to sell goods to members of the asso- 
ciation only, the result being that the master 
plumbers who did not belong to the association 
were very glad to join, and both the wholesalers 
and plumbers are deriving great benfit from the 
same. 

This leads me to a suggestion which I think 
should be taken up at this convention. That is, to 
have an interview, or conference, with the jobbers 
and manufacturers, to see if we could not get some 
special protection for the members of our associa- 
tion. This rule works well in the United States, 
and the result would be the same here. 

The greatest objection from jobbers and manu- 
facturers would be that they could not very well 
refuse to sell those who are not members. This 
objection would soon disappear if members of our 
) association were getting better protection from the 
trade than plumbers who are not members, and 
within six months every master plumber through- 
out Canada would become a member of our asso- 
ciation. 

To enable the wholesale trade to act in this way, 
we would have to supply each of them with a list 
of bona fide plumbers, and, about every six months, 
send them a supplementary sheet with all changes 
that have taken place during the six previous 
months. 

In return, we would agree, everything being 




The Reasons 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

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Good advertising to attract trade. 
Good paint to hold it. 

Back of these stand the thorough, progressive methods of 
The Sherwin-Williams Co. Our interest in the paint does not 
end when we have placed it on your shelves. We stand with 
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If you want to see one example of the turn our constant 
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Canadian Division : 

Montreal. 
21 St. Antolna St., 





The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. BOSTON. 

CHICAGO. TORONTO. 

NEW YORK. SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL. KANSAS CITY. 



equal, to limit our purchases to Canadian manu- 
facturers and jobbers. To help in this direction, 
the manufacturers should have a trade mark on all 
their goods, so that we will be able to know whose 
material we are handling. 

During the past year, we had a few complaints, 
which were settled to the satisfaction of all parties 
concerned. 

Generally speaking, the trade has treated us on 
pretty fair grounds for the last 12 months. There 
is one question, though, that I wish to bring up 
and have settled at this convention, one way or the 
other. It appears that the association of boiler 
manufacturers will have nothing to do with us 
whatever. They would not even send delegates to 
our convention to discuss certain things of import- 
ance. As a matter of fact, they refused to send 
representatives to Ottawa last year, and I am 
strongly inclined to believe that they will do the 
same this year. If they do, I 
think that immediate action 
should be taken to settle this 
very serious question. 

During my term of office I 
have had the pleasure of seeing 
the master plumbers of one of 
the principal cities of the Do- 
minion, that is Hamilton, form 
an association, and every mas- 
ter plumber of that city but 
one is a member. The Hamil- 
ton and Halifax associations 
are doing remarkably well. A 
couple of other local associa- 
tions did not seem to have as 
much life, but they will, I am 
sure, follow the example of 
those which are doing much bet- 



ter. Let us always remember that in union there is 
strength, and our association will be as powerful as 
the British flag. Let us educate our members in 
the way of protecting the public in giving them 
good work. Let us have in our association nothing 
but men who understand that we have to reduce 
the work of doctors, by preventing disease, by giving 
the public the very best sanitary plumbing. 

To carry out the above principles, we are not 
unreasonable when we ask the wholesale dealers 
and the public at large a fair remuneration for the 
efforts we are putting forth in the interests of all. 

Since a certain time, associations have been, and 
are being, formed in several cities by the journey- 
men plumbers. Their rules and regulations have 
been presented to the Master Plumbers' Association 
for approval and suggestions. Conference com- 
mittees have also been formed to discuss matters 
of interest to both associations. This shows the 




(irand Trunk Victoria Jubilee Bridge, Montreal. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



harmony existing between the two corporations and 
the great benefit that can be derived therefrom. 

Plumbing by-laws in the different towns and cities 
should not be neglected. Since our association has 
been in existence different cities have benefited to a 
great extent by the work done by the different local 
associations. 

Plumbing regulations have been drafted by the 
Plumbers' Association, and, after a few small 
changes were made by the councils, they were 
adopted. In other places, plumbing by-laws sub- 
mitted by the plumbers' associations are under 
consideration by the respective city councils. 

I would be in favor of what I may call a Federal 
plumbing by-law which would regulate plumbing 
throughout the Dominion of Canada, but in the 
meantime each local association must do its best to 
get proper by-laws in their respective cities. 

In the name of the National Association, I wish 
to thank the members of the pess in general, and 
more particularly the trade papers, for what they 
have done for our association. I must also thank 
the members of this association for the great honor 
they have conferred on me by electing me president 
of this important body. It may be I have not done 
as much as I "should have, but whatever I have 
done was in the interest of all parties concerned. 

I feel very proud in presiding at the fifth annual 
convention in the great commercial metropolis of 
Canada, and I hope that our deliberations may 
result in profitable work for us all. 

J. H. Harris, 

President. 

On motion of Messrs. M c Kinley and Sadler, 
the report of the president was received and 
referred to the committee on resolutions for 
consideration. 

NOVA SCOTIA AND NEW BRUNSWICK 

A BANNER YEAR FOR THE PLUMBING TRADE OK 
THE MARITIME 1'ROVINCES. 

As vice-president of Nova Scotia and New 
Brunswick, I respectfully submit my report for the 
year ending June 30, 1900. 

The past year, I am happy to say, has been 

A BANNER YEAR 
for the plumbing trade in the Lower Provinces, but 
the members of The National Association of 
Master Plumbers are beginning to feel the direct 
benefits derived from their connection with the 
association. I am sorry to say there are still a 
number of master plumbers who hold aloof and 
see no good in the association, but it is to be hoped 
that time will soon soften their prejudices and that 
self-interest will compel them to fall into line. 

The Halifax master plumbers had some 
TROUBLE WITH THEIR MEN, 
which resulted in a general strike. No arrangements 
satisfactoiy to both parties have as yet been agreed 
upon, but it is hoped that an amicable settlement 
will be reached at an early daLe. 

The Board of Health of Halifax city has passed 

A NEW REGULATION 

compelling all master plumbers doing business in 
that city to pass an examination, and qualify as 
journeymen plumbers. The action of the master 
plumbers in claiming the right to do their own 
work during the strike is responsible for the new 
rule. The law is a good one, and should be 

A DOMINION REGULATION, 
and I would suggest that the National Association 
take the matter in hand, and, if possible, have the 
law apply to the whole Dominion. 

We had one or two cases of wholesale dealers 



selling to consumers through wholesale hardware 
firms, the modus operandi being to sell to the hard- 
wa e firm and the hardwareman to sell his custom- 
ers direct. On bringing th j mat er to the attention 
of the supply houses, they pleaded ignorance, but 
I am happy to say it was 

PROMl'TLY ADJUSTED 

to the satisfaction of all concerned. ■ 

The Halifax association, which includes Prince 



Edward Island pbimbers, is in good condition and 
doing excellent work. The meetings are well 
attended and very interesting, The president, 
George H. Perrier, and the local executive deserve 
great credit for the interest they have shown and 
the success which has attended their efforts. 
In closing I wish to call your attention to the 
MANY MISTAKES 
made in estimating and contracting, caused in 



Major Taylor 



CHAMPION OF THE WORLD 



Rides an Iver Johnson Bicycle. 

VVVVVVV\VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVl'lVVVVVAA'V'V\\\Vl\'i'\AA'V\VV\%VV\1 

On June 30th at Manhattan Beach Track he defeated 
Frank Kramer in a special match race of one mile, winning 
two straight heats. 

Watch Hm Win. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



Branches— New York 
Boston 
Worcester 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



«•«• 



Gilbertson's Galvanized Sheets 



1 



PATENT 




FLATTENED 



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Gilbertson's are the only galvanizers who not only roll all their Steel Sheets, but 
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GILBERTSON'S CORRUGATED GALVANIZED SHEETS— all sizes. 

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BRANDS: 



" Gilberton's," "Parsons," " Pontardawe," 

"Lincoln," "Comet," "Regina," "Gwyned." 



GILBERTSON'S TERNEPLATES. " Regina " brand. 

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SIEMENS-MARTIN STEEL SHEETS, close annealed, close annealed and cold 

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Supplies carried by all wholesale jobbers. In ordering please mention brands. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, 



L. 



Agent 



13 St. John Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



'WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 
PLUMBERS' TOOLS. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




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No. 1, VA, 2, 3, 4. 

K to 1, \tol, ' 2 tol!i, 1 to 2, % to 3. 





ELLIN'S PIPE WRENCHES. 

No. 227, 98, 209, 141. 

Hold Pipe ijidtoVA, %to2'A, % to 3, A to 3 . . 



BRIGHT WIRE CUTTERS. 



No. C1431, 6 in. long. 




QjXsikfajwJ 




BINATION" WRENCHES. 

Long Sleeve Nut. 
10, 12, 15, 18Jin. 




HANDY" STEEL PIPE WRENCHES. 

No 2, 3, 4 

Holds Pipe H to %, Ktolj*. \% to 2 in. 




"TRIMO" PIPE WRENCHES. 

Inch 8, 10, 14, 18. 

Hold Pipe yk to %, y % to 1, % to \<A, % to 2 in. 




WROUGHT IRON PIPE. 

For Steam, Water, or Gap. 
Inside Dia. %, yi, A, %, 1, VA, VA, 2 in. 



TORCHES. 

No. 2— "All Right." 
" 6— Combination. 



PIPE VISES. 

No. 1, 0. 

Takes from 1 ' < to 3, ! * to 4 in. 
No. 15, Hinged. 

■« to 3. 




C. PARKER'S "COMBINATION" VICES. 

No. 87—4 in. Jaw, Holds Pipe ', to 2 in. Weight 41 lb. 
" 113— 4 in. " " % to 2 in. " 63 1b. 

" % to 2 in. " 85 lb. 



" 115-454 in. 



OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT, 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 

Graham Wire and Cot Nails are the Best. 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



many instances by carelessness and want of system 
on the part of the master plumbers. This is more 
serious and causes more losses to the plumbing 
fraternity than anything else in connection with the 
business. It also tends to lower the standing of 
the master plumbers in the eyes of the general 
public. Therefore, I hope that steps will be taken 




Past President 3. \V. Harris.: 

at this convention to devise some means of obvi- 
ating this difficulty. 

Frank Powers. 

The report was referred to the committee 
on resolutions. 

PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 

PRACTICAL RECOMMENDATIONS BY PROVINCIAL 
VICE-PRESIDENT WATSON. 

As Provincial vice-president for the Province of 
Quebec, I beg to submit my annual report for the 
year ending June 27, 1900. 

During my term of office my time has been 
taken up a great deal with our local association, 
which is the only association in the Province ot 
Quebec. I would have liked very much to have 
visited several of our cities in this Province, and 
tried to organize local associations, but it has been 
impossible for me to spare the time. 

In electing your vice-president for ihe Province of 
Quebec I would recommend this association to elect 
a gentleman who can 

SPEAK BOTH TRENCH AND ENGLISH, 

as I have found a great loss in not being able to 
speak the French language. However, I feel posi- 
tive the work of organizing locals will not be pro- 
perly done until such time as we can afford to 
employ a regular organizing agent. 

THE BULLETIN. 

I regret very much that The Bulletin has been 
discontinued, and wish that some effort will be made 
at this meeting to again get this paper into cir- 
culation. 

I would recommend that Article XII. of our Con- 
stitution be amended by adding the words "also 
report any change in officers from time to time." I 
know that our national secretary has had consider- 
able trouble in finding secretarys' addresses. 

I was appointed at our last annual meeting to get 



a list of addresses of all master plumbers in Mont- 
real ; you will find inclosed the list ; (by no means 
all the so-called master plumbers), but, I think, 
very nearly all who deserve the name of master 
plumbers, and according to our term as laid down 
in Toronto resolution. In conclusion, I must say I 

DO NOT FEEL SATISFIED 
with my work for the past year, although I have 
given a great deal of my time to association matters, 
but hope that the incoming officer will push the 
good work along and make the coming year a 
banner year for the plumbers. Thanking you for 
all past honors, 

John Watson, 
Provincial Vice-President. 

On motion of Messrs. Denman and 
McGuire, the report was referred to the 
committee on resolutions. 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 

REPORT REGARDING THERETO AS SUBMITTED 
BY PROVINCIAL VICE-PRESIDENT KNOX. 
It is not in my power to boast of any event or 
action that would allow me to say for the Province 
of Ontario that we are yet actively or sympathetic- 
aHy_united as we intend to be. There are a number 
of. corrjofetions in "the- fa* -west of this Jbovince 
w\^*Jft %■* frtBfJJk''ftA'fr^A tr y .apmears^taabe. 
unknown. Under such a cot?cutibJr^ur».f^l^Tndr. 
l|ope can only ba^hat their passage Jj;om darkness 
to fight willtake" plaee-«rf«l4rrfy^ ajjddfo keyiihe 
light burning, they must organize and associate. 
Ottawa, Brockville, and Smith's Falls are'affiliated. 
Could not other towns borrow the pattern? 

H. A. Knox. 

The repoit was referred to the committee 
on resolutions on motion of Messrs. John 
Watson and J. Gibeau. 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE 
COMHITTEE. 

WORK DONE BY THAT COMMITTEE AND ITS 
SUB DURING THE YEAR. 

Your committee have pleasure in submitting their 
report to the fifth annual convention, held in Mont- 
real, for the year ending June 27, 1900. 

As no special business was brought up during the 
last year, there was no reason for calling together 
every member of the executive, but the sub-execu- 
tive, which was composed of the president of the 
National Association, J. W. Harris, P. Ogilvie, 
secretary of the association, and J. W. Watson, 
vice-president of Quebec Province. They met 
several times to transact whatever business was 
brought up before them. Their attention was 
called to 

A VERY IMPORTANT SUBJECT 
by the Toronto association in reference to affiliating 
the members of the Hamilton association with that 
body. The object was to give them certain powers 
to settle certain difficulties they had with wholesale 
dealers, and more especially with one master 
plumber. 

We have advised the Hamilton association, 
through the Toronto association, 

TO TRY AND SETTLE 
that question in a peaceful way. So far, the 
question is still unsettled, but we hope it will be 
arranged in a very short time, and that to the 
satisfaction of all parties concerned. 

We would state in reference to The Bulletin that 
we would have liked to have continued its publica- 
tion, so as to keep the different questions of interest 



to the plumbers before the different local associa- 
tions, but, on account of its not being sufficiently 
patronized, we had 

TO SUSPEND ITS PUBLICATION j. 

for an unlimited time. 

A PAID SECRETARY. 

The question of a paid secretary has come up 
many times, but, so far, no definite solution has 
been arrived at, and it would be in the interest of 
the association to have a paid secretary to do the 
work properly, and, therefore, your executive 
recommend to this association the appointment of 
same. 

We have the pleasure of stating that the Hamil- 
ton master plumbers have formed an association, 
and are doing well for the time being. 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 

MR. P. C. OGILVIE DEALS WITH HIS 

CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER 

MATTERS. 

It gives me much pleasure to submit to this con- 
vention my report for this year. During the year 
I have received 82 communications, and I have 
corresponded with d fferent parties. In all, 97 
communications have been sent ; also, a consider- 
able amount of printed circulars and the annual 
report, and beg to thank the officers and members 
. throughout the Dominion for their assistance 
during the past year. I wish to apologize for not 
promptly answering some of their letters, but I did 
not wish to commit myself in any way until I laid 
them before the sub-executive. Now, gentlemen, I 
think, as we have a lot of business before us, it 
would not be in place for me to make a lengthy 
report, but one thing I think would be a great as- 
sistance to the National Association, if tlAiifferent 
local associations would notify the secretary of the 



NAME AND POST OFFICE AI 

as soon as possible after each electic 
it will be easy for the secretary 
Association to reach the dl 
without any unnecessary- 
happened quite a few tin 
that I have had to ivrittse' 
managed to learn wiirJreasj 
Mr. President. 



K K J 

InVthis way 

tht/vsational 

ociations 

It has 

is last year 

ers before I 

etarv therefor, 




Treasurer Lamarche. 



The following are the local associations that are 
affiliated with the National Association : Montreal, 
52 members ; Toronto, 21 members ; Halifax, 22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



members; St. John, N.H., Stratford, St. Thomas, 
Hamilton. Ottawa, u members; London, Windsor. 
•8 members ; Quebec, Kingston, Winnipeg, St 
CaUparines. 

It was the intention to hold no evening 

Pout of Halifax. 



J 




8 o'clock in the rooms of the Liberal Club. 
There was a fair attendance 

WELCOME TO THE DELEGATES. 

After a little routine work, Mr. Joseph A. 
Giroux, president of the Master 
Plumbers' Association, of Mont- 
real, gave an address of welcome 
to the visiting delegates. He 
i spoke as follows : 

On this occasion of the fifth annual 
convention of the National Master 
Plumbers' Association, it happens that 
I am president of the Montreal Master 
Plumbers' Association, and in such 
capacity it affords me great pleasure 
to welcome you, gentlemen, members 
of this association, coming from east, 
west, north and south, to join this 
brotherly gathering with the sole object 
of promoting the interests of our as- 
sociation. 



a good and plea lani nun- wi, 
( Applause, ) 

President Harris, amid applause, re 
sponded in fitting language, on behalf of the 
National Association, to President Giroux' s 
welcome. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
RESOLUTIONS. 

SOME recommendations regarding THE 
SEVERAL PAPERS SUBMITTED TO IT. 

Your committee advise the adoption of the 
president's report and that a committee i 
to wait on the boiler manufacturers and ascertain 
their grievances, if any, and that a vote of thanks 
be tendered the president. 

Your committee advise the adoption of the secre- 
tary's report in full and that a hearty vote of thanks 
be tendered him. 

Your committee recommended the adoption of 
the report of the president of Ontario as being con- 
formable with the views of this association. 



Port of Montreal. 



session, owing to the hall having been 
rented to other parties for the night. But 
just as the afternoon session was to close, 
Aid. Joseph Lamarche, chairman of the 
local reception committee, offered the asso- 
ciation the use of the hall of the Liberal 
Club at No. 90 St. James street. 

President Harris warmly thanked Aid. 
Lamarche, while Messrs. Meredith and 
Powers moved that the offer be accepted, 
and the members concurred. 



EVENING SESSION. 

The evening session opened shortly after 



While among us it will be our 
p'easure and duty to do our most 
to make your stay interesting as 
well as beneficial to our interests 
as well as those of the general 
public. 

No doubt, during the conven- 
tion there will be new rules and 
regulations as well as suggestions 
presented to the council to study. 
It will be the duty of all to give 
such propositions their keenest 
attention, and, I am sure, that 
all deliberations will be carried 
on in such a way as to make the 
ta«k of the president, as well .is 
all members, an easy and agreeable one. I will 
now take my seat with the hope that all will have. 




Port of St. John. N.B. 

Your committee have much pleasure in rectm- 
mending the adoption of the suggestion ol Mr. John 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Watson, vice-president for Quebec, regarding 
reporting names of local officers to the National 
sejretary, and hope the association will see its way 
clear to'continue The Bulletin. 

The vice-president of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick 
and Prince Edward Island reports. Your comm ttee 
recommend the adoption thereof and would advise 
the association to take steps to get Dominion legis- 
lation as suggested by the report. 

It is with plea ure that we recommend the sani- 
tary committee's report for the consideration of the 
association, and that a vote of thanks be extended 
to them for this important report. 

We also recommend the adoption of the execu- 
tive report. 

The recommendation of the committee on 
resolutions regarding the reports of the 
president and secretary was adopted without 
discussion. 

The reference to The Bulletin brought 
Mr. Meredith to his feet. " It is useless," 
he declared, *' for the resolution committee 
to bring in recommendations of that kind 
unless it is prepared to offer some sugges- 
tions as to how The Bulletin can be run. I 
move that the clause be struck out. I am 
speaking from experience. What we want 
is the cold-blooded dollars." (Laughter.) 
" If we cannot get the cold dollar, do not let 
us adopt the recommendation of the com- 
mittee." 

Mr. John Watson : "I certainly quite 
agree with the remarks of Mr. Meredith. I 
referred to The Bulletin in my report with 
the hope that some member would be able 
to suggest how the paper could be run." 

Mr. Meredith : " Mr. President, I would 
move that the clause in reference to The 
Bulletin be referred to a committee of three, 
namely, Messrs. John McKinley, John 
Watson and Joseph Wright, who shall 
report at Friday morning's convention." 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Moll 
and carried. 

Then, the recommendation of the resolu- 
tion committee regarding the suggestion of 
Mr. John Watson, namely, that the words 
"also report any change in officers from 
time to time" should be added to Article 
XII. of the Constitution, was given some 
consideration. 

Mr. Meredith moved the adoption of the 
recommendation, and, in doing so, urged 
the delegates, on their return home, to 
impress the matter upon their respective 
local associations, for remissness in the past 
in sending the names of new officers had 
caused a great deal of inconvenience to the 
officers of the National Association. 

Mr. Frank S. Power, Halifax, seconded 
the resolution, which was carried. 

The clause as amended reads as follows : 

All local and Provincial Associations when 
organized will at once notify the secretary of the 
National Association, giving the names of its 
officers and members. 

On motion of Messrs. John McKinley 



and Sadler the particular clause in the report 
of the vice-president of Nova Scotia and 
New Brunswick regarding the desirability 
of municipalities obtaining power from the 
Legislature was deputed to the incoming 
legislative committee for consideration. 

The report of the sanitary committee was 
adopted on motion of Messrs. H. A. Knox, 
of Ottawa, and Mr. — Gibeau, of Montreal, 
and the report of the executive committee 
on motion of Messrs. Meredith and 
McKinley. 

On motion of Messrs. W. H. Meredith 
and H. A. Knox, Messrs. John McKinley, 
Ottawa ; W.J. McGuire, Toronto ; R. Ross, 
Toronto ; J. W. Harris, Montreal ; and 
J. A. Sadler, Montreal, were appointed a 
committee to confer with the representatives 
of the manufacturers and of the wholesale 
supply firms. 

NAME OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

A brief discussion ensued over a sugges- 
tion to change the name of the association, 
substituting the word " Dominion," for 
that of "National." The argument ad- 
vanced in favor of the change being to the 
effect that the present style led some to 
think that the association was affiliated with 
the National Plumbers' Association of the 
United States. 

Mr. Joseph Wright led in the opposition 
to the change. "If," said he, "you 
change the name ot the association you 
will incur a great deal of expense. It 
would cost $50 or $60. 

Mr. Frank S. Power, of Halifax, thought 
that the word ' ' National ' ' was good and 
should be retained. "The association," 
he declared, " is now getting to be pretty 
well known." 

It was eventually decided to make no 
change. 

PERMANENT PLACES OF MEETING. 

A question as to the advisability of per- 
manently having the place of the annual 
convention alternate between Toronto and 
Montreal was discussed. 

Mr. Frank S. Power: "The place of 
meeting should be an open one, as we would 
like you to come to Halifax some time." 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Meredith : "If you ask people to 
pay their bills they sometimes tell you to go 
to Halifax." (Laughter.) 

The matter dropped. 

THE APPRENTICESHIP QUESTION. 

Some reference having been made to the 
question of apprenticeship, Mr. Joseph 
Wright explained that in Toronto the work- 
men were trying to do away with apprentice- 
ship. " They insist that we shall have no 
apprentices," he continued. "And we 



have now decided that if a man can do a 
job without a helper we will not send one. 
Then, there are some masters who will not 
take apprentices. They will, howeveif take 
helpers. In our own firm if a young man 
whom we have taken on proves smart we 
tell him he can stay on. He serves five 
years, and the wages we pay him are $2 per 
week for the first year, $3 for the second, $4 
for the third, $5 for the fourth, and $6 for 
the fifth." 

Mr. P. C. Ogilvie spoke in favor of the 
card system, whereby a young man, on 
leaving one employer and going with 
another, was given a card showing the time 
he had been employed at the trade. 

Mr. John Watson expressed himself in 
favor of a card system under the supervision 
af the National Association. 

Mr. H. A. Knox, of Ottawa, also declared 
himself in favor of the card system. " It is 
now practically a theory," he said, "but 
after 5 or 10 years of practical experience 
you will find it of great benefit. We have 
got to cull out the incompetent boy." 

The convention adjourned at 11 o'clock. 

THURSDAY MORNING'S SESSION. 

At 9.30 o'clock on Thursday morning 
Mr.MMeredith, pro tern vice-president, entered 
St. Joseph's Hall and, stepping immediately 
upon the platform, said: "Now, gentle- 
men, we will get right to business. The 
president is busy with a committee and has 
asked me to open the meeting." 

Just as the members were filing into their 
seats Mr. Moll, of Montreal, stepped to the 
platform and remarked : " Mr. Meredith, 
you are wanted in the committee room." 

Everyone laughed, and Mr. Meredith 
said, as he moved away to respond to the 
summons : "Well then, gentlemen, busi- 
ness will not begin now." He was only 
absent a few minutes, and then the thread 
of business was again taken up. 

PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS. 

At the meeting of the association in 
Ottawa last year the retiring president, Mr. 
W. Smith, of London, proposed a scheme 
for the establishment of provincial associa- 
tions, and a committee, composed of that 
gentleman and Messrs. J. W. Chambers and 
E. R. Russell, were appointed to prepare a 
report for the next annual meeting. Mr. 
Smith not being present and no report being 
forthcoming, Mr. Frank Powers, of Lunen- 
burg, asked if it was proposed to do anything 
in regard to the matter. 

After Mr. Meredith had explained the 
situation Mr. John Watson, Montreal, 
moved that discussion of the subject be 
deferred till the next annual meeting. 

Mr. P. C. Ogilvie said that he had at the 
Ottawa meeting approved the principle of 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






provincial associations, and he had not 
changed his mind. His reason for taking 
the siand he did was that the organization 
was not strong enough. 

Mr. Frank Powers expressed his approval 
of the motion, which was carried. 

THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Watson : "I think it would now be 
in order to appoint the nominating com- 
mittee." 




j. ii. Wilson, Vloe-Prealdeot for 
Manitoba. 



Mr. Meredith : " Well, gentlemen, what 
is your pleasure ? " 

Mr. H. A. Knox expressed his dis- 
approval of the present system. " I do not 
wish to disparage the work of the nominat- 
ing committee," he said, " but I think the 
nominations for officers should be made 
direct from the meeting." 

Mr. John Watson : "If you nominate 
officers direct from the floor you will lose a 
great deal of time. I move that a nomin- 
ating committee be now appointed." 

Mr. Frank Powers seconded the motion. 

After Mr. Meredith had explained that 
the names submitted by the nominating 
committee need not necessarily be approved 
of by the convention, the motion was put 
and carried, and the following were 
appointed the nominating committee : John 
Watson, John McKinley, Joseph Wright, 
Frank Powers and Joseph A. Giroux. 

Messrs. H. A. Knox, J. A. Sadler and 
F. S. Power were appointed auditing com- 
mittee. 

PLACE OF NEXT MEETING. 

The question of the next place of the 
annual meeting was taken up and occasioned 
quite a little discussion. 

" I have much pleasure," said Mr. Frank 
Power, of Lunenburg, N.S., " in asking the 
convention to meet in Halifax next year." 

Mr. Meredith (facetiously) : " Is it on 
the map ?" 

Mr. Power : "Yes." (Laughter.) 

Mr. Frank S. Power, Halifax : "I have 



much pleasure in seconding the motion. 
The city of Halifax is large and charitable, 
and amusements there are many. We are 
not joking in this matter. We want you to 
come. We realize that the distances are 
great, but that is not a sufficient obstacle." 

Mr. Knox thought it might be possible to 
secure a special rate for others besides the 
delegates. 

Mr. Frank Powers, Lunenberg : " If you 
can get 17 to go, you can get a parlor car 
at one rate from Montreal. I cannot guar- 
antee anything but from Montreal. Hut, 
when you once get to Halifax, you won't 
desire to come back." 

Mr. Watson : "I know the people here 
would like to go to Halifax, but the expense 
would be so enormous f do not think it 
would be advisable for us to go there next 
year." 

Mr. F. Powers, Lunenburg : "I recog- 
nize the difficulty. But, if the convention 
were held in Halifax, 1 think it would bring 
us in a great many new members. There 
is New Brunswick, for instance. We only 
ask you for this one time, and then we are 
prepared to come up here all the time." 
(Laughter.) " The Halifax association is 
the next largest in Canada, Montreal being 
first." 

Mr. Meredith : "At $3 per capita, $342 
will be realized at this convention. The 
expense of the convention will be about 
$300, leaving, I estimate, about $40 over 
and above expenses. But, there are two 
absent members of the executive. If they 
were here, we would be a little behind." 

"Mr. Powers: "I understand some 
of the associations have not yet paid up." 

Mr. Meredith : "I know that, but I am 
not taking them into account. Now, gentle- 
men, the only motion I have before me is 
that to go to Halifax." 

Mr. R. Ross: "Much as I would like 
the next convention to be held in Halifax, 
I must vote against it. I propose that the 
next convention be held in Toronto. Perhaps 
later on we can go to Halifax." 

Mr. Wright : " I am of the same opinion 
as Mr. Ross. It is too expensive to go to 
Halifax. I think for the benefit of the 
National Association we ought to go to 
Toronto next year." 

Mr. Powers, Lunenburg : " Toronto 
has had the convention once, and all we 
ask is to have it in Halifax once." 

Mr. Ross : " You will get it later on." 

Mr. Powers: "Yes, but we want it 
now." 

Mr. McKinley : "I move that we go to 
Vancouver." (Laughter.) 

Mr. Ross : " You will go there for a 
econder." (Renewed laughter.) 



A vote was eventually taken, and i 
decided by a large majority to hold the next 
annual convention in Toronto. 

Mr. Meredith: "It has been decided 
that the next annual convention shall be 
held in Toronto — the first convention in the 
twentieth century. I can assure you we 
will do all in our power to make your stay 
in the city of Toronto as pleasant and 
profitable as possible. Come with us next 
year and we will try and do thee good." 

" Mr. Powers : " Halifax the year after." 

ARRIVAL OF' THE SUPPLY MEN. 

Just as the clock indicated the hour of 1 1 
o'clock, a dozen or more of representatives 
of the manufacturers and wholesale supply 
houses were brought in and introduced to 
the president. 

"You know, gentlemen," said President 
Harris, " what you are here for. We want 
to talk with you. There are not a great 
many grievances. But we have some. The 
Toronto resolution said you were to sell to 
none but master plumbers, but some of you 
are selling to others. In the second place, 
we are asking you to give members of our 
association better terms than you do to those 
who are not." 

Mr. John Date : "I am very much 
afraid they are not sticking to their agree- 
ment. I also think they should give 
members of this association a better dis- 
count." 

In the midst of the discussion, Aid. J. R. 
Lavignac, representing the Mayor of Mont- 
real, who was detained in Ottawa, was 
announced. That gent'eman, in French, 
bid the delegates welcome to the city of 
Montreal and announced that carriages were 




Joseph Wright, Toronto, Vice-President for B.C. 

in waiting to take them for a drive through 
the city and up the mountain to Lookout 
Point, were refreshments would be served. 
The convention then adjourned to meet 
again the following motning. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FRIDAY'S SESSION. 

It was 10.25 o'clock when President 
Harris took the chair on Friday morning. 

After routine, the first business taken up 
was in regard to 

THE BULLETIN. 

Mr. Joseph Wright, chairman of the com- 
mittee appointed the previous day to consider 
the matter, reported that, after having care- 
fully gone over the matter, the committee 
had found that the wholesale supply trade 
did not care to advertise in The Bulletin, 
and that the sub-committee of the executive, 
who had managed it in the past, while they 
had just managed to make it pay, were not 
encouraged to continue its publication. The 
committee, therefore, recommended that, 
for the present year, The Bulletin be not 
published. "Perhaps, next year," said 



to 5200 after the official report of the pro- 
ceedings had been printed. 

The report was greeted with loud 
applause. 

On motion of Mr. Meredith, the report 
was received and handed to the auditing 
committee. 

VOTES OF THANKS. 

Mr. Meredith: "I move, Mr. President, 
a hearty vote of thanks to the local asso- 
ciation of master plumbers, to the cor- 
poration of Montreal, and to the daily press 
of Montreal." 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Ross, 
and carried unanimously. 

"And now, Mr. President," continued 
Mr. Meredith, " 1. have much pleasure in 
moving a special vote of thanks to the 
publishers of Hardware and Metal. The 




The Richelieu & Ontario Navigation Co.'s Steamer " Corsican," Shooting the Rapids. 
A trip which delighted the delegates. 



Mr. Wright, ' * the supply men might take 
hold and advertise." 

Mr. Knox : "I think the committee has 
come to the correct conclusion. I move 
that the report be received and adopted." 

The motion was seconded and carried. 

THE TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Treasurer Meredith submitted his annual 
report. The reason he had not done so 
earlier in the convention was i hat he desired 
to have it complete. The report showed 
receipts of $609.50 during the year, which, 
with the $170.44 carried over from the 
previous year, made a total of $779.94. 
The expenditure was $458.52, leaving a 
balance of $321.42. Mr. Meredith estimated 
that the surplus would probably be reduced 



report they gave us last year of our Ottawa 
meeting was most full and complete." 
This motion was also carried unanimously. 

A LETTER FROM MR. SMITH. 

The following letter from Mr. W. Smith, 
London, an ex-president of the National 
Association, was read : 

I write you to inform you and all the members of 
the convention that, although I have not the 
pleasure of being with you, and enjoying the 
pleasure that, no doubt, are in store for all those who 
attend the convention, my thoughts and feelings 
are in that direction. Owing to my health not 
being very good for the past few months, and not 
feeling any too well at the present time, causes me 
not to be with you. I have no doubt your con- 
vention will be looking for a report from me, but I 
fail to have one to send you owing to my health. 

Now, as regards the proposed formation of a 
provincial association as was laid down by me at 



our last convention, I am sorry to say that there 
was nothing done in the matter. No doubt some 
of the Toronto delegates will be able to explain 
why I am still of opinion that if provincial i/-.;ocia- 
tions were formed that we would derive a great 
benefit from them. I hope you will pardon me for 
my absence, and I wish you every success in our 
undertakings. 

On motion of Messrs. Meredith and 
Giroux, the letter was received and filed. 

REPORT OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

The next order of business was the 
receipt of the report of the nominating 
committee. 

Mr. John Watson, who presented the 
report, suggested that one office at a time 
be taken up. 

The President : "If there is no objec- 
tion I think we should adopt the recom- 
mendation of the nominating committee." 
Mr. John Wstson : "We 
beg to propose the name of Mr. 
W. H. Harris as president." 
(Applause.) 

President Harris : " After 
having been in this important 
position for one year, and your 
coming back and offering it to 
me for another year, is certainly 
something for which I have to 
thank you very cordially. But, 
after all, I think everyone 
should have his turn. All the 
honor should not belong to one 
man. Every man should have 
an opportunity of showing what 
he can do. I thank you very 
much for your kindness towards 
myself, but, under the circum- 
stances, I cannot accept. I wish 
you to nominate someone else 
in my place." 

"Mr. Watson : " We have 
chosen another gentleman who 
I think it will be a pleasure for 
you to elect. We have chosen 
Mr. W. H. Meredith, of To- 
ronto." (Loud and long applause.) 

Mr. Joseph Wright : "I have very much 
pleasure in moving his election." 

Mr. Frank Powers, Lunenburg: "I have 
much pleasure in seconding the motion." 

Mr. Meredith rose to speak, but his words 
were drowned with cheers and cries of 
"Well, well!" 

Just then Mr. Denman suggested that all 
the members and the supply men should be 
called in, and, while this was being done, 
Mr. Joseph Wright grasped the opportunity 
to bring another matter before the conven- 
tion. "The St. John, N.B., association," 
he said, " is in a very bad condition, and 
I think this association ought to appoint 
someone to go there and try to reorganize it. 



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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The nominating committee thought that 
Mr. Frank Powers, of Lunenburg, N.S., 
would be the man to send, the association 
to pay his expenses." 

President Harris expressed his approval, 
and Mr. Powers, in response to a question, 
said he was willing to try what he could do. 




Frank Towers, Vice-President for N.8. and N.B. 

Mr. Watson said the nominating com- 
mittee were of opinion that the National 
Association should vote $25 to Mr. Powers 
for expenses. 

Mr. Wright : " Mr. Lamarche suggests 
to me that Mr. Powers should be given the 
titleof organizer for theMaritime Provinces." 
(Hear, hear.) 

Aid Lamarche : "But I do not think we 
should limit the amount allowed him for 
expenses." 

Mr. F. Powers : "I would rather have 
the amount limited." 

President Harris also thought the amount 
should not be limited, but Mr. Powers 
persisted and eventually a motion was carried 
unaminously making him organizer for 
the Maritime Provinces with $25 for ex- 
penses. 

The auditing commitee presented its report 
through Mr. H. A. Knox certifying to the 
correctness of the treasurer's report and 
suggesting that a hearty vote of thanks be 
extended to Treasurer Meredith. 

On motion of Messrs. McKinley and 
Gibeau the views of the auditing committee 
were concurred in. 

The supply men now filed into the hall and 
President Harris addressed them as follows : 
" I am glad to see you with us and hope you 
will take an interest in the election of our 
officers." 

Mr. Meredith : " It is moved in amend- 
ment, Mr. President (cries of ' sit down ') 



that Mr. Joseph Wright be nominated for 
the office of president." 

Several members : " No seconder." 
President Harris : "Well, if there is no 
seconder, I shall have to put the motion to 
the meeting. All in favor of this nomina- 
tion will signify in the usual way." 

And the members did signify, to the 
accompaniment of " He's a Jolly Good 
Fellow," in which the supply men took no 
unimportant part. 

Mr. Meredith was then conducted to the 
chair amid renewed applause. 

Mr. Wright : " Speech, speech." 
Mr. Meredith : " I do not think Mr. 
Wright is right when he calls for a speech, 
for the time is gone when speeches should 
be given. I do not know whether I can 
thank this association for having elected me 
to this position. I feel there are men who 
have more experience and who could fill 
the position better than I can. I feel, 
gentlemen, that you have made a mistake 
this morning. But, I can assure you this : 
I will do all in my power for the National 
Master Plumbers' Association." (Hear, 
hear.) " I hope that the good feeling be- 
tween the 'supply men and the master 
plumbers, as exhibited last night and again 
this morning, will be continued during the 
year. The year to come I hope will be 
the best in the history of the association. I 
hope you will all be in Toronto next vear. 
And, after that, on to Halifax !" (Hear, 
hear.) " I say that in order to get a smile 
from our beloved friend Powers, of Lunen- 
burg. (Laughter.) 

The name of Mr. John McKinley, Ottawa, 
was next submitted for the office of vice- 
president, and, amid loud applause and 
" He's a jolly good fellow," a motion con- 
curring was carried. 

" I feel," said Mr. McKinley, as he 
ascended the platform, "very much honored 
by being placed in the position of vice- 
president. I will do the best I can to fill 
it." (Applause.) 

Mr. W. Mansell, Toronto, was nominated 
for the secretaryship, and 
this was concurred in 
amid much applause. 

Several members cried 
"speech," and Mr. J M. 
Taylor, manager of The 
Dominion Radiator Co., 
Limited, yelled " Hur- 
rah ! " 

President Meredith : 
"If Mr. Mansell is not 
here in body he is in 
spirit." (Hear, hear.) 

The name of Aid. La- 
marche, of Montreal, was 



put forward, amid hearty applause, for 
the office of treasurer, and a motion endors- 
ing it was unanimously carried. 

In response to cries for a speech.fAld. 
Lamarche said : " I feel very much honored 
in being elected to this responsible position. 
I do not think the citizens of Montreal would 
place as much confidence in one of their 
aldermen." (Laughter.) 

Mr. Ross, Toronto : " They do not know 
you well enough." 

Aid. Lamarche : "I will try and keep in 
the steps of my predecessor and continue a 
surplus, but I pity the master plumbers." 
(Laughter.) 

President Meredith : "If there are any 
citizens of Montreal here I would say to 
them, ' Send Mayor Lamarche to the 
Toronto convention next year.' " (Hear, 
hear, and laughter.) 

Mr. W. Pennington, Windsor, Ont., was 
elected Provincial vice-president for Ontario; 
Mr. Joseph Thibeault, Provincial vice presi- 
dent for Quebec ; Mr. J. H. Wilson. 
Provincial vice-president for Manitoba ; Mr. 
Frank Powers, Lunenberg, Provincial vice- 
president for Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick ; Mr. Joseph Wiight, Provincial vice- 
president for British Columbia. 

It was not until after a great deal of per- 
suasion that Mr. Frank Powers, Lunenburg, 
could be induced to again accept the position 
of Provincial vice-president for Nova Scotia 
and New Brunswick. 

"Excuse me, Mr. Chairman," he said, 
when his name was submitted. " It would 
be hardly fair of me to take the position of 
Provincial twice running. You had better 
give it to someone else. At any rate, you 
have already appointed me organizer for the 
Maritime Provinces. I take much pleasure 
in nominating Mr. Kinsman, of Halifax." 

Aid. Lamarche said that under ordinary 
circumstances he would prefer that some- 
one else be elected Provincial vice-president 
for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Mr. 
Powers having been appointed organizer, 
but he did not consider the holding of the 



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24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



two offices incompatible, and favored the 
reelection of Mr. Powers. 

Messrs. Wright and Harris both favored 
the reelection of Mr. Powers, and eventually 
the latter meekly submitted to his fate. 

These were elected chairmen of the fol- 
lowing committees : Apprenticeship, J. G. 
Johnston, Ottawa ; legislative, J. W. Harris, 
Montreal ; sanitary, F. S. Power, Halifax; 
essay, E. C. Mount, Montreal. 

The various chairmen selected their own 
committee, and before the convention 
adjourned the following had reported : 

Sanitary — F. S. Power (chairman), G. A Perrier, 
Geo. Kinsman, James Farquhuar, all of Halifax, 
and Frank Dexter, Truro, N.S. 

Apprenticeship — F. G. Johnston (chairman), 
John Hyman, H. A. Knox, H. Normand, E. B. 
Butterworth, all of Ottawa. 

Essay — E. C. Mount (chairman), John Watson, 
Joseph A. Giroux, Joseph Gibeau, and P. J. 
Carroll, all of Montreal. 

On motion of Aid. Lamarche, seconded 
by Mr. F. S. Power, a hearty vote of 
thanks was tendered the retiring officers. 

President Harris: "On behalf of the 
officers of the National Association I have 
much pleasure in thanking you for the hearty 
vote of thanks which has just been carried. 
I think all the officers have been doing their 
very best during the past year, and the year 
has been one of the best in the history of the 
association. A great deal of work has been 
done, and it has been done in a satisfactory 
manner." 

The president's remarks were greeted with 
applause, and, at the conclusion, the repre- 
sentatives of the wholesale supply firms and 
of the manufacturers retired with the com- 
mittee representing the National Association 
to discuss matters appertaining to the trade. 

AN ESTIMATE BOOK. 

The question of an uniform estimate book 
was brought up by Mr. Frank S. Power, of 
Halifax. He said : " In Halifax we are not 
allowed to take the plans out of the archi- 
tect's office. Very often three or four men 
are looking over these contracts at once. 
Doing it in this way, there is naturally a 
great deal of hurry at times, and we have 
come to? the conclusion that mistakes have 
been made, and that therein is the secret of 
the very low figures at which contracts have 
sometimes been taken. In Halifax to-day 
it is scarcely worth while to take a contract 
on account of the low prices which rule. If 
such a book were adopted as was shown to 
me by Mr. Powers, of Lunenburg, I feel 
certain that matters would greatly improve. 
I hereby move that a committee be 
appointed to prepare a printed estimate 
book, similar to that in the hands of Mr. 
Frank Powers, of Lunenberg, N.S., and 
that same be printed and bound and ex- 
posed for sale to plumbers, and that all 



master plumbers be urged to procure copies 
of same, as, in my opinion, this will be a 
step in the right direction and in the best 
interests of the craft generally. 

Mr. Frank Powers, Lunenburg : " I most 
heartily endorse my namesake's views in 
this matter. I have always felt that much 
of the low prices at which work was done was 
due to mistakes in estimating. In this 
estimate book which I have there is every- 
thing that is necessary to complete a con- 
tract. When I make a tender by using this 
book I never make a mistake." 

The motion was seconded by Mr. John 
McFatridge, of Halifax, and carried, and a 
committee was appointed, consisting of 
Messrs. Frank Powers, Frank S. Power, 
and John McFatridge, to compile the book 
and prepare it for the printers. 

A FAIR PRICE FOR WORK. 

Mr. T. Thibeault introduced the subject 
of a uniform price for work, and what 
proved to be one of the most interesting 
discussions of the convention took place. 
Mr. Thibeault complained that in Montreal 
work was done at a price which did not 
allow any profit, and he believed that it was 
all due to the lack of business ability on 
the part of some of the local firms. He 
wanted to know if it was not possible to 
devise some plans whereby an uniform rate 
could be established for work, as he felt 
that this would greatly overcome the diffi- 
culty. 

Mr. Frank Powers, Lunenburg : "In this 
estimate book which I propose to get up 
would be set forth what would be a fair 
price for work." 

Mr. Thibeault : " Several young men 
starting into business are doing injury to 
the trade because of their inexperience. 
My experience is that these men having no 
financial ability think that when they 
get a five dollar bill in their pocket it repre- 
sents so much profit. These firms, of 
course, failed in time, but new firms were 
coming into existence to take their place 
and often practising the same thing. I have 
seen some firms in Montreal charge as low 
as 25c. per hour for labor. Some told me 
they were making up for it by charging 
higher prices on material. But I believe 
in doing things honestly. One thing is 
sure, we do not pay the men a proper rate 
of wages and they are leaving the trade to 
work at other things, and it is all because 
we cannot pay them fair wages and meet 
the competition of firms which pay 25c. per 
hour." 

Mr. Wright : "In Toronto we have a 
retail price list, and this price list gives the 
charge per hour. The charge per hour is 
50c. for steamfitter and helper. The union 
insists that we employ none but union men, 



and if we have a union man who does not 
pay his dues the union men will not work 
in our shop unless he pays his dues. But 
we claim we have no right to have ou.*iaien 
called out on strike because one of their 
number has not paid his dues. We are 
paying our apprentices $2 a week for the 
first year, $3 for the second, $4. for the third, 
$5 for the fourth and $6 for the fifth. Taking 
the average of 30c. for the man and 8c. per 
hour for the helper, we charge 50c. per hour. 
This price is not outrageous. Our men work 
nine hours per day. The union want no 
apprentices and no helpers. In fact, they 
want two plumbers and two steamfitters to 
work together. We have arranged now 
that they will try and do all the work them- 
selves, that is, the men will take their tools 
and do the work themselves. Previous to 
that they would not go out without helpers. 
In Toronto all the members of the Master 
Plumbers' Association live up to the prices. 
This price list has proved quite helpful to 
the architects, for they are able to check off 
accounts by our list. I think the idea of 
Mr. Powers to get up an estimate book is a 
good one, but I do not think he can make 
an uniform price list that will be suitable for 
different towns. While we were in Quebec, 
I might say, we found that some master 
plumbers were charging as low as $1 per 
day for a man." 

Mr. Higman, Ottawa : " Since we 
adopted the price list in Ottawa we have not 
had nearly the same trouble in regard to 
prices. The people have got to understand 
the situation. We charge 40c. per hour in 
Ottawa, and we think of raising it to 45c. 
We pay our men 22 %c. per hour and some 
as high as 25c. The union men ask us to 
employ none but union men. We agreed 
to do this as long as they would not work in 
the shops whose proprietors were not mem- 
bers of the Master Plumbers' Association. 
We find that this has done a great deal of 
good." 

Mr. Wright: "If some of the local 
associations would not want to go to the 
expense of getting out a price list, I think 
they could buy one from either Montreal or 
Toronto. In Toronto we give the items and 
net prices, thus preventing the making of 
mistakes in taking the discounts off." 

President Meredith : "If there could be 
some way of raising the price of contract 
work it would be a good thing. The trouble 
is that if you charge, say, $3 for putting on 
a tap, you would be told that the whole 
closet was put in for $5. What is wanted 
is some way in which the percentage on the 
price of raw materials could be put on." 

Mr. T. Thibeault : "I think we should 
limit the price which we should allow for 
wages, and allow a certain percentage above 
cost on material. There is room in Mont- 



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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



real for plenty of good plumbers ; the only 
trouble is in regard to prices." 

Mr. Knox : " We have found, in Ottawa, 
that one good thing is to say who shall come 
into- the association. In other words, we 
are formulating a system of education." 

Mr. Frank Powers referre i to the strike 
in Halifax where the board of health had 
decided that the men going into business as 
master plumbers must pass an examination 
as practical plumbers. 

Mr. Knox : "Another thing I would say 
is, let master plumbers attend the meetings 
of the association regularly and speak out 
their minds freely. This will help matters 
a great deal." (Hear, hear.) 

Mr. Wright : "I have only had an ex- 
perience of about 43 years in the plumbing 
and heating trade, and I would say, don't 
try to cut a man out of his regular cus- 
tomers." (Hear, hear). "Give way to 
Brown and Smith. In that way you will 
get a great deal of day work, and there is 
more money in it than in contract work." 

"Mr. FrankS. Power: "We have had 
a great deal of trouble in Halifax in this 
way. I have had jobs in which even before 
my man had left the building an employe 
of some other firm was sent to connect the 
boiler." He gave interesting instances of 
th,e extraordinary difference between the 
contract price as submitted by different 
r - .ns, and asserted that in some cases the 

ifferences must have been due to mistakes 

nd nothing else. 

Mr. Wright gave an instance which had 
came under his observation, where, on a 
$1,200 job, there was a difference of $400. 
He encouraged the doing of good work at 
fair prices, and gave instances how it paid 
in the long run. 

Mr. Knox: "In Ottawa we allow them 
to commit sucide, that is, we have allowed 
those people who cut prices to do the work 
and they are gradually being compelled to 
go out of business." 

Mr. Frank S. Power said that they were 
having a good deal of trouble in Halifax in 
not being able to go direct to the proprietors 
when tendering for work, for some of the 
contractors from whom they, the plumbers, 
got the work had no standing. 

Mr. Knox pointed out that they had in 
Ottawa sent notices to the architects stating 
that they would only tender to the pro- 
prietors. This has been found to work well. 

Mr. Wright : " We are trying to do the 
same thing in Toronto." 

President Meredith : " What we want, 
gentlemen, is more confidence in each other. 
If you have — ^fidence that a man is living 
up to his - prices you will not believe the 



tales that are told to you. There are a good 
many people who are only ' bluffing ' when 
they state that they can get lower prices 
than you name." Mr. Meredith gave 
several instances where he had taken this 
stand, and where he had got the work or 
sold the goods as the case might be. 

The appearance of the representatives of 
the supply men and the committee of the 
National Association, who had been in con- 
ference in an ante-room, put an end to the 
symposium. 

Mr. Harris reported that the conference 
had suggested the appointment of a com- 
mittee of three master plumbers, whose duty 
would be to confer with the wholesale supply 
men or manufacturers in the event of any 
grievances or misunderstanding arising, said 
committee to have power to add .to their 
number. 

In the brief discussion which followed, it 
was learned that the idea was to compose 
the committee of Montreal men, but, should 
a grievance arise, say, in Toronto, the com- 
mittee in Montreal would appoint a com- 
mittee in Toronto to investigate it. The 
idea was concurred in, and, on motion of 
Messrs. Sadler and Giroux, Messrs. J. W. 
Harris, J. W. Hughes and Aid. Joseph 
Lamarche were selected as the committee 
in question. 

This was the last business act of the con- 
vention, and Aid. Lamarche proposed 
" God Save the Queen," and, after this had 
been lustily complied with, delegates and 
wholesale supply men joined hands in 
orthodox fashion and sang " Auld Lang 
Syne." 

And this closed the fifth annual conven- 
tion of the National Master Plumbers' and 
Steamfitters' Association of Canada. 



THE NEW OFFICERS. 

The new officers of the association are 
as follows : 

Past President — J. W. Harris, Montreal. 

President — W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

Vice-President — John McKinley, Ottawa. 

Secretary — W. Mansell, Toronto. 

Treasurer — Aid. Joseph Lamarche, Montreal. 

Vice-President for Ontario — W. Pennington, 
Windsor, Ont. 

Vice - President for Quebec — T. Thibeault, 
Montreal. 

Vice-President for Manitoba — J. H. Wilson, 
Toronto. 

Vice-President for Nova Scotia — Frank Powers, 
Lunenburg, N.S. 

Vice-President for British Columbia — Joseph 
Wright, Toronto. 

Chairmen of Committees : Apprenticeship, T. G. 
Johnston, Ottawa ; Legislative, J. W. Harris, 
Montreal ; Sanitary, Frank S. Power, Halifax ; 
Essay, E. C. Mount, Montreal. 



THE BANQUET. 

A BRILLIANT AND SUCCESSFUL AFFAIR AT 
THE WINDSOR HOTEL. 

The banquet tendered by the Montreal 
Master Plumbers' Association in the Windsor 
Hotel was a most brilliant affair. Covers 
were laid for over 100. and those present 
were representatives of the wholesale, manu- 
facturing and plumbing trades. 

Among the manufacturers and wholesale 
supply men present were to be noticed : 
Messrs. John M. Taylor, manager of The 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto ; H. W. 
Anthes, of The Toronto Foundry Co. ; Alex. 
Robertson, of The James Robertson Co., 
Limited ; Geo. Moffatt, of Robert Mitchell 
& Co. ; H. R. I ves and E. Hebert, of H. R. . 
Ives & Co.; H. McLaren, McAvity Stewart, 
of McAvity & Co.; — Ramsay, of The 
Pedlar Roofing Co. ; — Moore, of The Paul 
Heating System Co., of Boston ; J. H. 
Garth, of Garth & Co., and J. A. Meadow- 
croft, representing the saiie company. 

The table was laid in the form of a horse- 
shoe, and presented a very pretty appear- 
ance. The arrangement was excellent, 
and everything passed off in a happy 
manner. Capt. Giroux, president of the 
local association, occupied the chair. 

MENU. 

Canapes. 

Lettuce Neck Clams. 

Puree of Tomate a la Julienne 

Fried Soft Shell Crabs Tortue 

Salmon Sauce Qenevoise 

Petits Chateaux 

Small Patties of Chicken Fresh Mushrooms 

Creamed Spinach 

Spring Lamb Mint Sauce 

Green Peas Mashed Potatoes 

Dressed Lettuce 

Punch Venitienne 

Fruit Pudding Wine Sauce 

Pine Apple Ice Cream Strawberry Jelly 

Assorted Cakes 

Cheese Crackers Coffee 

It was 10 o'clock when the first toast on 
the programme, "The Queen," was pro- 
posed. This toast was honored in the usual 
manner and enthusiastically, as was also the 
next " His Excellency Lord Minto, 
Governor - General of the Dominion of 
Canada." 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION. 

The most important toast, " The National 
Association of Canada " was proposed by 
Mr. Frank Powers, of Lunenberg, which he 
did in a fitting manner. The name coupled 
with the toast was that of the President, Mr. 
J. W. Harris. Mr. Harris, on rising to 
speak, was greeted with vociferous cheering 
and "See him smiling," " Don't believe 
him just now," etc. He spoke in part as 
follows : " Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen, 
I thought you had heard enough of me to- 
day, without again calling me to speak, but 
it is always with pleasure that 1 respond to 
a toast of this kind. I think I can always 




Jt look's-. like ai)d is like a band-cut file, tr>at 

is our intention, 
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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



speak best when the subject is the master 
plumbers of Canada. I would like the 
wholesale people to bear in mind that we 
are one family. We find that the whole- 
sale people are very good people, and we 
hope that they will be ready to meet us and 
do what we ask them. 

" The first thing we want is to have our 
plumbers well educated in order that they 
may perform good sanitary work. If you 
go on board a steamship, the first thing you 
will notice in the engine-room is a certificate 
as to the qualifications of the engineer. If 
you don't see that you will want to get off 
that boat and try another. But I would like 
to know if it is not as important to have a 
plumber in your house who has a certificate 
showing that he can do good woik, and 
thus prevent your being smothered with 
sewer gas, which is worse than being 
drowned in the ocean. (Laughter.) 

' ' We have been trying to get by-laws 
passed by city councils in different cities, 
and most of the cities I am happy to say, 
have passed by-laws as suggested by i^s; 
and others are talking of doing so. In. this* 14 
way they were not working merely for the s 
purpose of putting a few more dollars in 
their pocket, but trying to benefit the public. 
To accomplish this we must be one. The 
wholesale people of Canada must try and 
help us to get these things through. I ask if 
we are unreasonable in seeking their aid ? 
If you will give us protection we will give 
you more protection in return." 

* ' I am glad to say that the association 
has made good progress during the year. 
New associations have been formed, and 
they are doing very well indeed. I do not 
care to mention the names for fear that I 
may forget some, and if I did they would 
not forget me." (Laughter.) " If, during 
the next year things go on progressing as 
they have in the past, there will not be 
many cities or towns in the Dominion that 
will be without an association. We must 
live and let live," was Mr. Harris' con- 
cluding remark. 

SANITARY LAWS. 

The next toast proposed was that of "The 
Corporation of Montreal," the name of 
Alderman Lamarche being coupled there- 
with. Mr. Lamarche was greeted with loud 
applause as he arose to speak. He said : 
"Mr. Chairman and gentlemen, it affords 
me great pleasure to respond to the toast of 
the corporation. I am sorry that the Mayor 
is not here to respond, but he was unable to 
leave Ottawa, and I have in my hand a 
telegram from him which reads, "My 
dear Lamarche I am sorry to say I cannot 
leave Ottawa, but extend to the Master 
Plumbers of Canada my most hearty con- 
gratulations. (Applause.) 

"I am sorry he is not here ; if he were 



here, he would have done the honors in a 
way that would have pleased the master 
plumbers and also the citizens of this great 
city. I did not expect that I would have to 
respond to this toast, but I have nothing 
but good feeling towards the master 
plumbers of Canada. I had the honor of 
being an official member of the National 
Association for some time, and now I have 
the honor of belonging to the corporation 
which is desirous of carrying out your wishes. 
We are just now studying such by-laws as 
will be in conformity with the opinions you 
have expressed during past years. We have 
already made certain improvements and we 
are just about passing by-laws which were 
framed according to your views. We also 
have the advantage of having a building 
inspector as recommended by you, so that as 
far as the coloration is concerned it is will- 
ing to do everytrujB^lmt it can in the way 



the Master Plumbers' Association. "We 
do not need to wish your association success. 
Its success is already established." In 
closing, he expressed the wish that T ; 
National Association would soon visit the 
Maritime Provinces. 

Short speeches were also delivered to the 
toast "Our Guests" by Mr. Robertson, of 
The James Robertson Co., Limited, and 
Mr. Ramsay, of The Pedlar Metal Roofing 
Co., Oshawa. 

The toast, " The Montreal Association," 
brought Capt. Giroux, president thereof, to 
his feet. He said that when he was elected 
president of the Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion of Montreal, he never thought he would 
be compelled to preside at the banquet of 
the National Association. "As a local 
association we have done our very best to 
receive and entertain you in this city of 



ours, but we would like to do a great deal 
of putting into th^fbj^ws provisions fha1r"^HaQre. " (Applause and "Hear, hear.") 
will be favorable to the healthof tie city." During the "evening songs were rendered 

why they left their happy homes*' .J* K Messrs,, Touranjeau, Normand, R. Ross, 

CaptJGiroux a*nd Mr.McAvity Stewart gave 
a recitatioJS ■* i 

. k _^ was Jpng jjast the hour of midnight 
re the last guest left the banqueting hall 



The next toast, "Our Guests," was pro- 
posed -.bv^ Mr. W. H. Meredith. ■Kltean 
assuse you," he said, amid laugfrrer7 *^«a* 
it was for you that we JWtjjur happy homes. 
We have come down here to legislate for 
your special benefit. -An^i if you will give 
all the support you can we will give the 
same to you." 

Mr. H. W. Anthes responded in one of his 
characteristic speeches. "In Ontario," he 
said facetiously, " everything is all right as 
far as the supply trade is concerned. What 
is the matter with Montreal?" (Cries of 
"It's all right.") "All difficulties can be 
settled without any ill-feeling. If anyone 
has kept the agreement we will have to call 
him down and then call him up again." 
(Laughter.) 

Mr. H. R. Ives, in responding to the 
toast, said he had very great sympathy 
with the objects of the National Plumbers' 
Association. He believed the future was 
full of great possibilities. 

Mr. Alex. Robertson, representing The 
James Robertson Co., Limited, said it was 
the desire of the supply men to work in 
harmony with the Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion. 

Mr. John M. Taylor declared there was 
no one more interested in the master 
plumbers than he was. " I owe," he said, 
" a great deal to them. It is 23 years since 
I started with the wholesale supply trade 
and the position I hold to day is largely 
due to the influence of the master plumbers. 
I can only wish you the very best of success 
and hearty good luck," he concluded amid 
applause. 

Mr. McAvity Stewart, representing 
McAvity & Co., St. John, N.B., said his 
firm was always in hearty sympathy with 



befor 



The comrrfittee to which much of the 
. credit for the success of the banquet is due, 
was composed of Captain Giroux, and 
Messrs. J. Meadowcroft and J. A. Sadler. 

THE ENTERTAINMENT PROVIDED. 

The programme which the local associa- 
tion, aided by the wholesale supply firms, 
had prepared for the entertainment of the 
delegates was most lavish, and it was carried 
out admirably. The profuseness of the 
praises of those for whose benefit it was pre- 
pared is proof of that, and too much praise 
cannot be given to Aid. Lamarche, chair- 
man of the joint reception committee, and 
Capt. Giroux, president of the local associ- 
ation. 

The first number on the programme of 
entertainment was a drive on Thursday 
to the top of the mountain. Carriages were 
at St. Joseph hall, about noon, and on 
reaching the famous Lookout Point, after 
a delightful drive, a tasty luncheon was 
served. His Worship, Mayor Prefontaine, 

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TACKS 
WIRE^^ 

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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



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MONTREA 



flanufacturers of 



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Light Fixtures. 



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Steamfitters' 



BRASS GOODS 



CATALOGUES SUPPLIED TO THE TRADE. 



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30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



<P 



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Poultry NettinQ 

Galvanizi 

N9I9 STEEL 
WIRE 



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POULTRY NETTINGS 



and LAWN FENCINGS are not 
surpassed in the world. 

Their WOVEN WIRE FENCINGS have stood years of successful 
testing 1 ; special offers are now made on HOG FENCINGS. 

All of the above goods are manufactured by THE ONTARIO WIRE 
FENCING CO., Limited, of Picton, Ont., and are sold by 

OF HAMILTON and 

MONTREAL. 

Limited. 
GENERAL AGENTS; ALSO BY THE CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



The B. Greening Wire Co., 



Agent for Railway Fencing 



MR. JAMES COOPER, Montreal. 



was unavoidably detained in Ottawa, 
and Alderman Lavignac received the 
the delegates in his stead. After luncheon 
the delegates were to have taken 
a steamer and inspected the harbor im- 
provements, but when the party left Look- 
out Mountain it was too late in the afternoon 
and the pleasure had to be foregone. 

On Thursday evening the delegates were 
entertained to a complimentary banquet in 
the Windsor Hotel. Particulars of the 
banquet are given elsewhere. 

On Friday afternoon the visitors were 
taken for a street car ride through the city, 
then by train to Lachine, and from there 
the rapids were run while a gale was blow- 
ing from Lake St. Louis. 

The joint reception committee was com- 
posed of the following gentlemen : Chair 
man, Aid. Lamarche ; H. G. McLaren, J 
Watson, J. Gibeau, E C. Mount, T. Moll 
A. Robertson, H. J. Fuller, T. Thibeault 
G. C. Denman, Jos. Montpetit, J. W 
Hughes, P. J. Carroll. 

THE HALIFAX ASSOCIATION. 

The Halifax Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion has a membership second only to that 
of Montreal, but it was stated at the con- 
vention that as far as organization and 
influence are concerned it is easily in the 
lead. 

THE POWERS AND POWER OF 
NOVA SCOTIA. 

Nova Scotia sent more power to the con- 
vention than any other Province in the 
Dominion. There were Frank Powers, 
from Lunenbnrg, and Frank S. Power, 
from Halifax. But, aside from their names, 
they were a power. 

" I put the ' s' at the end of my name 
and Frank S. Power puts his in the 
middle," explained Lunenburg Powers to a 
delegate who had become somewhat mixed 
; n regard to the names of the two gentlemen 
from the Province by the sea. 

"But you are both power to the elbow 



of the association," remarked a facetious 
member of the convention. 

CONVENTION NOTES. 

Toronto is the next place of meeting. 

"Well, well!" For the interpretation 
thereof, ask Mr. Anthes. 

"On to Halifax," was the cry of the 
convention. 

The convention wanted a good man for 
sergeant-at-arms and so they wisely selected 
Mr. Bonhomme. 

The programme of entertainment pro- 
vided by the local association exceeded the 
capacity of the delegates to enj oy. 

Aid. Lamarche, chairman of the reception 
committee of the local Master Plumbers' 
Association, was an ideal man lor the 
position. 

" While among us," said Mr. Joseph A. 
Giroux, president of the local association, 
" it will be our pleasure and duty to do our 
most to make your stay interesting as well 
as beneficial." And they succeeded admir- 
ably. 



THEY SHOWED GOOD JUDGMENT. 

That The Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle 
Works showed good judgment in selecting 
" Major " Taylor to represent them on the 
track was clearly proven at Manhattan 
Beach on June 30, when the ". Major" 
defeated Frank Kramer, winning two 
straight heats of their special match race of 
one mile. 

It is possible that another match may be 
arranged. 



THE IVER JOHNSON WINS. 

Alex. Sanguigni, one of the crack riders 
of the Pittsburg Century Club, won the 
time prize in the Goble 25 mile road race, 
which was run in Pittsburg on June 24. 
His time wais 1. 15.35, which is the record 
for the Butler plank course. Sanguigni 
rides an Iver Johnson, 



BUILDING TRADE NOTES. 

A new fire station is to be built in Mont- 
real. 

Ottawa building permits average seven or 
eight per day. 

A new Evangelical church will be built in 
Stratford, Ont. 

A new Presbyterian church is being built 
in Brandon, Man. 

An addition is being built to the Baptist 
church, Dundas, Ont. 

Extensive repairs are to be made on St. 
James' church, Wardsville, Ont. 

A brick church is being erected by the 
Methodists of Mount Pleasant, Ont. 

A station is to be built at Dutton, Ont., 
by the Lake Erie and Detroit River Railway. 

Tenders are asked for by S. Edgar Mas- 
tin, Bloomfield, Ont., for building two steel 
bridges. 

D. H. Smallwood and J. K. Stevenson 
are building residences in Moose Jaw, 
N.W.T. 

Chas. Fingland and Jno. McMillan are 
erecting a brick building in Moose Jaw, 
N.W.T. 

Aid. Hopewell, Ottawa, is erecting four 
brick dwellings, two veneered, and a 
cottage. 

Henderson & Potts, paint manufacturers, 
Halifax, N.S., intend to erect a large paint 
woiks in the fall. 

H. Rideout & Co. are building a three- 
storey addition to their furniture establish- 
ment in R.at Portage, Ont. 

The contract for the extension of the 
Presbyterian church at Durham, Ont., has 
been awarded to J. W. Crawford. 

Mr. Browning, Aurora, Ont., has the 
contract for building a brick residence for 
Dr. Campbell at Bradford, Ont. 

The Catholic school commissioners of 
Montreal have decided to build a new school 
at a cost of not more than $35,000. 

Tenders are called for by A. B. Petrie for 
all the trades necessary for the erection of 
market buildings and a fire hall at Guelph, 
Ont. 



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Importers and 


MANUFACTURERS 


Used on all 


Dealers in 


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Machinery Bearings 


Ingot Copper 


Columbia Phosphor Tin 


Steamships 


Ingot Phosphor Bronze 


Plumbers' and Tinners' 


Dynamos 


Scrap Copper and Brass 


Solder 


Saw and Shingle Mills 


Antimony 




Zinc Spelter 


Stereo, Lino and 


Paper, Pulp, 
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MONTREAL. 



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32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



PLUMBING TRADE IN MONTREAL. 

THE summer plumbing trade in Mont- 
real is quiet, yet it presents some 
interesting features. With the 
majority of the plumbers it is now "between 
seasons," and particularly so with the 
smaller concerns, whose business is princi- 
pally made up of the repairing and refitting 
trade. These people have difficulty in find- 
ing employment for their men between the 
rushes of spring and fall. Nor are there as 
many contracts as usual to keep the staffs 
of the larger firms busy during the interim. 

The building of residences is not going 
on as briskly as it was last year, and the 
utility of contracts is now being brought 
forcibly home to those who assert there is no 
business profit in contracts. 

Competition has certainly lowered con- 
tract prices, but it must be remembered that 
benefit accrues from a contract by its giv- 
ing employment to a staff necessary in the 
spring and fall, as well as by the direct 
profit. But the lack of number is made up 
partly, at least, by the size of the contracts 
now being let, for there are some first-class 
new buildings now being pushed forward in 
Montreal. Large buildings assure large 
plumbing contracts. 

The refitting of the C.P.R. Windsor street 
station, the new building at the corner of 
St. Francois Xavier and Hospital streets for 
the C.P.R. Telegraph Company, and the 
new offices of the G.T.R. on McGill street, 
will all give a great deal of work to the 
Montreal plumbers. 

The rivalry for the contracts is keen. 
Moreover, architects are at work preparing 
plans for large new buildings for the Bank 
of Montreal and for the Liverpool, London 
and Globe Insurance Co. It is whispered 
also that several other financial institutions 
intend to erect large buildings, and are now 
preparing plans therefor. The drop in the 
price of building iron seems to have started 
a building fever, so the plumbing trade 
promises to be brisk in Montreal. 



MONTREAL PLUMBING CONTRACTS 

MR. JAMES ATCHISON, plumber, 
33 Bleury street, is having his 
premises considerably enlarged to 
accommodate his growing business. 

Mr. J. W. Hughes has secured the follow- 
ing contracts : Heating and lighting a 
house and stable for Mr. C. Gudewill, 
Bishop street; heating and lighting two 
houses for Mr. H. Earle, Mount Pleasant 
avenue, Westmount ; lighting two stables 



on McGregor street for Messrs. H. Gault and 
P. Macarthur; heating and lighting the new 
residence of Dr. Hugh M. Patton, on Mc- 
Gill College avenue, and the entire fitting of 
Her Majesty's Cafe on Guy street — all in 
Montreal. 

Carroll Bros, are busy completing the 
work on the Webster House, on the corner 
of St. James and Cathedral streets, Mont- 
real, and on Mr. Hartland McDougall's 
new residence in Dorval. They also have 
contracts in connection with two new Mont- 
real residences on Elgin street for Mr. 
Meekle and Mr. Matthews, as well as with 
a new store for Mr. G. W. Stevens, Mont- 
real, and a residence on Mance street for 
Mr. Dunn. 

Mr. P. J. Carroll, ex-president of the 
Montreal Plumbers' Association, has been 
confined to bed for some weeks with an 
attack of la grippe tinged with typhoid. He 
was missed from the convention of last 
week. We have reason to hope that he 
will be able to attend to business shortly. 

Douglas Bros., of Toronto, have secured 
the important contract of placing the copper 
roof on the G.T.R. offices. 



M'GUIRE & CO.'S MONTREAL 
BRANCH. 

THE Montreal branch of the Toronto 
firm of W. J. McGuire & Co,, which 
was established at 1966 Notre Dame 
street about a year and a half ago, has 
already begun to acquire a large share of 
the plumbing business of Montreal. Mr. 
McCauly, the local manager, has proven 
himself to be a good business man, as well 
as a competent, scientific plumber. 

This firm is just finishing the plumbing, 
heating, and lighting of the new Merchants 
Bank, as well as a similar job in the London 
and Lancashire building. They have also 
had a good deal of residential contract 
work this season, and are now at work upon 
a summer residence for Mr. R. B. Angus 
at St. Ann's ; on a fine new dwelling for 
Mr. A. Patterson on Simpson street, Mont- 
real, and on a large new house for Mr. 
James Gardiner, Stanley street, Montreal. 
They have lately secured contracts for the 
plumbing, heating and lighting of the new 
St. Peter's church in Sherbrooke ; of Mr. 
R. W. Seford's new residence on Drum- 
mond street, Montreal, and of Mr. C. R. 
Hosmer's new residence and stable on 
Drummond street. A big job at the new 
Redpath Library, McGill College, as well 
as a large one at The Salvador Brewing 



Co.'s, St. Paul street, Montreal, have also 
fallen into their hands. This is probably 
the only firm in Montreal that engages in 
plumbing exclusively. All others partake 
of the tinsmithing, galvanized iron, and 
roofing trades as well. 



TORONTO PLUMBING CONTRACTS. 

THE Keith & Fitzsimons, Co., Limited' 
Toronto, have secured the contract 
for the plumbing, heating, etc., in the 
new wing of the Queen's Hotel, Toronto. 

George Ashdown has the contract for the 
plumbing in a row of 1 5 houses at Toronto 
Junction. 

James Sherlock, Toronto, has the con- 
tract for the plumbing in the Winchester 
street school, Toronto ; $178. 

Purdy, Man sell & Co., Toronto, have 
secured the contract for the plumbing in 
Dovercourt school, Toronto ; $ 185. 

The Bennet & Wright Co., Limited, have 
been given contracts for the plumbing, heat- 
ing, gasfitting, etc., in dwellings at 79 St. 
George street, 109 St. George street and 69 
Spadina road. 

W. Mashinter & Co., Toronto, have con- 
tracts for the plumbing in the Hamilton 
street school, steam -heating the Winchester 
street school ; $5,010, for plumbing in a pair 
of houses on Crawford street, Toronto. 

Guest & Co. , have contracts for plumbing 
in a residence on Berkley avenue and in the 
Toronto Street Railway's buildings on 
Sherbourne street, and for plumbing and 
heating in the Canada Life building, 8 and 
12 King street east, Toronto. 

Fred. Armstrong, Toronto, has contracts 
for plumbing in residences for James Philips, 
at 86, 88, 90 and 92 Markham street, and 
for plumbing and heating in W. A. Brad- 
shaw's two houses at 88 and 90 Spadina 
road, William Gooderham's residence on 
Bedford road, R. W. Simpson's residence at 
2)4 Wellesley place, and two houses at 6 
and 8 Scarth road. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

rankine's patent feed water filters. 
The Rankine Patent Feed Water Filter 
Co., Limited, Liverpool, have issued a 
handsome illustrated catalogue showing 
their different filters, for land and marine 
boilers. Special types of filters for electric 
lighting plant, etc., are described and 
illustrated. A list of the ships, firms, etc., 
using their filters is given, as well as many 
testimonials from managers of well-known 
concerns. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TORONTO BUILDING PERMITS- 

THE City Commissioner of Toronto 
has issued his monthly statement re- 
al ) garding building operations. Another 
decrease is shown by the comparative 
figures of permits issued, which are as fol- 
lows : 

June, 1899 $"7<V35 

June, 1900 94.39° 

Decrease $ 75>745 

Six months to the end of June : 

1 899 $997.°°° 

1900 94 2 i'94 

Decreaee $55,406 

Building permits have been issued during 
the past week as follows : Wm. Wright, 
pair two-storey semi detached brick and 
stone dwellings on Brunswick avenue, near 
Ulster street, #4,000 ; M. S. Kellow, two- 
storey brick and stone residence on Wells 
street, near Albany avenue, $3,000 ; Wm. 
Milne, two-storey brick addition to dwelling, 
33 Stewart street, J 1,000 ; C. A. Dinnick, 
two-storey detached brick and stone resi- 
dence on Lowther avenue, near Spadina 
road, $3,000 ; the Toronto Public School 
Board, third additional brick and stone 
storey to school on Fern avenue, near 
Sorauren avenue, $10,000; J. J. Walsh, 
pair two-storey semi detached brick and 
stone dwellings, 1 1 1 and 1 1 3 Ty ndal avenue, 
$6,000; M. Staunton & Co., two-storey 
addition to factory, 948 Yonge street, 
$6,500 ; W. R. Thompson, two storey brick 
residence on Brunswick avenue, near 
Lowther avenue, $3,000. 



young couple left on a short trip east, and, 
on their return, will summer in one of their 
cottages at Courtright, on the St. Clair. 



PLUMBING PROSECUTIONS IN 
HALIFAX. 

The Halifax Herald, of June 26, contains 
the following : " The special committee of 
the city board of health, appointed to con- 
sider violations of the plumbing rules by 
plumbers who do not hold licenses, sub- 
mitted a report at yesterday's meeting of 
the board. It was decided to prosecute all 
the men reported by the plumbing inspector, 
and also prosecute the men who installed 
the plumbing in Alderman O'Donnel's 
house, 251 Albermarle street, without a 
permit. 

"A copy of a petition signed by six 

plumbing firms, sent to the Governor-in- 

Council in opposition to assent being given 

j the board's amendments to the plumbing 

rules, was read and tabled." 



MR. ARMSTRONG TAKES A WIFE. 

Mr. A. D. Armstrong, eldest son of John 
Armstrong, general merchant, Brigden, 
Ont., and manager of the business, was 
married at high noon on June 26 to Miss 
Edith, eldest daughter of John Walker, 
oil producer, Petrolea. After lunch the 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES 

VE. PARADIS has been appointed 
curator of A. Grenier, general 
• merchant, Murray Bay, Que. 

Martin Beck, hardware merchant, Mont- 
real, has assigned. 

Stevenson & Johnson, tinware, etc., 
Sarnia, Ont., have assigned to C. B. Arm- 
strong. 

J. L. Johnson & Co., hardware merchants, 
Edmonton, N.W.T. , have assigned to James 
McGeorge. 

The Brandon Furniture Manufacturing 
Co. (S. Berlind and W. J. Palmer), Mont- 
real, have assigned. Louis S. Margolese is 
appointed provisional guardian. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

W. M. Knowles & Co., coal dealers, 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

A. Letang & Co., hardware merchants, 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

Suttie & Davidson have formed a partner- 
ship in bicycles, Wolfville, N.S. 

Parkes Bros., painters, Vancouver, B.C., 
have dissolved ; Alfred Parkes continues. 

W. Bellingham & Co., implements and 
manufacturing agents, Montreal, have dis- 
solved. Wm. James Bellingham has regis- 
tered proprietor ; style, W. Bellingham, 
Son & Co. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

G. W. Ludlow, hardware merchant, Dry- 
den, Ont., has sold out to Samuel Black. 

The stock of C. D. Chown, hardware 
merchant, Kingston, Ont., insolvent, is ad- 
vertised for sale by tender. 

The buildings, stock and machinery of 
The Lockeport Iron Works, Lockeport, 
N.S., will be sold by auction on July 18. 

CHANGES. 

E. Landry & Frere, carriagemakers, St. 
Sylvestre, Que., have registered. 

Alex. L. Godon, hardware merchant and 
tinsmith, Arnprior, Ont., has commenced 
business. 

Will J. Carmichael has registered as pro- 
prietor of The Standard Tinware Co., 
Montreal. 

Avard Beeler has opened a foundry at 
Bridgetown, N S., and is moving his saw- 
mill there from Clementsvale, N.S. 

FIRES. 

B. Stoffel, carriages, etc., Waterford, 
Ont., was burned out. 

Robt. Stevenson, harness dealer, Glencr e, 
Ont., has been burned out. 

Thomas Stewart, coal dealer, Belleville, 
Ont., has had elevator burned ; partially 
insured. 



George Wilson & Co., planing mills, etc., 
St. Catharines, Ont., partially burned out ; 
insured. 

Chalmers Bros. & Bethune.Manitou, hard- 
ware, grain, etc., elevator burned at Pilot 
Mound, Ont. ; insured. 

The Portland Cement Co. at Lakefield, 
Ont., have purchased the planing and saw- 
mill, water-power, etc., from Con. Young. 
They will run a barrel factory at Young's 
Point in connection with their cement 
business. 

CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
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The Ontarij 
Lantern Co. 



WALTER GROSE, MONTREAL 

Sola Sell ng Agent. 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 6, 1900. 

HARDWARE. 

THE volume of trade during the past 
week in general hardware has de- 
creased, if anything, and, in most 
lines of material, the usual midsummer dull- 
ness rules supreme. There has been no 
further change in barbed wire, but prices 
are easy at the decline. Smooth wire has 
been lifeless, and there has only been the 
merest jobbing trade in cut and wire nails, 
screws, bolts, rivets, etc. Rope continues 
easy, and, while there has been some in- 
quiry for sporting goods, such as guns and 
ammunition, it has not amounted to very 
much as yet. 

Barbed Wire — Prices are unchanged 
this week at the decline, and demand is 
light. By a typographical error the base 
last week was given as $3.50. It should 
have been $3.30. 

Galvanized Wire — There is only a small 
business noted in this line of material. We 
quote: Nos. 6, 7, and 8 guage, #3.95; No. 9, 
$3.20; No. 10, $4.10; No. 11, $4. 15; No. 12, 



#3.35; No. 13, $3.45; No. 14, #4-5°; No - !5. 
$5 ; and No. 16, $5.25. 

Smooth Wire — There is little activity to 
note in smooth wire of any sort. We quote 
$3.20 per 100 lb. base. 

Fine Steel Wire — As last quoted. 
Discount 12^ per cent, off list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — Without 
change. Discounts are 55 and 2^ per 
cent, on brass, and 50 and 2 5^ per cent, 
on copper. 

Fence Staples — Unchanged at $3.60 for 
bright. 

Wire Nails — There is a small jobbing 
demand for these, while prices are steady at 
$3.20 for small, and $3.10 for carlots. 

Cut Nails — There has been little busi- 
ness done in cut nails, which we quote at 
$2.85 for small, and $2.75 for carlots. 

Horse Nails — Business is extremely 
light. Discount, 50 per cent, on Standard 
and 50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Quiet. We quote as fol- 
lows: Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, #3.90; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4. 1 5 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and 



larger, $4. 15 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.40; 
X L steel shoes all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, $4.20 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4 45 ; 
feather-weight, all sizes, $5.45; toe weight 
steel shoes, all sizes, $6.55 f.o.b. Mont- 
real. 

Screws — In moderate request. Discounts 
are : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off list ; 
round head bright, 75 per cent. ; flat head 
brass, 75 per cent.; round head brass, 67 *4 
per cent.; flat head bronze, 67^ per cent.; 
round head bronze, 62 }£ per cent. 

Bolts — Unchanged. Discounts are : 
Tire bolts, 60 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 50JR cent. ; ditto, full square, 
65 per cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 52^ 
percent.; coach screws, 65 percent.; sleigh- 
shoe bolts, 70 per cent.; blank bolts, 52^ 
percent. ; bolt ends, 52^ percent. ; nuts, 
square, 3J^c. per lb. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4c. off ; stove bolts, 60 and 10; plough bolts, 
50 per cent. 

Rivets, Etc. — Inactive. Discounts are as 
follows : Best iron rivets, section, car- 
riage, and wagon box, black rivets, tinned 
do., coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 



Enamelled Ste&hSinks 

waned. 




x i j i8^x 3|# 6'.; inches. 



* • * " V * 



where 



iing pressed out of one piecejof sheet steel there are no joints 
a leak mi§^it occur. '1/ 

heayy coating of ename>both^iiiside and out preserves a smooth, 
Wf4wsT "• * i V 



^ CottpMnjjs^p>rco*necth^ wests' pipe supplied with each sink. 
Made ih White, Famous and Imperial Wares. 
WE AL3JO MAKE a full Line in Galvanized and Japanned Steel. 



Novelty Blue Flame 
Oil Cooking Stoves, 




An extra good cooker and 
an economical user of oil. 

The specially constructed 
brass burner causes the air 
to be thoroughly mixed 
with the flame, thus pro- 
ducing a clear blue flame, 
and a very powerful heat. 

Safety wick adjuster. 

Oil tank is situated away 
from burners, thus keeping 
oil cool and avoiding any 
odor. 



It is the handiest, because 
it is always ready. 



IVI 



M 



LONDON 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



American Sheet Steel Company 
Battery Park Building 

a York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

W. Dewees Wood Company b 

Planished 1 on 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

H. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

» Si Snlpici Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 

WHY SO MANY ADOPT 




BENNETT'S SHELF BOX. 

They display gords, attract customers, make sales, 
save rcom, keep stock in order, and help f> serve cus- 
tomers quickly — all elements to success. Put ihem in 
now and get ready for the Fall trade. Prices and 
particulars from the patentee and maker, 



J. S. BENNETT, 



20 Sheridan Ave. 



' TORONTO 

N I: Boxei m.de to til your present shelving. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, OIST. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



45 per cent, off; swedes iron burrs, 40 per 
cent, off; copper tivets, 35 per cent.; 
coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. 
carton boxes, 45 per tent. off. 

Cordage — Motionless. We quote : 
Manila, 14 to 14^ c, and sisal, 10J4 tone, 
base. 

Spades and Shovels — Discounts remain 
at 40 and 5 per cent., with trade dull. 

Firebricks — There is some inquiry for 
these for forward delivery. We quote $17 
to 524 per 1,000, as to brand. 

Cement — Unchanged. We quote : Ger- 
man, $2.40 to $2.60 ; English, J2.30 to 
$2.40 ; Belgian, $1.80 to $2.10. 
METALS 

There has been little to report in the 
heavy iron and metal market during the 
past week. 

Pig Iron — Prices are nominal on this 
line, in the absence of any important tran- 
sactions, at $24. 50 to $25, as to size of lot. 

Bar Iron — Forward orders for fair quan- 
tities are reported, but demand from stock 
is very light. We quote $2.35 to $2.40 per 
100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

Black Sheets — Prices are steady, while 
demand is light. We quote the base on 8 
to 15 gauge, $3.10. 

Galvanized Iron — Import orders are 
very backward in this line, contrary to 
what was the case at this time last year. 
We quote : No. 28 Queen's Head, $4.7$ 
to $5.00, and Comet, No. 28, $4.45 to 

$4-7°- 

Ingot Copper — Remains as last reported 
at i7}4c. 

Ingot Tin — Foreign markets are steady 
and prices here remain at 35c. 

Lead — There is no change in lead, which 
is quoted at $4. 15 base. 

Lead Pipe — Very little business is doing 
in the material. We quote : 7c. for 
ordinary and 7J^c. for composition waste, 
with 15 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — The same can be said of iron 
pipe which is unchanged. We quote : %, 

$310 ; #. *3-i° ; #. *3-4o; #,$3-85; 

i. 55-5o; iV> $7-S° '< ll A> S9-IO, and 
2-in., $12.25. 

Tinplates — Business quiet at $4.50 for 
coke and $4.75 'or charcoal. 

Canada Plate — Dull, as last noted. 
We quote : 52's, $3. 25 ; 60' s, $3.35 ; 7s's, 
$3.45 ; full polished, $3.50, and galvanized, 
$4.85. 

Terne Plate — Trade is very dull, with 
the price unchanged at $8.50. 

Swedish Iron — Advices continue firm in 
tone on this material, and we quote $4. 25. 
^ Coil Chain — There are some fair orders 
for forward delivery noted. We quote : No. 
6, I2j£c. No. 5, 11c; No. 4, io#c; No. 3, 
IOC-J V-inch, 8#c. ; 5-16, $5.50 ; ft, 
*S-35 : 7-i6, $5.00 ; ft, $4-75; 9"i6. 



TINPLATES 

"LYDBROOK," "TRYM," 
"GRAFTON," "ALLAWAYS," 
"CANADA CROWN," ETC. 

CANADA PLATES 

" DOMINION CROWN " All Polished. 
"ALLAWAYS" best Half Bright. 
"PONTYPOOL" Half Bright. 
"DOMINION CROWN" Galvanized. 



A. C. LESLIE k CO, 



MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

30 JOHN STREET N. 

-^^^-^ Hamilton, Ont. 

Offer from Store, 
Montreal, Toronto and Hamilton: 

PIG TIN, "Straits" 
INGOT COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
ZINC SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

write for quotations. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ROOFING 

PITCH and 



REFINED 
GAS TAR 



We have a few hundred bbls. 
of each to offer at close prices. 



THE 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED 



TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



WE HAVE A LARGE AND FULLY ASSORTED 
STOCK OF 

i 

Harvest Tools 



Forks, 
Rakes, 
Hoes, 
Scythes, 



Snaths, 
Spades, 
Shovels, 
Etc., 



and will guarantee prompt shipment from 
warehouse for immediate orders. 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



$4.70; #, 84-35; %* #4-25 ; Vi> #4-2o, 

and 1 inch, $4.. 10. 

Sheet Zinc— Quiet, at 7 to 7#c. 

Antimony — Continues the same, at 
ioj^c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There have been few features to note in this 
market during the week. Prices, as a rule, 
are firm, the only exception being seal oil, 
which is somewhat lower than last week. 
Castor oil, on the other hand, shows a 
stronger feeling. Linseed has been firm at 
the rise, and on mixed paints the strong 
disposition that we have already noted, con- 
tinues. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 86.75 ; No. 1, 86.37^ ; No. 2, 
$6; No. 3, 85-62^, and No. 4, 85-25. all 
f.o.b. Montreal, prompt cash. 

Dry White Lead — 85-75 in casks; kegs, 
86. 

Red Lead — Firm; casks, 85- 10; in 
kegs, 85-35- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6^c.;in oil, pure, oci; No. 1, 7^c. 

Putty -We quote : Bulk, 8i-95 ; blad- 
ders, in bbls., 82.10; bladders, in cases, 
82.25; in tins, 82.35 to 82.60. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 84c. ; boiled, 
87c, five to nine-barrels, ic. less, ten 



and twenty-barrel lots open, net cash, plus 
2C. for 4 months. Delivered anywhere in 
Ontario between Montreal and Oshawa at 
2c. per gallon advance and freight allowed. 
Turpentine — Single barrels, 68c. ; two to 
four barrels, 69c. ; five barrels and over, 
open terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — Firm ; $ 1 . 20 to $ 1 .40 per 
gallon. 

Castor Oil — Firm; 8%" to 9 %c. in whole- 
sale lots, and %c. additional for small lots. 
Seal Oil — 4.7 j4 to 49c. 
Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c. 
Paris Green — Demand fair at firm prices ; 
i-lb. packets, 19XC., and drums, i8j£c. 

Naval Stores — A more active busi- 
ness has been done in naval stores, and 
prices generally rule steady. Resins, 
82.75 to 84-5°, as to brand; coal tar, 
83.25 to 83-75 ; cotton waste, 4^ to 5>£c. 
for colored, and 6 to 7j£c for white 
oakum, 5^ to 6}4c, and cotton oakum, 
10 to lie. 

GLASS. 
This market continues quiet and feature- 
less. We quote as follows : First break, 82; 
second, 82. 10 for 50 feet ; first break, 100 
feet, 83.80; second, 84 ; third, 84-5° ; 
fourth, 84-75 '< fifth > #5- 2 5 ; sixth, 85-75, 
and seventh, 86.25. 



PETROLEUM. 

Unchanged: We quote: " Silver Star," 
jobbers, i6j£c. ; retail, i7^c. ; " Imperial 
Acme," 17^ and i8^c; " S. C. Acme," 
i9and2oc; "Astral," 20 and 21c. 
HIDES. 

As last quoted : Beef hides, 8c. for No. 
1 ; 7c. for No. 2, and 6c. for No. 3. Calf- 
skins, 9c. for No. 1, and 7c. for No. 2. 

MONTREAL NOTES. 

The Canada Paint Co. are experiencing 
a sensational inquiry for their new brand of 
liquid floor paints, " The Khaki." The 
color seems to have "caught on," as the 
Yankees say, and the departure from the 
stereotyped yellow floor paints is much 
appreciated. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 6, 1900. 

HARDWARE. 

THE wholesale hardware trade does not 
present any particularly new features 
since our last review. If anything, 
the volume of business is a little better, and 
quite a lot of letter orders have been coming 
in since the beginning of the month. Pay- 
ments are, on the whole, fair. The most 
unsatisfactory feature about the situation at 
the moment is the poor crop outlook in 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



s 



Manitoba. There is very little being done 
in barbed or galvanized wire, and busi- 
ness is not as active as it was in oiled 
ar, ) annealed wire. Wire nails are 
quiet. There is very little doing in cut 
nails. Horseshoes and horse nails are 
both quiet. Business in screws, bolts, 
rivets and burrs is steady, (^uite a few 
harvest tools are going out, and a little 
is being done in spades and shovels. ( )aite 
a few screen doors and windows are going 
out, and a little is being done in green wire 
cloth. A nice business is to be noted in 
cutlery, and some shipments are being made 
in guns. A moderate business is to be noted 
in rope, and, while in binder twine business 
is not active, a better trade is looked for later 
in the season on account of the lightness 
of stocks in retailers' hands. 

Barbed Wire — A few orders are coming 
jn, but business in this line amounts to very 
little. Prices are unchinged at last week's 
decline. We quote f.o.b. Cleveland $2 95 
if! carlots, and $3.05 in less than carlots ; 
f.o.b. Toronto, $3.25 in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — There is very little 
business being done, but prices are without 
change. We quote from Toronto : No. 5, 
$4.52#; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.85; No. 
9, 53.10; No. 10, $4; No. ii, $4.05; No. 
12, 53.25; No. 13, 53-35 ; No - H. *4-4o ; 
No. 15. 55.10; No. 16, 55.15. The f o.b. 
price Cleveland for No. 69 base is 52 80 in 
less than carloads, and 52.70 for carloads. 
Terms are 60 days or 2 per cent. 10 days. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is still 
some business being done in oiled and 
annealed wire, but the demand continues 
to fall off. In hay baling wire there is 
practically nothing doing. The base price 
is unchanged at 53 10 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Although business ap- 
pears to be a little better than it was, there 
is still but very little doing in wire nails. 
The base price is unchanged at 53.10 for 
carlots and 53- 20 for small lots. 

Cut Nails — There is scarcely anything 
doing in cut nails. The price remains as 
before at 52.85 base Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Belleville. 

Horseshoes — Trade is quiet and feature- 
less and prices without change. We quote 
f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph : 
No. 2 and larger, light, medium and heavy 
iron shoes, 5405 ; snow shoes, 54-3o ; 
light steel shoes, 54-35 '< featherweight 
shoes, all sizes, 55-6o. No. 1 and smaller, 
light, medium and heavy iron 9hoes, 54.30 
per keg ; iron snow shoes, 54-55; light steel 
shoes, 54- 60; featherweight steel shoes, all 
sizes, 55.60. 

Horse Nails— These are also decidedly 
quiet. Discount 50 per cent, on standard 
oval head, and 50 and 10 per cent, on 
Acadia. 



Our Handsome 
Sheet Metal Fronts 

GIVE SPLENDID 
SATISFACTION. 




eluding 
well as durable. 



We make them complete to suit buildings 

cornices, door and window caps, etc. 
They are easily applied, cost but little, an 

and of fine appearance. 
They're extensively used for improving old buildings as well as for new ones. 
Estimates given on receipt of outline showing shape and measurements of 

your building. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited »»«■- Toronto. 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 



Screws — A good steady trade is still to 
be noted in screws. We quote : Flat 
head bright, 80 per cent, off the list ; round 
head bright, 75 per cent.; flat head brass, 
75 percent.: round head brass, 67 >£ per 
cent.; flat head bronze, 67 >£ per cent. ; 
round head bronze, 62 %, per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Trade is keeping up 
well in this line and prices remain as before. 
We quote: Norway bolts, full, square, 
65 per cent.; common carriage bolts, all 
sizes, 50 per cent. ; ditto, full square, 65 per 
cent. ; machine bolts, all sizes, 52 j£ 
per cent. ; coach screws, 65 per cent. ; 
sleighshoe bolts, 70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 
52X percent.; bolt ends, 62^ per cent.; 
nuts, square, 3^c. off; nuts, hexagon, 4c. 
off; tapping nuts, 60 per cent.; tire bolts, 
60 per cent.; stove bolts, 60 and 10 per 
cent. ; plough bolts, 50 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — Trade is steady but 
without any new feature. We quote : Car- 
riage section, wagon box, rivets, etc. 50 per 
cent. ; black M rivets, 50 per cent. ; iron 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper rivets, 35 per 
cent. ; bifurcated, with box, 5 -lb, carton 
boxes, 30c. per lb. 

Enameled Ware — As is usual at this 
time of the year, a good business is being 
done in enameled ware, particularly in pre- 
serving kettles. 

Rope — A fairly good business is being 
done in rope, although the orders are not, 
as a rule, large. A little hay fork rope is in 
demand this week. The base price is 
unchanged, at uc. for sisal, and 15c. for 
manila. 

Binder Twine — Business is not brisk, 
but a better trade is looked for later on as 
stocks in the country are not, as a rule. 



large. We quote pure sisal at gyic, mixed 
at ioc, and pure manila (650 yards), 13c. 

Spades and Shovels — There are a few 
going out, but trade is not active. Dis- 
count, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Harvest Tools — Scythes, Snaths, 
cradles, and goods of that sort are going 
out well. Discount, 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Poultry Netting — A little is being done 
in a sorting-up way at the discount of 40 
and 5 per cent. 

Ice Cream Freezers— The demand for 
ice cream freezers is still good. Trade in 
this line is keeping up remarkably well. 

Screen Doors and Windows — These 
are still going out fairly well for this time of 
the year, but trade is evidently pretty well 
over as far as the wholesale trade is con- 
cerned. 

Green Wire Cloth — Much the same 
remarks apply to this line as to screen doors 
and windows, for, although there is still 
some business being done, the trade is 
evidently pretty well supplied. 

Cutlery — Some nice sorting-up orders 
have been received during the week, and 
among the shipments made have been some 
fairly good ones to British Columbia. 

Sporting Goods— There are some guns 
going out this week, but they are principally 
on account of orders previously taken. 

Cement — Though the local market has 
slackened since last week, there is still a 
heavy demand both here and at outside 
points at unchanged and steady prices. We 
quote as follows in barrel lots : Cana- 
dian Portland, 52.80 to 53 ; Belgian, J2.75 
to 53; English do., 53; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, 51.25 to 5150 ; calcined plaster, 
51.90 ; asbestos cement, 52.50 per bbl. 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Gas and Oil Stoves'— The demand for 

[**tk i gas stoves is falling off. The same may be 

■ V' said in regard to'iipil stoves. The demand 

for the latter has been particularly good this 

season and the wholesale trad'e-i^ looking 

^*^*"-for a little further spurt. "^ tfca.- 

Fall SPECiALTiESr-There h&ve^been 
quite a few shipments the past week of 
lanterns and elbows, orders for which were, 
in some instances, booked fovfr or 'five 
months ago for shipment on JulV i. »W"? 
METALS. ^ ■ 

No particularly striking features. have de- 
veloped during the past week, although tin 
has been characterized by a good deal of 
firmness. The demand has been most 
active in tinplates and galvanized sheets. 

Pig Iron — The market is still weak, 
although buyers report that when they want 
to purchase they cannot procure supplies at 
as low prices as the condition of the market 
would seem to warrant. One large Cana- 
dian buyer, who has had a surplus for sale, 
does not appear to be as anxious to sell as 
he was a few weeks ago. The nominal 
price for No. i Foundry iron is $22.50, and 
for No. 2, $22. 

Bar Iron — There is very little doing, 
and the feeling is rather easy in regard to 
prices. We quote $2.30 to $2.35 base. 

Hoop Steel — A steady trade is to be 
noted at $ 3. 25 base. 

Pig Tin — The market has ruled strong, 
and local quotations are ic. higher at 36c. 
per lb. There is some difference in the 
reports of jobbers in regard to the demand, 
some experiencing a good business while 
others say that their experience is somewhat 
to the contrary. 

Tinplates — There is a good demand for 
tinplates, and the quantities going out are 
of fair proportions. There is no change in 
prices. 

Tinned Sheets — Trade has picked up 
considerably during the past week, although 
the movement is not yet large. 

Galvanized Sheets — Trade is, on the 
whole, fairly good, and apparently rather 
better than it was a week ago. Prices 
remain unchanged at $5. 10 for English, and 
$4.75 for American. 

Black Sheets — Trade has been good 
during the past week, and prices unchanged, 
the base figure still being $3.60. 

Iron Pipe — The important feature in 
regard to iron pipe is the fixing of a uniform 
discount and the abolition of the net figures. 
Discounts are now as follows : Black pipe, 
)l to Yi inch, 40 per cent.; y z inch, 60 per 
cent.; % to 2 inch, 66% per cent.; larger 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent. Galvanized pipe: 
^ inch, 40 per cent. ; ^ to 2 inch, 50 per 
cent. These prices are for carlots and f.o.b. 
Montreal. For small lots, 10 per cent, is 
added. The demand for iron pipe is a 



little better than it was, although the volume 
of business is not large. 

Lead Pipe — Business is fair. We quote 
7c. per lb., with discount 15 per cent., 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

Lead — There has been more inquiry for 
lead, and a better business has been done. 
We quote 5 to S/4 C - P er lb- 

Solder — While trade has slackened off 
a little during the past week, business is 
fair. We quote : Half-and half, 21 to 22c. 
per lb.; refined, 20 to 21c, and wiping, 20 
to 2o^c. 

Antimony — The demand is moderate. 
We quote: Cookson's 11 to n^c per lb. 

Canada Plates — There is practically 
nothing doing in Canada plates, hut prices 
are as before. We quote : All dull, $3- 50 ; 
half-polished, $3 60, and all bright, $4. 

Copper — A little trade has been done 
during the past week in ingot copper and 
there has been a fair demand for sheet 
copper. We quote ingot at ig}4 to 20c, 
and sheet at 23 to 23^c. 

Brass — Trade is a little more active in 
this line. Discount on roll and sheet is still 
10 per cent. 

Zinc Spelter — Business has been moder- 
ate in this line during the past week. We 
quote 7 to 7%c. per lb. 

Sheet Zinc — Trade has been good in 
this line, although it is more in the way of 
future delivery than for prompt shipment. 
A few orders have been booked during the 
past week for cask lots, shipments to be 
made September 1. We quote : 7,^c. per 
lb. for casks, and 7^c. per lb. for part 
casks. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The market has opened up fairly well for 
the present month. There is a brisk demand 
for paris green, and liquid paints have 
become stiffer, though neither have changed 
in price. Reports from England show a 
possibility of higher prices in linseed oil, as 
a great scarcity is expected, and the price it 
is sold for to day is equal to the cost to lay 
down from Liverpool. Prices are thought 
by some dealers, likely to be maintained until 
September, when Canadian oil should be 
plentiful. Present rates as quoted from 
Liverpool make raw oil cost 87c. net cash 
in Toronto. Some Canadian buyers have 
disposed of their purchases in England 
instead of shipping them to Canada, as oil 
bought early in the season over there can be 
sold again to great advantage at present 
prices. Turpentine fluctuates a little but 
there is a feeling that bottom prices have 
been reached. We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.87j£; No. 1, 56.50; No. 2, #6.12^ 
No. 3, $5.75; No. 4, $5 ; dry white lead is 
casks, $5.75. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON \ 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.V. 

DERBY SIS A P. 

With Plated Rust Proof 
and Guarded Spring. 

" THE LATEST AND BEST." 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS, 

SM^KJS ^-^5?Large«t Variety, 
at/J*' Z^ — s'/l Toilet, Hand, Electric Powerf 

-/ARE THE BEST. 

Higheit Quality Grooming and 
Sheep Shearing Machine. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB CATALOGUZ TO 
lai.rleaa Shearer *Tg. r«., Ifaahna. H.TI..C8* 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of'ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 



BURMAN & SONS', LIMITED 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over i teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Rnssia'sStables and Field Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 

Petrolia, Ont 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

On gale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






lb., $5.50 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75; 
No. 1, in casks of 560 lb. ,55 to 55.25; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $5.25 to ^5.50. 

Charge and Orange Mineral — 
Litharge, 6 to 6}4c. ; orange mineral, 8 
to 8 'Ac 

WhiteZinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to 57.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb.; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22>£c. ; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., 52.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, 52.15 ; bulk, in bbls., 
51.95 ; bulk, in less quantities, 52.10. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, 51 90 
per barrel. 

Paris Green — Petroleum, bbls., 18c. ; 
arsenic, kegs, i8#c. ; drums, 50 and 100 
lb. i8^c. ; drums, 25 lb., iq#c ; tins, 1 
lb., 2o^c. ; tins, }4 lb. 22^c; packages, 1 
lb., iq^c ; packages, y£ lb., 2i^c. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 52. 50 per cwt. 
n barrels, and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less quan- 
tity ; lump, ioc. in small lots, and 8c. in 
barrels. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, 51.20 to 51.30 per 
gallon ; No 1 quality, 51.00 per gallon. 

Seal Oil — 54c. per gallon, and yellow 
seal at 45c. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 
to ioj^c. per lb. and 10^ to uc. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
86c; boiled, 89c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 85c; 
boiled, 88c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, Guelph and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 71c; two 
to four barrels, 70c, delivered to outside 
points. Toronto, Hamilton, London, Sarnia, 
Walkerville, Chatham, Dresden. Wallace- 
burg and Amherstburg, 2c less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

There is a better movement this week, a 
good number of import orders arriving. 
Prices are unchanged, however. We quote 
first break locally : Star, in 50 foot boxes, 
52.25, and 100-foot boxes, #4.00 ; double 
diamond under 25 united inches, 56.00, 
Toronto. Hamilton and London ; terms 
v 4 months or 3 per cent., 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL 
There is nothing doing whatever, the 
market continuing very flat. Prices are 
nominal and unchanged. We quote jobbers' 
prices: Agricultural scrap, 50c per cwt.; 
machinery cast, 50c per cwt. ; stove cast 
scrap, 40c; No. 1 wrought scrap, 50c per 
100 lb ; new light scrap copper, 12c per 
lb. ; bottoms, io^c. ; heavy copper, 12c ; 
light scrap brass, 7c. ; heavy yellow scrap 



84,000 Dally Production. 
5 Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70 % of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I , U S A. 



Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled Choqucred. and Rough Plate Glass. 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plan; 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimah 

Designs on application. 

Works: Ravenhead, St. Helena, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street London. E.G. — 128 Hope Street, Olasgon — 
12 Ka»t Parade, Leeds, and 36 Paradise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: 'Gland, St. Helena.' 1 
68 St Helena. 




brass, ioc ; heavy red scrap brass, ioy£c. ; 
scrap lead, 2|^c. ; zinc, 2J^c ; scrap rubber, 
5c. ; good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c ; 
clean dry bones, 40 to 50c per 100 lb. 
PETROLEUM. 

The market is brisk for the time of year. 
There is not much coal oil. however, and 
prices remain as follows : Pratt's Astral, 
i8c.in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; American 
water white, 18c. in barrels ; Photogene, 
I7^c; Sarnia water white, 17c in barrels; 
Sarnia prime white, 16c. in barrels. 
COAL. 

There is a good market, quite a number 
of shipments being made. There is an ad- 
vance of about 25c. per gross ton this week 
for July shipments. Our quotations for 



anthracite on cars at Buffalo and bridges 
are: Nut, egg and stove, £4. 50 per gross ton, 
or >4.oi per net ton ; grate, #4.25 per gross 
ton, or $3.79 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

A great scarcity of linseed oil is expected. 
Pig tin is ic per lb. higher at 36c per lb. 
Coal is 25c higher per gross ton for July 
shipments. 

Wrought iron pipe is now quoted at dis- 
count figures instead of net prices. 



The Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C., 
are being enlarged and new machinery and 
stock are being put in by their new owner, 
Andrew Cray. 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 2, 1900. 

TRADE is very fair, considering the 
state of doubt the country is in. The 
only price changes for the week are 
decline in rope. Manila is now quoted at 
$15, and sisal at $11.50. Discount on files 
is now 70 and 10. We quote : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire 10 



Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg. 
16 and 20 
10 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy. ... 
20 to 40 
10 to 16 



13 
IS 



00 
00 

5° 
12 

19 

2S 
40 

52 
65 
00 



A 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 OS 

4 10 



Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p. c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p. c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 40 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 10 p.c. 

C.F. military Net. 

Loaded shells, Robin Hood, M $20 00 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 2300 

American, M 16 25 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 7 25 

Chilled 7So 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Robin Hood 10 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

Turpentine, by barrel 87c. 

Less than barrel 89c. 



*££ 



•rf^ 



/• 



I 



go 

65 

5 15 

4 9° 

5 20 

4 95 



8 50 

13 00 

3 5° 

3 75 

4 00 

4 25 
4 5° 



HorsenSWs»_4S per centaHSscmnt. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. oyo No 1. . 

No. 2 anAjArger . . . 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Bar iron, $3.10 basis. 

Swedish iron, $5 basis. 

Tool steel, Black Diamond", 100 lb v.^ 

Jessop .*.*•«, 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, ioo^b.. 

20 to 26 gauge 

28 gauge 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . 

18 to 22 gauge 1 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box n 00 

IX 13 00 

1XX " 15 00 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 9 00 

Broken lots 9 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 4 50 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch ... .50 and 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 45 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger n 50 

# 12 00 

" l /i and 5-16 1250 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 15 00 

H 15 5° 

" % and 5-16 1650 

Solder 25M 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 16 

Axes, chopping $ 7 00 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " 70 p.c. 

Flat " brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 5-16 and smaller 42K p.c. 

H and larger 37 14 p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 55 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 37^ p.c. 

Copper, No. 8, lb 33 %c. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 



Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Octagon extra. . . . 

No. 1 

Linseed oil, raw, per gal. 
boiled " 



doz. 



ELASTIC CARBON PAINT. 

The Atlantic Refining Co., of Toronto, 
manufacture a paint which, for all-round 
durability, is certainly very hard to excel. 
The "Elastic Carbon ' paint, as it is 
called, is guaranteed to be both fire and 
water-proof. Used on any material whatever, 
itjjrevents rustfrom forming, and can be 
* -usfctjfsatisfac^uv^fr^a a^cj i leaks or holes. 
As its name implies, its elastic properties 
keep it from being affected by changes in 
climate. In making old roofs water-proof 
this paint does wonders, arid is guaranteed 
to last on a rpof five years. It is made 
altogether in black, 'avolor suitable to roof- 
ing, metal work, etc., and is manufactured 
«ready for use, requiring no mixing or thin- 
^Jidgj* SoTWaaLis claimed and guaranteed 
.for this v pairR^that one cannot doubt its 
wonderful prop^-He* The Atlantic Refin- 
ing 'Co. have now been manufacturing it for 
three years, and a large number of testi- 
monials from those who have used it is the 
result. It is rapidly growing more and 
more popular all over the country, as may 
be deduced from the fact that The Atlantic 
Refining Co. have just shipped several car- 
loads to British Columbia and to Nova 
Scotia. 



MACHINISTS' WAGE SCALE. 

The decision of Col. John I. Davidson, 
who was arbiter in the matter of machinists' 
wages in Toronto, has been given out, and 
is in effect, as follows : That 10 per cent, 
increase should be paid, that a minimum 
rate of 20c. per hour should be established, 
and that ail work overtime should be paid 
for at the rate of time and a quarter up till 
12 o'clock, and double time after that; 
Saturday afternoons to be considered over- 
time. This award is binding on both sides 
for one year. 



$2 5° 
So 
25 

6S 
25 



78 



G. Vallance, of Wood, Vallance & Co., 
wholesale hardware dealers, Hamilton, Ont., 
is, in company with Mrs. Vallance and the 
firm's British Columbian representative, 
making a tour through the Pacific Province. 




' ' Fortunes are made by 
"a pioneer who provides for 
"the public something it lacks 
* ' and yet requires, " 

The country demands a 
change in the color of 



FLOOR 
PAINT 



The New Color 



KHAK 



is a rapid seller — 

Covers well- 
Does not show the Dust- 
Durable and Permanent. 

The 

IDEAL PAINT for 

lasting qualities and 
economy. 



SOLE MAKERS 




cot 

LIMITED ' 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"°? 




Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 



AUCTION SALE. 



Kingston 
Locomotive Works 

Ilia Real Estate, Plant and Machinery ot 

THE CANADIAN LOCQMOUVE 4 ENGINE 

COMPANY, Limited, 

in Liquidation, situate in the City of Kingston, 
Ontario, will be offered for 

SALE BY AUCTION 

At 3 p.m., on ... 

TUESDAY, m JULY NEXT 

on the premises, Ontario Street, with the approba- 
tion of His Honor, Judge Price, Official 
Referee ; by J. A. Salter, 
Auctioneer. 

The property, comprising about 201,600 square feet, is 
most admirably situated in the centre of the business part 
of the city and consists of the following substantial stone 
buildings : Machine shop, 204 x 55, two storey; erecting 
shop, 122 x 63, two storey ; smithy, 148 x 73, high ; mould- 
ing shop, 123 x 73, high ; boiler shop, 180 x 50, two storey ; 
carpenter shop, 141 x 8o, one storey and scaffolding i n 
part ; store house, 80 x 64, two storey ; wooden buildings 
paint shop, 62 x 18, two storey ; iron clad tank shop, 202 x 
C0| liit^li ; iron clad coal and coke shed, one storey ; (th" 
foregoing dimensions are approximate) ; with fine docks 
good railway connection and wiih a plant specially adapted 
for building locomotives, engines, boilers, also for general 
engineering and foundry work. 

The purchaser shall pay a deposit of $4,000, one-third 
of the purchase money is to be paid within one month 
thereafter, and the balance at end of six months with 
interest fiom date of sale. 

There will be one reserve bid. 

Further terms and conditions to be made known at time 
of sale. 

Particulars, with plans, inventories, etc., may be 
obtained at the Works, Kingston, or on application at the 
office of Kiddell & Ccmpany, Merchants Rank Building, 
Montreal. 

A. F. RIDDELL, (27) 

K. \V. BLACKWELL, 
Dated June 10, 1900. Joint Liquidators. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 



CANADIAN PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU, 

5'5 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QIE 
Telephone Main 1255. 

2fi Fr.mt St. West. Toronto. Telephone 2148 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 



Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamocd Stove Back. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 

Patented Man h Hih, 1899 



11111111111111111 

~ OlAMONO tJtTTNSIOK FRONT CRrfTT'i 

linn 1 11 




liXTENDIJD. 



For Sale by Jobbers of Hardwar*. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, I .8. A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

WORCESTER, MASS., U. S. A. 

Makers of 




:;^z REVOLVERS 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE. 

For sale by Sporting Goods and 
Hardware Stores almost everywhere 



TRADE 




MARK 



ATobles 8f Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STANFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 



Manufacturers of 



HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



STANLEY'S ADJUSTABLE 

Beading, Rabbet, Slitting and Matching Plane. 

"A Planing Mill within itself, "—says a Country Carpenter. 



n 



Ufs 



f 



f] 




No. 45. Nickel Plated Stock and Fence, with Twenty Tools, Bits, etc., $8.00 
SOLD BY ALL HARDWARE DEALERS. 

BROWN'S PATENT STEEL WIRE CHAIN, 

PATENT NO. 32840. 




If you are interested in chains examine carefully the perfect mechanical construction of the Brown's. It is the most 
perfect chain made. We make it in i ^ sizes. We use it exclusively in all our Halter, Dog, Tie-out, Cattle, Trace 
Chains, etc. You will make no mistake in handling our line exclusively. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., LIMITED 

Hamilton and Montreal. 



42 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOOD CHEER 



a 



9 9, 



G 



R 



«£§• *J£ «£§» «c55 <J£ «^5 «^8 




LINE OF 

Ranges 
Coal Cooks 
Wood Cooks 
Base Burners 
Todd Heaters 
Round Oaks 
Air Tights 



Etc., Etc. 



<j£ «s5* «^» <j£ <j£ <J£ <J£ 



Guaranteed first-class in 
every particular. 



New Catalogue now in printer's hands. Write 
us for a copy if you wish to handle the 
LEADERS for 1 900. 



MANUFACTURED BY- 



THE JAS. STEWART MFG. CO. 



REPRESENTED BY. 



LIMITED 



WOODSTOCK, ONT. 



J. H. ASHDOWN, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent andMetal Broker 

13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

representing British and American manufacturers ot 
rinplatei, Tinned bhcew>, Terne Plates, Canada PlatesGal- 
? anized Sheets, Imitation RussiaSheets, Mark Sheets— Iron 
and Steel— Hoops and Bands, Proved Coil Chain, Brass and 
Cippar Sheets, Norway Iron and Steel, Wheelbarrows.etr. 




VanTnyl ft Fairbank 



Potrolla, Out. 
Headquarters for . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps. Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools. Cables, etc. 







E.T. WRIGHT & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



(Si 

< 



"JARDINE" 

TIRE UPSETTERS 



-»«A 



WILL UPSET TIRES 

Some machines sold as Upset ters will not. 
Perhaps you make as much money on the 
sale of a useless Upsetter as on a good 
one, but your customer does not. He 
don't waat a machine beoause it Is called 
an Upsetter he wants a machine to upset 
tires. Sell him one of ours. 

IT PAYS TO 8ELL THE BEST TOOLS 



B. JARDINE & CO. 
HESPELER, ONT. 



■•-• ........ M ... .......>........>.....^.^......^....^^.. J ..^^^..... 

PERFECTION VENTILATOR 

New, Simple, Ornamental Effective 
and Storm Proof. The REM mi NO 
to produce perfect ventilation. 

\\ KIT I, BOB THICKS TO 




BERGER BROS. CO. 

231-237 Arch St.. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Patented Kcl). 28. 18'.I9. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Babbitt Metals . . . 
Tinners' and Plumbers' Solder 
Ingot Brass, etc. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

Pig Tin, Pig Lead 
Ingot Copper . . 
Antimony, etc. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. Facor,K 



and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. §5^¥J^™i; 




STEVENS FINE TOOLS 



We make a perfect line 



ot- 



CALIPERS and DIVIDERS 

Also such tools as Surface Gauges, Tool Makers' 
Clamps, Center Punches, etc. 

Write for our New Catalogue containing a description of our Tools. It is also 
a valuable handbook of information for mechanics and people interested in 
such lines. • 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 

P.O. Box 216. Chlcopee Falls, Masa., U S.A. 
Carried by our representatives at Toronto and Montreal. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Band Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored, Tennis and Fly Nets, 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twine*. 



44 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINNIPEG TRAVELERS' PICNIC. 

The travelers of Winnipeg and their 
families enjoyed their first annual outing on 
June 25. It took the form of a picnic at 
Elm Park, and was a decided success in 
everyway. A programme of sports, etc., 
was enthusiastically entered into. One 
feature of the day's outing was a baby 
show, in which three happy papas under- 
took the very trying work of judging be- 
tween the infant competitors. The success 
of the picnic was due, in a great measure, 
to Mr. J. H. Dickie, president of the asso- 
ciation ; Mr. J. Home, vice-president, and 
Mr. A. Veitch, the treasurer. After supper, 
speeches by the president and Mr. D. M. 
Home wound up the day's outing, and the 
party returned to the city. 



THE HUSTLER. 



If you toot your little whistle 

And then lay aside your horn, 
There is not a soul will ever know 

That such a man was born. 
The man who owns his acres 

Is the man who plows all day, 
And the man who keeps a-humping 

Is the man who makes it pay. 
The man who advertises 

With a short and sudden jerk 
Is the man who blames the printer 

Because it didn't work. 
The man who gets the business 

Uses brainy printers' ink. 
Not a cutter and a splutter, 

But an ad. that makes you think, 
And who plans his advertisements 

As he plans his well-bought stock, 
Has the future of his business 

Just as solid as a rock. 

— American Stationer. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN 
PRODUCTS. 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
recently received the following inquiries : 

1. A manufacturer of brass furniture and other 
fittings, asks for names of Canadian importers who 
would be willing to handle these lines. 

2. A Hull, Yorkshire, firm of fruit importers 
would like to hear from Canadian shippers of 
apples and other fruit, for which they report a good 
distributing market. 



HORSE SENSE IN ADVERTISING. 

There is a bicycle (I don't remember the 
name of it) that has been very largely ad- 
vertised as the "go-lightly" kind. 

I don't know what kind of a wheel it is, 
whether it is good, bad, or indifferent, but I 
wouldn't ride one as long as it was adver- 
vertised in such a silly fashion. The ex- 
pression is really meaningless. There are 
so many good bicycles that it cannot be 
truthfully said that any one is distinctly the 
most easy running. 

The " go-lightly kind " is a toy expres- 
sion. It must have originated in the alleged 



brain of a man who is continually trying to 
do something smart. 

Smartness isn't good advertising. Some 
of the smartest things are the worst adver- 
tising. Good, old, hard horse sense is the 
best thing to use in advertising. It wins in 
the long run, and it frequently wins in the 
short run, loo. — Chas. A. Bates. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 




I, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 



AND 



Root 

THE OAKVILLE 
BASKET CO. 



O EALED TENDERS addressed to the unde:*~2 ed > 
*-^ and endorsed " Tender for Dredging, Collinj» d, 
Ont. ," will be received at this office until Friday, the - .h 
July, 1900, inclusively, for dredging in the Harbour of 
Collingwood, Ont., according to a plan and combined 
specification and form of tender to be seen at the office of 
H. A. Gray, Esq , Engineer in charge Harbour and River 
works for Ontario, Confederation Life Building, Toronto, 
on application to the Postmaster at Collingwood, Ont , 
and at the Department of Public Works, Ottawa. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not be 
considered unless made on the forms supplied and signed 
with their actual signatures. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted bank 
cheque made payable to the order cf the Honourable the 
Minister of Public Works, for five thousand ($5 000.00) 
dollars, which will be forfeited if the party decline to enter 
into a contract when called upon to do so, or if he fail to 
complete the work contracted for. If the tender be not 
accepted the cheque will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. 

By order, 

JOS. R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, \ 
Ottawa, June 21st, 1900. f 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity from the Department will not be paid for it. (28) 



HOT WATER 
INSTANTLY, 

NIGHT OR DAY. 

Boiling Water 
in a Minute. 
Hot Bath When Wanted 




EWART'S 

"LIGHTNING" 

GEYSER 

FOR GAS OR OIL. 

346 EUSTON ROAD, 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Illustrated Price List Free. 



AS GOOD AS THE 
BEST, AND BETTER 
THAN MOST. 



The Bailey 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, CAN. 



ROUND RE-ACTING V~^ 



WASHER 



Quickest selling Washing Machine on the 

market. 
None more satisfactory to dealers or users. 
Every home requires a good Washing 

Machine. 
Every Merchant should handle them. 
Prices and full particulars on application. 



THE 



Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 

Limited. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents : W. L. Haldimand & Son, 
Montreal, Que. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA IRON FURNACE GO., 

Limited 
Manufacturer of 

Charcoal Pig Iron 

MONTREAL. 

»«» "C.I.F." "SMu 



PLANTS AT 
Radnor Forges, Que, Three Rivers. 

Grand Piles. 



Lac a lac Tortue. 



Geo. E. Drummond, 



Managing-Director and Treasurer 




We Manufacture"^^- 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMER? 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CUHREflT JVtAR^ET QUOTATIONS 



July G, 1900. 
These prices are for such qualities and 

iu unities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of oredit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 

prompt pay. Large oash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is anxious to b6 informed at once ol 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
js to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb 33 

Struits '. 35 

Tinplates. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M. L.S. , equal to Bradley. Per boi 

I.C., usual sizes $7 00 

IX., " 8 50 

I.X.X., " 10 00 

Famous— 

JX 85) 

IX X 9 50 

Raven 4 Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 25 

I.X., " 6 25 

I.X.X. " 7 25 

I. XXX., " 825 

D.C.. 12V4xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 SO 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. , usual sizes 4 CO 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 85 

20x28 9 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 9 50 

I.X., Terne Tin 1150 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb 

X X., 14x56, 50sheetbxs ) 

" 14x60 " C 07 07'/, 
•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge OS 08'/, 

26 " 08'/ 2 09 

" 28 " 09 09'/ 2 

Iron and Steel. 

Base Price 

Common Bar per 100 lbs 2 30 2 35 

Kenned " " .... 2 85 2 90 

Horse Shoe Iron " ' 2 70 

Hocp steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 25 

Swedish " " .... 4 00 4 25 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 70 

Tire Steel 2 83 

Machinery 3 25 

Cast Steel, per lb 10 14 

Toe Calk Steel 3 20 

»tlo|Russian Sheet, per lb 10% 11 

•T'ank Plates, 1-5 and thicker. 3 00 3 25 

Boiler Rivets 4 50 5 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inch 13 14 

2 " 15 16 

*% " 18 19 

3 " 19 20 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

H Inch 3 25 

3-16 inch 3 40 

Hi noh and thicker 3 25 

Black Sheets. 

lSgaure 3 20 

20 gauge 3 20 

22 to 24 " 3 30 

»> ," 341 

" 360 



Canada Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 50 

Half polished 3 60 

All bright 4 00 

Iron Pipe. 

Discounts are as follows— Black pipe, % to 
% in., 40 per cent. % in., 60 per cent. % to 
2 in., 66'-' :) per cent, larger sizes, 50 and 5 
per cent. Galvanized pipe, % in., 40 per 
cent. 3 4 to 2 in , 50 per cent. Prices are 
f.o.b. Montaeal for car lots ; smiller quan- 
tities, 10 per cent, higher. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G O. Comet. Amer Head 
16 gauge .... 4 50 4 35 

18 to 24 gauge 4 60 4 20 4 50 4 60 
26 " 4 85 4 45 4 50 4 85 

28 " 5 10 4 70 4 75 5 10 

Less than case lots, 15c. per 100 lb. additional 
28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16in. , per 1001b 

% " .... 8 50 

5-16 " " .... 6 00 

% " " ... 5 45 

7-16' " ... 5 15 

% " " ... 5 no 

% " " ... 4 8) 

% " " .... 4 75 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p c 

Stall fixtures 35pc 

Trace chain 25 and 5 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. S, ton lots 19% 20% 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cutlengths, ound,%to%in. 23% 25 
1 round and square 

1 to 2 inches... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
TJntinned ,14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 23 23% 

Cntinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4<6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea.. per lb 25% 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " 23% 

BoilerandT. K. Pitts. 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 
Roll and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge. 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled. 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 07 07% 

Domestic " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt.casks 07% 

Partcasks 07>' 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 05 05% 

Bar, 1 lb 06'/, 

heets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by roll 05\ 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., ' 05% 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cutlengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, istsat 7% cents. 



Shot. 

Common, 86.50 per K0 lb. ; chilled, S7.C0 
per 100 lb.; tuck, seal and bal , $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7V 2 p c Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on medium and extra 
heavy, and 45 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb 

Bar half-and-half 21 22 

Refined 20'/ 2 21 

Wiping 20 20% 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities ol 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brandsvary according to composition. 

Antimony. 
Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Percwt 
Pure, Assoc, guarantee, ground in oil 

25 lb. irons 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50" 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No. 4 do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 ib. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 0(9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks , 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 fO 

No. 1, kegs 6 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 135 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 1 20 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 10 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

FrenchlmperialGreen 19 

Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre ( J. C. I bbls .... 135 140 

Yellow Ochre (J. F.L.S.). bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), percwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, percwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt .. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Olides, percwt 175 2 00 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93 p c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" TTmber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

rinldnn Ochre 03^ 

I'liramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb 07 



1 25 
80 
80 
U 55 



Mortar Color, per 100 lb 

English Vermillion 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45, lb. 

Whiting, per 100 lb 

Bine Ston.. 

Casks, for spraying , per lb 07 

100-lb.lots, do. per lb 08 

Pntty. 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in 100 or 200 lb. kegs Or bxs 2 25 

Bulk in bbls., per 100 1 95 

Bulk in less quantities 2 10 

25-lb. tins, 4 in case 2 35 

12%-lb. tins, 8 in case 2 60 

Varnishes. 

(In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 8 00 9 U0 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, txtra 2 40 2 80 

No.l 1 60 2 (0 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 400 440 

Furniture Brown Japan 1(0 2 10 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Discount— general trade discount, 50 per 
cent, and four months' time : special cash 
discount of 3 per cent in thirty days, or 3% 
per cett. spot cash. 

The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's , Limited 
Elastilite Varnish, 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2 0). 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2 00. 

Maple 1. eaf 
Coach Knamels ; 
Size 1, £0c. : 
Size 2, 35c. ; Si/e 
3, 2Cc. each. 




Linseed Oil. 

Raw. Boiled. 

1 to 1 bbls delivered $0 86 $0 89 

5 to 9 bbls " 85 88 

Montreal. Toronto, Hamilton, Quebec, 

I.ondon, Ottawa, Kingston and Guelph, 
2c. less. 

Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... 77 

S to 4 barrels " " 76 

Toronto, Hamilton, London, Guelph.. ' 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb.. 10 10% 

" " small lots Olt 1 ; 11 

Cod oil. t t. 

CodOil, per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 120 

" Neatsfoot 

GIne. 

Common 08% P 

French Medal OH 14% 

Cabinet, sheet 12 13 

White, extra 1J. 20 

Gelatine '.'2 30 

Strip tU 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner .... 18 



46 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL, PEECH & TOZER,«,"J 

Phoenix Special Steel Works. The Ickles, near Sheffield, England. 

Manufacturers of__^ mmm mtt^L. 

Axles and Forgings of all descriptions, Billets and Spring 
Steel, Tyre, Sleigh Shoe and Machinery Steel. 



Sole Agents for Canada. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition . 

Cartridges. 
B B. Caps. Dom., 50 and 5 percent. 
Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 45 p. o., Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Rim Fire, Military.net list, Amer. 
Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 18 P.O. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom- 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mill 

tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 

net list. B. B. Caps, discount 45 per cent. 

Amer. ,,_ ,, 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 

"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent. Rival 

and Nitro, 10 p.c. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 and 10 percent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags "■•■■•■-•••:- 1 uu 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, m 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge ,•••'• ° ib 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of oOO each, 8 gauge 5:. 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1.0J0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge. . •■■■»• ° 25 

Thin card wads m boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge. 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each- Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9and It gauges 70 

7and8gauges 90 

5and6gauges. yvv x lu 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each- 

Hand smaller gauge 115 

9andl0 gaugeB 1 40 

7and8gauges 1 b5 

5and6 gauges .. 1 9U 

Adzes . 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Pe , lb 10 12J4 

Anvil "and Vise combined .... 4 5U 

Wilk nson & Co.'s Anvils.. lb. 09 09% 

WilkinsoS&Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 
Augers. 

Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes— 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 0J 

Bench Axes, 40 and 15 pc. 

Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

^sTxef 68 .:::::::::::::.: In I™ 

?,?Ut tina Ax«V 6 50 12 00 

SSSSSS^ie Grease. 7 " » °° 
Ordinary, per gross | 75 6 00 

„. 3 90 4 00 

Conner ' discount 10 and 10 p.c. off revised list 
v Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 
5%-inch rolled rim, MfuJItf.. .... 3000 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

Tandem" A P«lb. 27 

c".'.'. ■'.'.' •••••••• " ° l1 ^ 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

American make, discount 68% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 4S«d 50 per cent. 

G0 ^'|e\1r\^;dUoouni-27y' per cent 00 



Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
uilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07% 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Norway Bolls, full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 50 

" " " full square. . . 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 52% 

Coach Screws 65 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Blank Bolts 52% 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Nuts, square 3%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4c. olf 

Tapping Nuts 60 

Tire Bolts 60 

Stove Bolts 60 and 10 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 50 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% Per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis,No.8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 60 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 80 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 CO 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in, 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulic 1 00 1 10 

Chalk. 
Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red ■ 05 06 

Crayon, per grose 14 18 



Chisels. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 

Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
Churns. 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.511— >o. 2. $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Wa?hout 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Richelieu 4 75 

Emb. Richelieu 5 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 65 

oval, 17 x 14 in 1 55 

" 19x15 in 2 30 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 

American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

"6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. ) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard, dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz l 60 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 27% per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40^>er cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 per cent, to 60. 

10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent 
revised list. 

FRUIT PRESSES. 

Henis', per doz 3 25 3 50 

Shepard's Queen City, dis. 15 per cent. 
GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under 26 2 25 4 00 .... 6 00 

26to40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 ... 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 00 .... 8 50 

61to70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 6 75 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 7 25 .... 14 CO 

91 to 95 15 50 

96 to 100 18 00 

101 to 105 2100 

106toll0 V4 00 

111 to 115 28 00 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. .50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, — per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 08% 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

CroBS-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-f t. run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 21 00 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in. , per lb 06% 

" 5-in., " .... 06% 

" 6-in., " 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in„ " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pair 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. I 

Lird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"C " brand 50 p.c. dis. I_ , . 
"M" brand 50 p.c. f Oval head. 

Acadian, ountersunk head and oval 
top and 10 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. FIRTH & SONS, Limited, SHEFFIELD 

Tfool Steel and Rock Drill Steel 



The Standard for past SO years 

in Canada and United States. 



ALWAYS CARRIED IN STOCK. 




^S 



FIRTH & 



Ef ItLO , 




H. W. DeCourtenay & Co. 

oole Agents for Canada. 476 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 

«S- Always Specify this BRAND When Ordering, "till 




* 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Toronto 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. . 4 05 4 30 

Snow shoes 4 30 4 55 

Steel Shoes. 

Lij, t 4 35 4 63 

Featherweight (all sizes) 5 60 5 60 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Star, per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEY8. 
Lock, Can., dis., 27% p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door. japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, P. 4 L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 1 J per cent. 

UMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 50 

No. 1 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. eitra. 

LEMON SQUEEZER3. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined, 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis. 33 1 g p.c. 
Russell & Erwin, per doz 3 05 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 
English and Am., per doz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 15 to 17% p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Oanlking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS 
Canadian, per doz 8 50 100 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
Oerman, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 85 $4 20 

3d 3 50 3 85 

4 and 5d 3 25 3 70 

6and7d 3 15 3 55 

8 and 9d 3 00 3 35 

10andl2d 2 95 3 30 

16 and 20d 2 90 3 25 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 85 3 20 

Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 185 3 50 



NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 40 and 5 per cent, for McMullen's. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Canada refined (Toronto) 13V4 

Sarnia Water White 15 

Pratt's Astral 18 

Sarnia, Prime White 14 

American w. w 16% 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per tent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 1 50 3 00 

Brass head, " 40 1 00 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 55 per cent. 

American dis. 55. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 37% 

to 40 per cent. 
Bailey's (Stan. R. 4 L. Co.), 50 to 50 and 5p c. 
Miscellaneous, dis. 25 to 27% per cent. 
Bailey's Victor, 25 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 
40 p.c. 

Button s Imitation, per doz. . 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Impression work, discount, 60 per cent. 

Fuller 8 wjrk, discount 65 per cent. 

Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 

Jenkins' disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 

Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 

JenkinB radiator valves, discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis, 60 p.c. 

Ouick opening valves, discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " •' 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No. 4%. •' 3 00 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount, 20 Der cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw o 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS 

Canadian cistern 180 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 1 00 

RANGE BOILERS 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 7 25 

" 35 " 8 15 

40 " 9 25 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

'' 35 ■ 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 

Cast steel and malleable Canadian list dis. 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 



RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Holler's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'s, 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade 4 Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile 4 Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 (JO 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Carriage, Section, Wagon Box Rivets, etc., 

50 p.c. 
Black M. Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets 4 Burrs, 35 p.c. dis., and 

cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets in 

%-lb. cartons, lc. Der lb. 
Burrs, iron or steel, 45 per cent. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. ^ 
ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 
7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 11 15 

%in 12 16 

% and 5-16 in 12% 16% 

Cotton base, %-inch and 

larger M9j 15 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set- 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 85 

" No. 50, nickle-plated.... 90 

Usuil rebate on 12 and 50 (ate lots. 
SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B 4 A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

.SAWS. 
Hand, Disston's, dis. 12% p.o. 
S. 4 IX, 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. 4 D. , dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Solid, " 1 50 

SASH CORD. , 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES 
Gurney Scales, 45 p.c. 
B. S. 4 M. Scales, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
11 Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 80 p.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 75 p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 75 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 67%p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, diB. 67% p.c. 
R.H. " 62% p.c. 

Drive Screws, 80 per cent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

iron, " 4 25 5 75 

SCYTHES. 
Discount, per doz, net SCO 15 00 



B( YT1JE SNATHS 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS 
Bailej Cutlery Co . full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c. 
Seymour s, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Heinisch, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 
Seymour or Heinisch tailor shears. 15 p.c 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 

STAMPED WARE. 

P.ain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 

STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 3 85 

Plain 00 3 60 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 009 009 

Labrador 13 

" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

6 inch Per 100 lengths 8 00 

7 inch " " 8 50 

Stove Polish. 




No. 4— Sdqzen in case, net cash .... $4 80 

No. 6 — 3 dozen in case, " 8 40 

TACK8 BRADS, ETC. 

Per cent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 

Cheese-box lacks, blued 80, 12% 4 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 80 4 12% 

Carpet tacks, blued and tinned . .75 10 4 

" (in kegs) 35 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . .70, 10 4 5 

% weights 55 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 5 

In dozens 70,10 4 5 

8wedes, upholsterers', bulk 80, 12% 4 5 

" brush, blued 4 tinned, bulk. .45 
" gimp, blued tinned and 

japanned 70,10 4 5 

Zinc tacks 30 

Leather carpet 'Acks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52% 



48 



y 

CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF- 



Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 



ALEXANDER GIBB, n „ * *• A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Montreal -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. For other Provinces. 



ta^' 




(% 



^ 



Trunk nails, black 65 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 5 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, dozens 85 

bulk 35 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass akin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chestennan's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 2i p c. 
Game, H. &N.. P. S. & W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 21 

Wrapping, mottled, per pack. 50 60 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb 17 18 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2 1 /, per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire. 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, 83.20 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, ad 



vance 7c. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advance 7c.-No. 11, 14c.— No. 12, 
20c.-No. 13, 35c— No. 14. 47c— No. 15, 
60c— No. 16, 75c Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2 — 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
— springwire, $) — best steel wire. 75c. — 
bright soft drawn, 15c- in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c. — 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 12% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, 85- No. 18, 85.50- No. 19. 86-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, 87— No. 2?, 87.30— No. 23, 
87.65 -No. 24, 88— No. 25, 89— No. 26, 
89.50-No. 27, 810-No. 28 811-No 29, 
812- No. 30, 813— No. 31. 814— No. 32,815 
No. 33, 816— No. 34. 817. Extras net- 
tinned wire. Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
84— Nos. 32-34, 86. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, lPc— in 25-l> . bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c — 
in %-lh. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, 81— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 6, 7, 8, 83.95 
No. 9, 33.20— No. 10, $4.10— No. 11, 84.15 
No. 12, 83 35-No. 13, 83.45— No. 14, 
84.50-No. 15, 85.00— No. 16. 85.25. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 
per 1,000 feet 



3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B 
Galvanized, 4 barb, 2% and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 25 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. . levelatd, .-52.95 in 

Ipss than ca'lots, tnd $3.05 in carlots. 

Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 

Roes braid truss cable 4 50 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . . 2 00 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37H per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 
Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S.,perdoz 5 80 6 00 

G. A K s Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 00 

Royal American " 5U 00 

Discount, 45 per cent.; terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 
Canadian make, discount, 25 per cent. 



ESTABLISHED 
I860 




Aluminum Camping Outs 

Light Durable Compact 

Total weight for 6 men, 3 lbs. 5 ozs. Size of set packed, 10K x 6^ in. 




CLOSED. 



Sets comprised as follows: 



One 8-qt. Pail, \0'/-i-in. diameter, 6Vi-in. deep. 
One 6-qt. Pail, 9-in. diameter, 5'._.-in. deep. 
One 4-qt. Pail, 8-in. diameter, 5-in. deep. 
3 or 6 Cups (loose handles), 3% x 3-in. deep. 
3 or 6 Plates, 9-in. diameter. 

The whole set packs in large pail. Covers for all the pails are suitable 
for Frying pans, Stew pans, etc. 




BEADY FOR USE. 



THE TH0S. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



Sii copy of Phillip* Monthly Mm him-ry 
lining over 5.000 entrlea ol new ami 

hand machinery "f e»erj ■! rlptlon The oldest 

hu<l unci in ist nuccwuiiul medium in (in- world. 
yi Mrs far the imrtioH > of introducing those 
liinery for sale, to tho e who wish to buy, has ■ 
ition of alioul 50,0110 oopii'3 per aunum, nil over the 
ir oontiuual reference by a large Dumber 
of Arms li is consequently a rnosl raluable advertising 
"Vi; engineers and manufacturers Subscription, 
per copy, 8d Sole Proprietor, Oh *~ 
1). l'nii.i irs, M I M >rt, Hon.. England. Tele- 

graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon.' 

ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



WHY sharpen your bar of steel? 
USE only "Aylmer Drills." 
OLD fashioned drills waste time and money. 
WAYS change as inventions multiply 
Send for circular and prices to 
WM. J. CRAWFORD, 
Boom 39, Canada Life Building, M0NTBEAL. 



R. 



C. LeVESCONTE 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc 

The McKinnon Buildino 
Oor. Jordan and Melinda Streets 

. . . TORONTO 

Telephone 689. 

Cable "LeVesconte" Toronto. 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned 
and endorsed " Tender for L-ck and Dam, St. 
Andrew's Rapids, Red River, Man ," will be received 
at this office until Monday, the i6th day of July, rooo, 
for the construction of a concrete Lock and Dam at St. 
Andrew's Rapids, Red River, Province of Manitoba. 

Plans and specifications can he seen at this Depart- 
ment ; at the offices of Mr. Zeph. Mslhiot, re'ident 
engineer of the Department at Winnipeg : Mr. H. A. 
Gray, resident engineer, Confederation Life Building, 
Toronto ; Mr. C. Desjardins. Clerk of Works, Post 
Office, Montreal, and Mr. Ph. Beland, Clerk of Works, 
Post Office, Quebec Forms of tender can also be obtained 
at the above mentioned places. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not 
be considered unless made on the printed forms supplied, 
and signed with their actual signatures. 

The contractor will be required to conform to regula- 
tions to be made by the Governor-General-in-Council, 
respecting the accommodation, medical treatment and 
sanitary protection of the working men employed on the 
work. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted 

ink cheque made payable to the order of the Honour- 
l ifc the Minister of Public Works, equal to ten percent, 
ui the amount of the tender (io p. c. ), which will be 
forfeited if the party decline to enter into a contract when 
called upon to do so, or if he fail to complete the work 
contracted for. If the tender be not accepted tbe cheque 
will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender 

By order, 

JOS. R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 

Department of Public Works of Canada, 
Ottawa, June 13th, igoo. 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity from the Department, will not be paid for it. (27) 



75 reAHS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1823. 



7* YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KI^aK^nCT^a? Ch ' m « ber ' s ' 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices throughout the civilized world. 

Exeoutive Offices : 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY fc'atlien> information that reflects the financial condition and tbe con- 
trolling circumstances of every Beeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, by the 
merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information, no effort Is spared, and no 
reasonable expense considered too great, that tbe re-ultx may justify Its < laim as an authority on all matters affecting 
commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its oflices and connections have been steadily extended, and it furnishes 
Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized « Grid. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiducial y and I usiness corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited* 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY 



Toronto Office : Cor. Melinda and Jordan Sts. 
Hamilton Office : No. 39 James Street South. 
London Office : No. 365 Richmond Street. 



Winnipeg Office : No. 398 Main Street. 
Vancouver Office: Cor. Hastings and Hamilton Sta. 
Victoria Office : Board of Trade Building. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen.-Mgr., Western Canada, Toronto, Ont. 



PERFECTION 
AUTOMATIC 
REVOLVER. 



NEW Automatic shell extracting, 
" & ■* double action, small frame. 
Weighs 12 oz. Rebounding lock. 32 
caliber. 5 shot. 

Made with shorter barrel for bicycle 
use. 

The most perfect small pistol made. 




Forehand 
Arms Co. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



Manufacturers of 
the 

Forehand Guns 

Worcester, 
Mass. 



Hardwood CHARCOAL ..b^o.***, 

WUUU ALOUmUL equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 

Manufactured only by... 

THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., LimiM 

'•««*•{ 1\V,',VJ"" Gooderham Building, TORONTO 




E. B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticks 

PRESTON, 

Ontario, - Canada. 

The Best Stick. 
Made of Rock Elm. 
Wholesale Trade Only Supplied. 
Ask your Wholesale House for 
Che Preston make of Stick. 
Write for Prices. 






1 




: 



Inc. 18»6 



Black Diamond FileWorks 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

i PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve -«*• — »*- Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

-* — w 




THERE ARE A DOZEN DIFFERENT KINDS OF 

Solid rubberTires 

FOR CARRIAGES 



Ninety per cent, of all the 
Rubber Tires in use in New 
York City are the 

"Kelly- 
Springfield." 

HY ? 





PATENTED. 



Manufactured by 



>'%^%%^%%'%^%%^V%^V%^%^%^%^%%^%^%^%^V^%^ 



I 



The Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 

61-63 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO, ONT. 

Factories— 115-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



Ingot Tin, 

"BANCA" 

Ingot Tin, 

"LAMB & FLAG" 

Ingot Copper, 
Zinc Spelter, 
Sheet Zinc, 
Antimony, 
Pig Lead. 

From Stock and to Import. 

Enquiries Solicited. 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 



<v%»*wwwwwwv-*>v»>vwvw 



Galvanized Corrugated Sheets 

"BLAGKWALL" BRAND 






B.&S. H.THOMPSON &C0'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL 



A. WWWWVWWWWV1 v\\\\ 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



NOT FICTITIOUS 

NOR EXORBITANT.— Use 
Langwell's Babbitt. Montreal 



^CA^^ m AM. 



§^> 




The Weekly Organ of the Ha .ware, Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada 



VOL. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO JULY 14, 1900. 



NO. 28 



•TUDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
Tne Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed, 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH 4 McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

Tfu largest smelters of Ant 7- Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




TIME TELLS 

" QUEEN'S HEAD " has been 
before the Canadian trade for thirty years and has proved its 
claim to be the best and most durable iron on the market. 
Other brands have come and gone, but "QUEEN'S HEAD" 
still leads. 

" FLEUR DE LIS" is second only to "QUEEN'S HEAD." 



JOHN LYSA6HT, 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., 



^ 



Limited, 



BRISTOL, ENG . and MONTREAL. 



MONTREAL, 
Managers Canadian Branch. 





! 

i 
1 

! 



s^dojrn ^knocks twice at a man's door — the man 
10 called on you yesterday for advice as to the best 
idiator to install in his house gave you the oppor- 
tunity to make a big advertisement for yourself and 
your store. Did you suggest the " Safford " Radiator 
for Steam or Hot Water Heating? The "Safford" 
absolutely cannot leak, you know. 

This interests you, of course — now, let us send 
our illustrated Booklet to you telling all about our 
original invention in screw-threaded nipple connections 
which has made the "Safford" famous all over the world. Some of Canada's 
largest buildings are fitted throughout with the "Safford," and that's an endorse- 
ment of their perfection that we're proud of. Twenty-five different styles — plain 
or ornamental — to fit circles, curves, angles. Here's your " opportunity " — will you 
take advantage of it ? 



% 



The Dominion Radiator Company, Limited, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



The 

Safford 

Radiators, 



Fishing Tackle 



milMM I M 



TROLLING LINES 
RODS and REELS 
BAIT PAILS 
HOOKS 
LANDING NETS 
DISGORGERS, Etc. 



Sporting Goods 



MMMMMH 



BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

GOLFING 

TENNIS 

CRICKET 

QUOITS 



S 
U 

P 
P 

L 
I 

E 
S 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 

Cor. King and Victoria Sts., 



N 



^31W!!fmmmmmwwwmmmwmmmmmmmn!wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmn!mmm^ 



& 



THE 






Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 



OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 



Manufacturers of 



I Bar Iron and Steel 

| Nails, Spikes 

| Horse Shoes . . 

I Bolts, Washers, etc. 



^ 



Belleville, 
Ontario. 



i 



3 

1 



3 
3 



HUlUUUilUIUIUiUlU^^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




THRESHING 
BELTS 





s£N 







S&? 5 



with these brands 
insure the best 
of wear for the 
money. 



fcf 



London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



The Canadian Rubber 
Co. of Montreal, 



MONTREAL, 




#5* 




TORONTO, X:,»f X *oS 



WINNIPEG. 




SOME OF THE NEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




No. 15 "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT AND LEFT HAND, AND RIGID, WITH FINGER TURN ON BLADE— 2, 3, 4 and 5-in. BLADES. 





(t\ I! '" "VANK 

Ni £^l] SPIRAL SCRt' 



' No. 20 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT HAND ONLY, AND RIGID. 3 SIZES, EXTREME LENGTH OPEN, INCLUDING BIT— 14, 17 and 19-inches. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



iA****AAAA4AAAA*AAAAAAAA*AAA4M 



If You Experience Difficulty 

with other twines 

TRY PLYMOUTH. 

It has maintained its superiority over all other makes ever since the 
self binder was perfected, and despite all competition, has to-day the 
largest sale in Canada of any twine. 

Prudent People Prefer "Plymouth." 



IT PAYS TO BUY 
THE BEST. 




This Trade Mark Is 
on every Tag. 



DISTRIBUTERS: 



PLYMOUTH BINDER TWINE AGENCY, 



54 Bay Street, TORONTO. 



Galvanized Sheets 



"Gordon Crown" 



And. 



"Apollo." 



From Stock or Import. Enquiries Solicited. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



ENGLISH HOUSE: 

164 FENCHURCH ST., E.C., 

LONDON., ENG. 



27 Wellington St. W., 



TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ICE CREAM FREEZERS 

The Latest 
and Best. 

The 
Ideal" 



44 



will make cream in two 
to five minutes, accord- 
ing to quantity. 

SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 
VERY RAPID 
ECONOMICAL 



Write for Circular and 
Prices. 




Wnnd, Vflllflnr.fi ^r,n. ] Hamiitop,ont. 



Branch House : George D. Wood & Co., Winnipeg:, Man. 
Toronto Office: 88 York Street— H. T. Eager. 




B m;M 



WOOD. VALLANCE & CO., 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



GEO. D. WOOD & GO., 

Iron Merchants 

Importers of British and Foreign 

ARDWARE. 

WINNIPEG, Canada. 



CORDAGE . . 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 


Tarred Hemp Rope 


Lathyarn 


Spunyarn 


Sisal Rope 


White Hemp Rope 


Shingleyarn 


Pulp Cord 


Jute Rope 


Bolt Rope 


Bale Rope 


Lobster Marlin 


Russian Rope 


Hide Rope 


Lariat Rope 


Paper Cord 


Marline 


Halyards 


Hemp Packing 


Cheese Cord 


Houseline 


Deep Sealine 


Italian Packing 


Hay Rope 


Hambroline 


Ratline 


Jute Packing 


Fish Cord 


Clotheslines 


Plow Lines 


Drilling Cables and 


Sand Lines 


"FIRMUS" 


Transmission Rope from the finest 


quality Manila hemp obtainable. 




Orders will 


not be accepted for second quality c 


tr "mixed" goods. 





CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



Toronto Branch 27 FBOHT ST. WEST. 
TEL. 94. Wm. B. Stewart, Agent. 



Montrealj Que. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become a^.its for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 
'SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE," 
168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



ECONOMY GASOLINE STOVE 



AND 



QUICK=BAKER OVEN. 

The Stove and Oven that always give perfect satisfaction. No Dust. No Dirt. No Ashes. 
No Waste. No Discomfort. Baking and Ironing in summer a pleasure. 



10 POUNDS 

BREAD 
BAKED FOR 
ONE CENT. 




8 DOZEN 

BISCUITS 

BAKED FOR 

ONE CENT. 



Two-Burner Stove, with Extra Burner for Oven. 

The Quick=Baker is ready for use in seven minutes. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Cannom Stove & Oven Co., Limited 

197 King St., LONDON, ONT. 

We want the trade in all parts of the DOMINION TO HANDLE THIS STOVE AND OVEN. 
LIBERAL TERMS. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



The 



Aiier Gasoline 



LAMP 



100 Candle 
Power. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
OH MONEY REFUNDED. 

Approved by Can. Fire Under- 
writers' Association. 



SEND 

FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



No. I $7.50 

5 STYLES 



AUER LIGHT CO 

MONTREAL 




. . . Defiance 

Cold 

Blast 

Lantern 




With Patent Fluted 
Plate, by which the air is 
admitted so as to come in 
contact with the Globe, so 
tending to keep it cool 

Sold by Leading 
Jobbers. 



Manufactured by. 



W. W. CHOWN & CO. 



Belleville, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



cZaJmtfe** 






. . FULL STOCK 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 




Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER AND CUP 




U. 8. Patent June 26th, 
Canadian Pat Dec. LBto 

Sold by Jobbers of - - - 

HARDWARE 
TINWARE 
and STOVES, 

for furnace pipe, \o support 
the sheet steel blade. 



t rf* 



MannfartiirpH hw THE ADAMS company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
IVIdllUlaUlUI CU UV A . R . wOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



in Bulk or Sacks. 



Hardwood CHARCOAL 

WUUU ALOUnUL equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 

Manufactured only by .. 

THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., UmML 



=•=...„,).., / Fene l° n Falls. 
Factories | De seronto. 



Gooderham Building, TORONTO 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




I Steel Frame Churn 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 



"MAXWELL FAVORITE CHURN" 

PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive. 

| AWN MHWFIK SffStf'VBfi: 

L nil 11 lllUllLlIU, widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Cruci- 
ble Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 



In Four different sizes. 



If your Wholesale House does not 
offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 




UQCfiC*'"- 



Wood Frame Churn. 



MAXWELL MOWER 



8-inch Low Wheel 



: MAXWELL" Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MrAL 
QUICK MEAL 

iff*-™ 

QUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 



a 



** 



Quick Meal 

Summer Stoves 

POPULAR FAVORITES EVERYWHERE. 

PRACTICAL, ECONOMICAL and RELIABLE. 

We are Sole Canadian Agents for these splendid selling stoves, and would 
suggest to any dealer not handling them that there is yet time to send an order and 
obtain a share of the season's trade in these successful goods. 

"Quick Meal" lines include Gasoline as well as the famous Wickless Blue Flame 
Oil Stoves — many sizes and styles in each — offering unequalled excellence. 

Write now for Price List if you haven't one. 

The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited 

LIMITED ' TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER. 



QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MtAb 
OUICK MEAL 
QUICK MBAL 
QUICK MEAL 

mm 

OUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 



THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO 
MONTREAL. 






EEL SINKS 



old Sheet Steel and are Unbreakable. 



They are strong, yet light, which means that you 
will have less freight to pay on them than on the heavy 
cumbersome cast sinks. Every one is neatly and 
smoothly finished. They are provided with strainers 
and connections with brass bolts, which cannot rust out. 
They are made in three styles of finish : 

PAINTED, GALVANIZED AND ENAMELED. 

( 16 x 24 Inch. 
3 Sizes \ 18x30 « 
{18 x36 



n 



WE WILL BE PLEASED TO NAME YOU PRICES. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



Toronto, 
Canada. 




Vol. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 14, IGOO. 



No. 28 



President, 

|OHN BAYNB MacLEAN. 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Cntario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES 

MONTREAL - • ■ - Board of Trade Building, 

Telephone 1155. 

TORONTO 16 Front Street West, 

Telephone 2148. 
LONDON, ENG. - - - - 109 Fleet Street, EX., 

J. M. McKim. 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. - - - 18 St Ann Street, 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N. B. ... No. 3 Market Wharf. 

I. Hunter White. 

NEW YORK. 150 Nassau Street, 

Edwin H. Haven. 

Travelling Subscription Agents : 

T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 

Subscription Canada, $2.00 Qreat Britain, $3.00 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address i £££}£*' *:° nd ™ 
( Adscript, Canada. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE MENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



DECLINE IN CUT AND WIRE NAILS. 

A REDUCTION in the price of both 
cut and wire nails is announced 
this week by the manufacturers in 
Canada. 

In cut nails the reduction is 25c. per keg, 
the base price now being $2.60. 

The reduction in wire nails is 10c. per 
keg. This makes the base price $3 in car- 
lots and $3.10 in less than carlots. 

The differential in the price of cut and 
wire nails is now 50c. per keg, whereas 
before it was only 35c. per keg. 

The price of wire nails is now 40c. below 
the highest point, there having been a 
decline of 30c. per keg early in May, in 



sympathy with the drop of $1 per keg in 
the United States. 

In cut nails, this is the first change that 
has been made since early in January last, 
when the price was raised 25c. to $2 85 per 
keg, so that the figure for cut nails is now 
the same as it was up till the time the 
previous change was made, six months ago. 

There has been no change in the price of 
wire nails in the United Sates since the 
sharp drop of $1 per keg in April last, the 
quotation f.o.b. Pittsburg still being $2 40 
in less than carlots to the retail trade. With 
freight and duty added to that figure, it 
would cost something like $3. 18 to lay down 
Pittsburg wire nails in Canada. 

Wire nails have been moving slowly in 
Canada for some weeks past, people 
evidently holding off in anticipation of a 
decline. Now that the decline has come, 
and no further change is likely for some 
time at any rate, we may naturally expect 
an improvement in business. 



TINPLATES EASIER IN GREAT 
BRITAIN. 

The threatened strike of the men em- 
ployed in the tinplate mills in Wales has 
been averted, an advicejust to hand stating 
that the difficulty between master and man 
had been satisfactorily settled. 

Business is decidedly slow in the tinplate 
trade, and quotations being received by 
Canadian importers indicate a slightly lower 
range of values. So far, however, prices in 
Canada are unaffected. 

According to our exchanges, just to hand, 
some of the works in South Wales are im- 
porting steel bars and steel plates from the 
United States. 



A CONVENIENT TELEPHONE. 

IT is beginning to look as if the ideal 
telephone is to come out of Germany. 
At any rate it is in that country that the 
greatest advance is being made at the 
present time. 

Among the latest inventions is the tele- 
phonograph, the invention of a man named 
Paulsen. As its name indicates, it is a 
combination of telephone and phonograph, 
and the commendable feature about it is 
that it records messages received during the 
absence of the operator. 

For example should A call up B it makes 
no difference whether B is in his office or 
not. The instrument itself receives the 
message and holds it till the person for 
whom it was intended returns and puts the 
trumpet to his ear. Then, whether it be 
days, weeks or months afterwards, the 
message is delivered to him. 

The explanation of this wonderful 
phenomenon is a flexible steel band wound 
on two spools moving quickly from one to 
the other and coming into contact with a 
small electro magnet, switched into the 
circuit, which affects the steel band in such 
a way as to record on it any sounds that 
may penetrate to the phonograph. 

It is said that up to the present the 
apparatus records a song better than a 
spoken message, but the latter is nevertheless 
quite clear, and doubtless will be improved 
on in due time. 

In Canada, so far, the only improvement 
is in telephone rates, which are being 
arbitrarily advanced, to the annoyance of 
business men. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DRIFTING ALONG WITH CHEAP GOODS. 



IT requires no effort to drift. A man can 
fall asleep in a boat and drift with the 
stream. But the best results are not 
obtained by drifting. 

A man can go into business and drift. 
But drifting does not take one ahead in 
business ; it always carries him to the 
rear. 

Quite a few people in business drift into 
the habit of allowing so-called cheap goods 
to receive by far the greater part of their 
attention. 

To sell low-priced goods requires less 
effort than to sell the better class of goods. 
But the minimum of effort usually produces 
the minimum of results. 

It takes as much effort, as a rule, to sell 
a cent's worth of goods as it does to sell a 
dollar's worth, while there is manifestly 
not, as a rule, as much profit in the former 
as in the latter. 

People are in business to make money, 
or, at least, to make a living, but, while 
cheap goods are the easiest to sell, the sell- 
ing of cheap and low-priced goods is not the 
easiest way to fulfil the end for which men 
go into business. Every man who stops to 
think realizes this, but the trouble is that so 
many merchants and their clerks have got 
into the habit of showing the lowest-priced 
goods first, and only the higher priced 
goods when the customer demands them, 
that they seem to have forgotten altogether 
about the unbusinesslike character of such 
methods. Their eyes are blind that they 
see not, and their ears are deaf that they 
hear not. 

While a good habit is harder to acquire 
than a bad one, yet the more a good habit 
is practised the easier does it become in the 
following. And the more the salesman 
pushes the higher- priced and better class 
of goods the easier will it become to sell 
them. 

We have in mind at the moment the 
experience of a traveler of a certain manu- 
facturing firm. He has for years been noted 
as a believer in the wisdom of pushing the 
better class of goods. And what he believes 
he has practised. His territory is an ordinary 
one, but he has so steadily and persistently 
striven to educate his customers along the 



lines of quality that he scarcely sells any- 
thing but the better class of goods. 

This traveler should be an example to 
salesmen behind the counter as well as to 
salesmen "on the road." 



facturers has passed without change in 
prices and the probability is that the present 
prices will rule for some time to come. 



HORSESHOES ARE LOWER. 

AT a meeting of manufacturers held 
this week, the price of horseshoes 
was materially reduced. 
The new list of prices, f.o.b. Montreal, is 
now as follows : 

Iron shoes— No 2, or larger. No. 1, or smaller. 

Light, medium heavy... $3 65 $3.90 

Snowshoes 3.90 4.15 

Steel Shoes — 

Light 3.85 4.10 

Featherweight, all sizes 510 5.10 

In addition to reducing prices, a change 
was made in the differential between 
Montreal and Toronto, it now being only 
ioc. per keg instead of 15c. per keg as 
formerly. 

The price in Toronto is 30c. per keg 
lower on iron shoes, and 40c. on steel shoes. 
In Montreal it is 25 and 35c, respectively. 

The reducton was in part, at least, due to 
the recent reduction of 50c. per keg in the 
price of horseshoes in the United States. 



THE POSITION OF WHITE LEAD. 

In a recent article on the situation of 
white lead, we foreshadowed that the Ameri- 
can pig lead market would shortly take a 
turn upwards. The rise has actually taken 
place during the last week, advancing %z. 
in two days with a slight reaction on Tues- 
day. 

During the same period the English pig 
lead market advanced 2s. 6d. per ton and 
now stands at £17 10s., the highest point. 
The white lead market in England is firm, 
whereas in the United States it is quite 
unsettled, with a feeling that the reduction 
of June 21 was premature. If the advance 
in pig lead is maintained, there is not the 
slightest doubt that the American corroders 
will advance all their products correspond- 
ingly. 

The trend of the markets as above shown 
would seem to place the American lead 
market in a position of complete isolation. 
It is therefore no basis on which to found an 
opinion as to the course of white lead in 
Canada. 

The meeting of the white lead manu- 



" BEAUTIFUL NOVA SCOTIA." 

TOURISTS from Upper Canada are 
more and more every season bending 
their steps towards the Maritime 
Provinces on summer vacations. Certainly, 
anyone who has seen the beautiful guide- 
book issued by The Yarmouth Steamship 
Company, Yarmouth, N.S., will feel strongly 
tempted to lay aside other plans and spend 
their summer's outing in the historic land 
of Evangeline. This company deserve the 
thanks of Canadians all over for the 
splendid way in which they have given to 
the public the beauties of Nova Scotia. 
Their publication is more than one would 
imagine from the term "guide-book." It 
contains 70 beautiful engravings of the 
cities, scenery, and historic villages and 
buildings, etc., in which the ocean Province 
so abounds, with a descriptive text, written 
in an entertaining manner by one of a party 
of tourists from Boston, Mass. Illustrations 
and letterpress are both up-to-date in every 
way. Hotels, railways and river steamboat 
lines may all be found in this book. This 
company also issue a complete prospectus 
of their own line of ships which cannot fail 
to interest anyone who intends to take a 
vacation this summer, as not only are the 
text, timetables, etc., complete in every 
way, but this, also, is illustrated with cuts 
of the company's ships, landing-places, 
etc. , that will decide any tourist to enjoy 
the advantages of this line. 

If all Canadian railway and steamship 
lines furnished such an attractive guide 
to the points their trains or boats reached 
there is no doubt but that a considerable 
impetus would be given to touring in Can- 
ada, both by pleasure seekers from other 
countries and by those Canadians who live 
in a less attractive part of the Dominion. 
But, whatever may be said of the beauties of 
other parts of Canada, it will be hard to 
surpass the Province whose beauties the 
Yarmouth Steamship Co. so ably describe. 

It will be worth while for anyone about to 
go on a holiday to send for " Beautiful 
Nova Scotia," the title of this guide-book, 
to the companys' headquarters at Yarmouth, 
or to any of their branch offices. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



9 



THE IRON TRADE SITUATION. 



THE tendency of the iron market is still 
downward, and the end of the journey 
has not yet been reached. 

While this tendency is world-wide, the 
centre of the disturbances which aie causing 
the weakness is still in the United States. 

During the past week there have been 
further declines in pig iron, and Bessemer 
steel has been marked down to $22. Pig 
iron is now fully $2 per ton lower than it 
was a month ago, although in most in- 
stances it is still a little higher than it was a 
year ago. 

In addition to further declines in the 
price of pig iron, the past week has 
witnessed a cut of 10 per cent, in the 
wages of the employes of several of the 
Pennsylvanian mills. 

But. though the influences at work upon 
the iron market are, in the main, decidedly 
bearish, they have not been altogether so. 

For example, while stocks of pig iron in 
the United States have increased, the total 
on furnace banks, according to The Iron 
Trade Review, is much below the average, 
" and," says that paper, " it is known that 
if consumers' yards contained the average 
amount there would be very little for 
furnaces to carry." Then, Rogers, Brown 
& Co., the well-known authorities on pig 
iron, declared a week ago that " while there 
is an accumulation of foundry irons, it 
is confined to off-grades and obscure 
brands. Standard grades, such as Nos. 1 
and 2 foundry of well-known brands, con- 
tinue very scarce, so scarce, indeed, that 
constant inconvenience is felt by con- 
sumers." 

Foundry iron, in spite of the scarcity in 
well known brands, as noted by the firm 
above quoted, continues, as we have already 
pointed out, to depreciate in price. But, 
while this is so, a continued scarcity must 
in time assert its influence on prices if it has 
not yet perceptibly done so. 

In Great Britain there is a steady deple- 
tion of stocks of pig iron, while this week's 
cables indicate that prices are steady on the 
Glasgow warrant market. 

In Canada, the feature this week is the 
reduction in the price of several lines of 
finished materials, as a result of the quart- 
erly meeting of manufacturers. Wire nails 



have been reduced 10c. per keg, cut nails 
25c, smooth steel wire 20c. per 100 lb., 
and horseshoes 25 to 40c. per keg. 

These declines in Canada were in some 
instances expected, for, while prices in this 
country were not advanced to the same 
extent as they were in the United States, 
yet it was well-known that buyers were 
holding off for lower prices. Consequently, 
it was necessary to make some reductions in 
order to try and stimulate business a little. 

We do not, however, look for any great 
stimulus in business. There is nothing in 
the situation to warrant buying in anticipa- 
tion of wants. Naturally, under such con- 
ditions, merchants, wholesale and letail, will 
purchase only for immediate requirements. 
And under the circumstances it is certainly 
the most businesslike thing to do. But a 
demand for immediate requirements is likely 
to mean a steady trade, with the volume, 
in the aggregate, of fair proportions. 

What is wanted is a belief that prices 
have reached a basis where they will rule 
steady. Then people will buy to keep their 
stocks properly assorted, and not hold off 
with the persistency which they are 
evidently doing. 

In most of the staple lines of finished 
materials, prices have for the present, evi- 
dently, reached a steadier basis and for that 
reason we look for a little steadier, if not 
for much heavier buying. 



AN IRON PIPE "CINCH." 

A good story is going the rounds of the 
hardware and plumbing supply trades in 
Canada in regard to iron pipe of United 
States manufacture. 

As everyone in the trade knows, a short 
time ago iron pipe manufacturers in the 
United States made the manufacturers in 
Canada quite uncomfortable for a while 
because of the activity which they displayed 
in trying to get business in this market. 

As the prices were extremely low, several 
wholesale firms in Canada bought good 
round lots. Some of these lots were allowed 
to remain in bond. 

By-and bye it was found that the pipe 
could be sold in the United States at a good 
profit. This knowjedge led at least some 
of the holders to ship the pipe back to the 



United States at a profit of about $ 70 ner 
car. One Toronto firm is reported to have 
shipped four cars in this way and cleared 
$2,800, and one or two other firms are saul 
to have made even more, having shipped 
larger quantities. 

The United States manufacturers had no 
more low-priced pipe for Canada when they 
discovered how they were being undersold 
in their own market by pipe of their own 
make. 

GREAT INCREASE IN FIRE LOSS. 

ALTHOUGH one may be prepared by 
the events of the last month or so 
for the statement that the fire loss 
in Canada and the United States during the 
first six months of 1900 exceeds that of 
either 1898 or 1899, the greatness of the 
loss increase, as shown by figures, is rather 
startling. The losses by fire for the first 
half of 1900 were $103,298,000, compared 
with $65,690,750 for 1899. This is an 
increase of $27,608,150 over last year. 

The greatest loss was in the Ottawa fire, 
and the next the late Hoboken disaster to 
docks and ships. It should be a matter of 
thankfulness for Canadians to realize that, 
although the Ottawa fire in point of loss was 
more than twice that of Hoboken, being 
$12,000,000 against $5,350,000, yet the 
loss of life was small. Hundreds of people 
were lost in the Hoboken fire, while only 
two or three lives were lost in the Canadian 
conflagration. 

It is worthy of note that in fires of 
$500,000 or over in the United States or 
Canada, during the past six months, out of 
a total of about $28,000,000, Canada's 
share in the loss is $12,700,000, or nearly 
half, a rather large proportion under the 
circumstances, as this was contributed by 
two fires, Ottawa, and Sandon, B.C. 



PERSISTENCY DOES IT. 

Fish are not caught every time the hook 
is baited. Neither are customers secured 
every time an advertisement is published. 
But, just as persistent baiting of the 
hook results in many fish being caught, so 
persistent and judicious advertising secures 
many customers. It is a law as true as any 
of Nature's laws. 



Judicious advertising gives financial 
strength to the business and gathers dollars 
for the latter days of the merchant. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE WITH TRINIDAD. 

IN an interview with Mr. George Mitchell, 
M.P.P., a Nova Scotian exporter and 
importer, The Halifax Chronicle quotes 
him as speaking very favorably of the pro- 
posed reciprocity treaty between Canada 
and Trinidad. Mr. Mitchell already does 
a good trade in fish and other Nova Scotian 
products with Trinidad ; and imports from 
there sugar, molasses, and other products of 
the Island. He finds the Trinidad people 
good customers. They are well supplied 
with money and are in a prosperous condi- 
tion, more so than any other island of the 
West Indies. Indeed, during the last 20 
years, which have been very depressing to 
the West Indies in regard to cane-growing, 
all the other colonies were falling away in 
both trade and population, except Trinidad, 
whose variety of resources enabled her to 
stem the tide. 

Canada at present holds fourth place in 
the Trinidad trade, Great Britain, Venezuela 
and the United States being the only ones 
above us on the list. The exports of the 
Island include sugar, molasses, rum, cocoa, 
coffee, asphalt, hides, bitters, and liquors. 
Mr. Mitchell thought that, under the pro- 
posed treaty, our trade would expand from 
the west in particular. Breadstuff's and 
farm products would be the principal lines 
in which we could increase trade. 

The cities of Halifax and St. John would 
greatly benefit from the treaty, as it contains 
a clause that business must be done direct 
from Canadian ports. With the improved 
steamship service, there should be a great 
expansion in trade with not only Trinidad, 
but all the West Indian Islands. The 
greatest difficulty, Mr. Mitchell thought, 
would be the trouble in using all their staple 
product, sugar, of which, we consume about 
two-thirds ; but, if the Home Government 
wish to carry out this scheme, there should 
be no difficulty in arranging about the other 
third. There might be, too, a great develop- 
ment in the consumption of many articles 
that are now used very sparingly in Canada. 

On the whole, Mr. Mitchell thought that 
reciprocity with Trinidad would mean a 
great development of trade. " I believe 
the market a good one," he said, "the 
financial condition of the colony is excellent. 
The export trade of the United States with 
Trinidad to-day is seven times greater than 
that of Canada, and under the proposed 
treaty this might well be reversed. I hope 
the proposed treaty may be consummated." 



A NOVEL PETITION. 

The Gait Reporter contains the follow- 
ing : "The young women who work in 
Newlands & Co's. factory are a far-seeing 
and original set. Last night they presented 
a petition to the firm, regarding a modera- 



tion in the amount of overtime, signed by 
everyone of the employes. Lest the firm 
should find out by the first name who put 
the petition into circulation, the paper was 
circular in shape and the names were signed 
in the rings, making it impossible to tell 
whose name was first." 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Capt. E. S. M. Lovelace, B.A.Sc, of the 
Temple Building, Montreal, is going to close 
his office for three or four months and take 
a needed yet profitable holiday. He has 
accepted the responsibility of engineering 
the construction of the G.T.R. double track 
system from Hamilton to Niagara Falls. 
This is a vocation he once engaged in before 
.he settled down in an office at his present 
duties, and he returns to it with feelings of 
anticipated pleasure. 

Mf.'W. R. Dawson, the assistant general 
sales agwit of the Standard Chain Co., is 
expected to "arrive in Montreal this week for 
the' purpose of studying the chain business 
of Canada, and assisting the local agents in 
introducing their trace chain* , cow ties, etc. 



THE SUPPLY OF WIRE GOODS. 

The Wire Goods Company have recently 
acquired and taken over the entire business 
of The American Wire Goods Company, of 
Lowell, Mass. The Lowell concern have 
been competitors, to some extent, of the 
Worcester concern, and this abolition by 
the latter company of all the property of 
every nature will tend to give them even 
greater prominence than they now hold in 
the wire hardware market. 

There has been some difficulty and 
delay in obtaining the popular numbers of 
wire coat and hat hooks that have always 
been made by the Lowell concern, but we 
are assured that The Wire Goods Company 
will hereafter hold themselves in readiness 
to supply these goods in any quantity 
desired. 



THE HAY CROP IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

The farmers in the Annapolis Valley are 
busy haying, and the president of the Mari- 
time Board of Trade informs Hardware 
and Metal that the crop will be a good 
one. 



FOR A GOLD BASIS. 

Miss Wellon stood in front of the mirror, 
looking at the reflection of her once golden 
hair, now thickly streaked with silver. 

"I am tired of the double standard," 
she said. 

And she proceeded to make arrange- 
ments to place it on an'exclusive gold basis. 
— Chicago Tribune. 



AN UNSUITABLE ALLEGORY. 

A company in the United States making 
a line of agricultural machinery was 
anxious to extend its export trade in reapers 
and mowers, and was advised that a market 
existed in Germany. It was an enterprising 
and liberal advertiser, and its first idea 
was to flood Germany with advertising pic- 
tures which would be hung up in stores and ^- 
shop-windows, and which could not fail to 
attract attention. The design, which was 
executed in the highest style of color litho- 
graphy, represented a mowing machine 
driven by the Goddess of Liberty in shining 
and polychromatic garments of scanty pro- 
portions, and drawn by a team of Bengal 
tigers. It was a brilliant placard. Any 
American country storekeeper would gladly 
have hung it up for its decorative value, 
and the average American farmer would 
have been greatly impressed by it, and 
would probably have understood its symbol- 
ism without any explanation. The net 
result of the effort to circulate it in Ger- 
many, however, was a letter from the com- 
pany's agent in that country, from which 
the following extract is made : 

" The picture of your admirable machine, 
of which I the receipt of 10,000 acknow- 
ledge, is not useful in this country, and it is 
of much regret to me that I request to 
return them permission. The women of 
our country, when by circumstances to do 
agricultural work compelled, do not dress 
as your picture shows is the custom in your 
wonderful country, and would not even 
deem such garments with modesty to con- 
sist. Also we do not tigers for draught 
purposes cultivate, they not being to the 
country native, nor in our experience for 
such work well suited. I have to my 
customers explained with earnestness that 
your picture is a " sinnbild " (allegory), 
and does not mean that your admirable 
machine should be operated by women too 
little clothed, nor is it necessary that the 
place of horses shall be animals from the 
Zoologischer Garten be taken. I cannot 
use them as you instruct, and your further 
advices respectfully await." 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE 



1 



Prompt Shipmen 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



}] 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES 

A MEETING of the creditors of J. L 
Johnson & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, Edmonton, N.W.T., is 
called for July 31. 

H. Boulay, general merchant, Sayabec, 
Que., has assigned. 

Hiram Hyde, coal dealer, Truro, N.S., 
has assigned to W. F. Lawrence. 

Stevenson & Johnson, tinware, etc., 
Sarnia, Ont. , have assigned to C. B. Arm- 
strong. 

A curator of A. S. Lame, general mer- 
chant, St. Joseph, Que., will be appointed 
on July 17. 

D, Arcand has been appointed curator of 
Jacques Verret, general merchant, Charles- 
bourg. Que. 

H. Robichand, general merchant, L'Anse 
a Gascon, Que., offers to compromise at 40c. 
on the dollar. 

Jas. Peltier, general merchant, St. Samuel 
deGayhurst, Que., has voluntarialy assigned 
to V. E. Paradis. 

George E. Banks, general merchant, 
Caledonia Corner, N.S., is asking for an 
extension of time. 

There will be a meeting of the creditors of 
the estate of G. K. Frazer & Co., general 
merchants, Spring Hill. N.S. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Mitte & Fils, sawmillers, Portneuf, Que., 
have dissolved. 

Dorval & Boisvert, machinists, Quebec, 
have registered partnership. 

George Wait & Co. have registered part- 
nership as produce and commission 
merchants, Montreal. 

Fraser Bros., harness dealers, New 
Glasgow, N.S., have dissolved, and Chris- 
tine Fraser and Thomas Fraser have formed 
a new partnership under the old style. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

Alphonse Dupuis, general merchant, 
Comber, Ont., has sold out to G. B. Wray. 

Williamson Bros., general merchants, 
Berlin, Ont., have sold out to B. Grennan. 

Henser & Co., Thornbury, Ont., are 
advertising their planing mill business for 
sale. 

John Hartwick, blacksmith, Rainham 
Centre, Ont., advertises his business for 
sale. 

The assets of Cyr & Guite, New Carlisle, 
Que., general merchants, will be sold 
July 18. 

Caskey & Van Norman, general mer- 
chants, McDonald, Man., have sold out to 
Broadfoot Bros. 

The buildings, stock and machinery of 
the Lockeport Iron Works, Lockeport, N.S., 
are offered for sale by auction, July 24. 

The stock of the estate of T. B. Willis, 




Pi£M^P\Pi£^ A AAAAA 



«B-i3" 

is the number of a booklet that we want you to 
have if you're interested in the sale of paint. 

The title of the booklet is " The Sherwin-Williams Paints : 
What they are and how they're sold." 

"B-13 " is illustrated with the packages of our goods and 
the advertising features for each line. The goods and the 
methods of selling them are briefly and pointedly described. 

It will pay you to send for it. Nothing short of a personal 
interview or a trip through our factories could give you as much 
clear information about 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 

Send for "B 13." A postal card to No. 21 St. Antoine 
street, Montreal, will do. 



Canadian Division ; 

Montreal. 
21 St. Antoine St., 



the Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 




CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO. 
NEW YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




general merchant, Markham, Ont., is 
advertised for sale on July 13 by the sheriff. 

CHANGES. 

Wm. Sharp, planing-miller, Minnedosa, 
Man., is out of business. 

C. Percy Turnbull, bicycles, Digby, 
N.S., has opened up business. 

Mathers & Kelly, general merchants, 
Ymir, B.C., are out of business. 

A. J. Bell, harness dealer, Chilliwack, 
B.C., advertise giving up business. 

Harry Andrews, painter, Caledonia Cor- 
ner, N.S., has commenced business. 

James E. Birch, general merchant, Elms- 
dale, P. EI., is commencing business. 

The Atikokan Iron Co., Limited, Fort 
William, Ont., have obtained a charter. 

J. F. McDonald has begun business as 
general merchant at Sydney Mines, N.S. 

Hindley & Co., machinists, Glenboro, 
Man., have been succeeded by B. Heas- 
man. 

Stapley & Brewster, machinists, Edmon- 
ton, N.W.T. , have been succeeded by W. 
A. Brewster. 

Hugh Steele & Son, blacksmiths, Minne- 
dosa, Man., have been succeeded by 
Benjamin Steele. 

James Hillis & Sons, stores and foundry, 
Halifax, N.S., are about opening a branch 
at Sydney, N.S. 

Emma Paris has registered proprietress 



of A'f. Trottier & Cie., sawmillers, Riviere 
Bois Clair, Que. 

Louis Duperre has registered as pro- 
prietor of T. L. Girard & Cie., general 
merchants, Shawenegan Falls, Que. 

Jos. A. Arial and Ed. Lachance have 
registered as proprietors of Arial & 
Lachance, tinsmiths, St. Casimer, Que. 

Ed. Flynn, Charles Lamb, Charles 
Laterreur and Nap. Laterreur, general 
merchants, and F. & J. W. Pidgeon, 
fruiterers, etc., all of Perce, Que., are out 
of business. 

FIRES. 

L. Gosselin, blacksmith, St. Isidore 
(Dorchester), Que., was burned out. 

C. Woods, bicycles, etc., St. John's, 
Newfoundland, was burned out ; insured. 

A. & W. Moody, general merchants, 
Terrebonne, Que., have been burned out. 

Samuel Coppleman's general store, 
Wawanesa, was slightly damaged by lire. 

Moses Butt, blacksmith, St. John's, 
Newfoundland, has been burned out; insured. 

J. B. Turgeon, general merchant, St. 
Isidore, Que., has been burned out ; in- 
sured. 

The Cossitt Bros. Co., Limited, manu- 
facturers of agricultural implements, Brock- 
ville, Ont., were burned out ; partially 
insured. 

DEATHS. 

A. McNaughton, general merchant and 
hotel, Quesnelle, B.C., is dead. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE PRICE OF PIG LEAD. 

REFERRING to the situation in pig 
lead, The Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter 
has the following in its issue of 
July 2 : 

'* The price of pig lead having ruled 
steady for a long time, and it being an- 
nounced that the demand was sufficient to 
prevent any undue accumulation, the con- 
sumers were induced to make liberal 
purchases, the impression being fostered 
that there was a probability of an advance. 
This was the state of affairs early in May, 
when suddenly The American Smelting 
Company announced a reduction in price, 
to be speedily followed by further reduc- 
tions, until the selling price for common was 
3^c. per lb. The explanation given was 
that there had been considerable accumula- 
tion of stocks, and, the demand being light, 
it was hoped by this means to stimulate the 
inquiry and bring about a reduction in 
stocks. Whether the smelting company 
succeeded in this is not definitely known, 
but the export demand was increased and 
the shipments abroad have been larger. It 
is believed, however, that the demand for 
home consumption was not materially 
affected, as consumers already had large 
supplies, which they had contracted for 
under the belief that if a change would 
occur it would be to higher figures. The 
manufacturers of lead products did not at 
once reduce the selling price of their pro- 
ducts, but, finding the apparent tendency 
downward, they finally revised their quota- 
tions to more nearly conform to the new 
prices for the raw material, and began to 
enter the market for supplies to meet later 
requirements. They were soon confronted 
with a refusal to make a price on future 
deliveries, and this week the announce- 
ment came of an advance of X c> P er lb., 
to be followed the next day by a further 
similar advance. The explanation given 
for this action was that stocks had been 
greatly reduced and that consumptive re- 
quirements are now in excess of production. 
It is, perhaps, needless to say that a num- 
ber of large consumers were unpre- 
pared in the first instance for the decline, 
and in the second for the advance, and con- 
sequently they do not entertain a very high 
regard for the arbitrary and, as they deem 
it, erratic action of The American Smelting 
Company. Other products were also 
affected by the reduction in the price of pig 
lead, and zinc white followed in the wake 
of white lead. Now that the price of pig 
lead has again advanced, the prices of these 
products will, of necessity, be made to con- 
form, although up to the present time 
corroders have announced no advance on 
their products. 

" The action of The American Smelting 
Company has been severely criticized, both 



in suddenly reducing the price of pig lead 
after the larger consumers had been induced 
to make large purchases, and in advancing 
the price again so soon before they had an 
opportunity to work off the high cost lead 
and replenish at the lower figures. The 
statement made early in May of undue 
accumulation has been discredited, and it 
is claimed that if the former statement was 



strictly in accordance with the facts, the 
later one, after the lapse of only six weeks, 
that the stocks had been reduced and that 
consumptive requirements are in excels of 
production, cannot be reconciled. It Vs the 
belief of many that the object in reducing 
the price last month has been withheld, and 
that if accomplished it was not the material 
reduction in stocks." 



Major Taylor 

CHAMPION OF THE WORLD 

Rides an Iyer Johnson Bicycle. 

►VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVIVVVVVVV*VVWWWWVVVVV»*****1 

On June 30th at Manhattan Beach Track he defeated 
Frank Kramer in a special match race of one mile, winning 
two straight heats. 

Watch Him Win. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



Branches New York 
Boston 
Worcester 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 




WW»/W* 



PAINT BRUSHES 

THAT ARE WELL FINISHED AND MAKE ATTRACTIVE SHELF GOODS 

ARE 

REQUIRED 

BY EVERY PROGRESSIVE HARDWARE STORE 

"CANADA 



THEY ARE MADE FROM CAREFULLY SELECTED MATERIALS, AND 
FULLY GUARANTEED BY THE MANUFACTURERS. PUT UP IN STRONG 
CARDBOARD BOXES AND NEATLY LABELLED. 



BOECKH BROS. & COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS, TORONTO, ONT. 

Montreal Branch : 

1 and 3 DeBresoles St. 

! ^V»VVVW*»VlVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVIM^^^^iVVV» 



Offices, Sample and Warerooim : 

80 York St. and 12 Clarence St. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE. 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



Harvest Tools 




Hay Forks 
Straw Forks 
Barley Forks 
Manure Forks 
Potato Forks 
Potato Drags 
Vegetable Scoops 



Garden Hoes 
Field Hoes 
Scythes 
Snaths 
Cradles 
Scythe Stones 
Emery Stones 



Hoe Handles 
Fork Handles 
Rake Handles 
Barley Fork " 
Cradle Fingers 
Ferrules 
Harvest Whips 



Hay Rakes, Reaping Hooks, Corn Knives and Harvest Mitts, 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



A PULL LINE. 



Graham Wire and Cut Nails are the Best, 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 13, 1900. 
HARDWARE. 

THE volume of trade this week has 
been unexpectedly increased. The 
orders are not large, but they are 
well maintained, keeping trade much more 
active than was expected. It cannot be said 
that the run has been on any particular line, 
nor have many future orders been made. 
The demand has covered all the general 
stock. Barbed wire, fence wire, nails and 
sporting goods are moving out in fair 
quantities. In regard to prices the feature 
of the week has been the meeting of the 
manufacturers in Toronto, and the reduction 
of prices in certain lines of goods, in sym- 
pathy with the easy markets in raw ma- 
terials. Horseshoes have been reduced 25c. 
for iron and 35c. for steel. Dealers in 
spikes will now give 25 per cent, off instead 
of 20 as heretofore. While we write the 
manufacturers are still in convention, but 
not many further developments are antici- 
pated. Cut nails may take a drop, but 
wire nails will likely maintain their old 



rates. Of course this is the usual fall settling 
of prices for the next six months. The 
patching up of prices of iron pipe noticed 
last week failed to hold more than three 
days on account of disagreement among the 
manufacturers. Prices are now determined 
by individual bargains, but they are cer- 
tainly much lower now than a week ago. 

Barbed Wire — A brisk trade has been 
done this week. Price is unchanged with 
the base at $3 30. 

Galvanized Wire — Prices and demand 
are steady. We quote : Nos. 6, 7, and 8 
guage, $3.95; No. 9, #3.20; No. 10, $4. 10 ; 
No. 11, $4-15'. No. 12, $3.35; No. 13, $3.45; 
No. 14, $4-5° ; No. 15, 85 ; and No. 16, 
$5.25. 

Smooth Wire —Stocking orders have 
been numerous this week. Prices are un- 
changed. We quote $3.20 per 100 lb. base. 

Fine Steel Wire — The discount is 
12^ per cent, off list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — Featureless. 
Discounts are 55 and 2^ per cent, on 
brass, and 50 and 2 5^ per cent, on copper. 



Fence Staples —Unchanged at $3 60 for 
bright. 

Wire Nails — Stocks are being kept up 
to the mark only. Some look for a decline 
of prices, but they are likely to look in 
vain. Prices remain at $3.20 for small, and 
83.10 for carlots. 

Cut Nails — There has been little busi- 
ness done as a decline is anticipated. We 
quote at 82.85 for small, and 82.75 for 
carlots. 

Horse Nails — The convention has 
failed to alter the situation in regard to 
horsenails. The discount is 50 per cent, on 
Standard and 50 and 10 per cent, on 
Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Horseshoes are quoted 
25c. lower for iron and 35c. lower 
for steel varieties. We quote as fol- 
lows: Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, 8365 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, 83-9° ; snow shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, 8390; No. 1 and smaller, 84.15; 
X L steel shoes all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, 83-85 ; No. 1 and smaller, 84 IO I 
feather-weight, all sizes, 8510; toe weight 



ALL YOU WANT . . . 



For your tinshop 
and housefurnishing de- 
partments can be sup- 
plied by us from any 
of our warehouses. 

You can save FREIGHT 
by purchasing every- 
thing from us. 

OUR PRICES 



mrwwwrwnwm* 



ARE RIGHT 



Prompt Shipment. 







Entire Floor Area 

2Z&652jQ.FT.OR 

OVER 8% ACRES . 

Employing 
over 550 hands 
THE YEAR ROUND. 



£UJ?N£S£ 



LONDON 



S M 

TORONTO 



M 



O 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



American Sheet Steel Company 
Battery Park Building 

""*.\"ew Yoik 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Planished lion 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

B. A S. II. Thompson & Company 

■I St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO, 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 
^fjl/ll.0 <0-PAY <H£rt, 

•DO YOl/? 

6$dve ruse meet t 
«*• in the «f* 

1\ecoro, 

To^orJ-ro 

- wttl bring you, 

tendersfrem. t/r» 
mi'';;, k- -, fast contractors. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 




Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



steel shoes, all sizes, 56.20 f.o.b. Mont 
real; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and Guelph, 
loc. extra. 

Screws — There is nothing particular to 
note this week. Discounts are as fol- 
lows : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off list ; 
round head bright, 75 per cent. ; flat head 
brass, 75 per cent.; round head brass, 67 '4 
per cent.; flat head bronze, 67 }4 per cent.; 
round head bronze, 62 J^ per cent. 

Bolts — The feeling in bolts is decidedly 
easy and some presage a decline. Discounts 
are: Tire bolts, 60 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 50 per cent. ; ditto, full square, 
65 per cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 52 J^ 
percent.; coach screws, 65 percent.; sleigh- 
shoe bolts, 70 per cent.; blank bolts, 52^ 
per cent. ; bolt ends, 52 y 2 per cent. ; nuts, 
square, 3J£c. per lb. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4c. off; stove bolts, 60 and 10; plough bolts. 
50 per cent. 

Rivets — The tone of the rivet market is 
easy, and we quote discounts higher than 
last week. Discounts are as follows : 
Best iron rivets, section, catriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
50 per cent, off; swedes iron burrs, 45 per 
cent, off; copper rivets, 35 per cent. ; 
coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. 
carton boxes, 50 per cent. off. 

Cordage — Hayfork rope is being asked 
for this week, as well as binder twine, to 
some extent. We quote : Manila, 14 to 
I4^c, and sisal, 10^ to 11c. base. 

Spades and Shovels — Discounts are 40 
and 5 per cent. 

Firebricks — We quote $17 to $24 per 
1,000, as to brand. 

Cement — Cement has been in good 
demand this week, with the prices un- 
changed. We quote : German, $2.40 to 
$2.60 ; English, $2.30 to $2.40 ; Belgian, 
$1 80 to $2.10. 

MKTALS 

The trade in metals has not been so active 
for some weeks as it was the last few dajs. 
The general tone in regard to prices is firm 
and several transactions at outside prices are 
reported. English quotations in tin are firm 
and ingot copper is also reported at an 
advance. Lead shares the same tendency. 
Iron pipe is quoted on the old basis on 
account of the failure of manufacturers to 
hold together. 

Pig Iron — Most dealers consider that 
pig iron has reached its lowest point, as 
smelters in the United States are now turn- 
ing out the product at a loss. It would not 
surprise knowing ones if the tone chould 
become stiff. Some transactions in Summer- 
lee have occured at $25 on the wharf. In 
large transactions there may be a shading 
of that price. 

Bar Iron — We quote 52.25 to $2.30 per 



TINPLATES 

"LYDBROOK," "TRYM," 
" GRAFTON," "ALLAWAYS," 
"CANADA CROWN," ETC. 

CANADA PLATES 

" DOMINION CROWN " All Polished. 
"ALLAWAYS" best Half Bright. 
"PONTYPOOL" Half Bright. 
"DOMINION CROWN " Galvanized 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 



MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

SO JOHN STREET N. 

-^^^^ Hamilton, Ont. 

Offer from Store, 
Montreal, Toronto and Hamilton: 

PIGr TIN, "Straits" 
ING-OT COPPER 
PIG- LEAD 
ZINC SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Maple Leaf" Brand 

Elastilite Varnish 

For Inside. For Outside. 

"Maple Leaf" Brand 

Liquid Coach Enamels 



IO Shades. 



"Maple Leaf" Brand 

Varnish Stain 



6 Shades. 



Like our Maple Leaf Boys in the Imperial Army, 
beat all comers in the fight for supremacy. 



— Manufactured only by- 



] h Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



WE HAVE A LARGE AND FULLY ASSORTED 
STOCK OF 






Harvest tools 



Forks, 
Rakes, 
Hoes, 
Scythes, 



Snaths, 
Spades, 
Shovels, 
Etc., 



and will guarantee prompt shipment from 
warehouse for immediate orders. 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



ioo lb. f.o.b. Montreal. There is an easy 
feeling prevailing. 

Black Sheets — English makers are 
quoting reductions, and the price here is 
unsettled. Some transactions lead us to 
quote the base on 8 to 20 gauge at $2.95. 

Galvanized Iron — In this line English 
makers have reduced their prices about 50c. 
per ton. This has had a bad effect on the 
activity of the market. We quote as 
follows : No. 28 Queen's Head, #4.75 
to $5.00, and Comet, No. 28, $4.45 to 
$4.70. 

Ingot Copper — Quotations received here 
on the raw material would indicate that the 
foreign market for ingot copper is advanc- 
ing. We still quote it at \7}ic. 

Ingot Tin — Foreign markets are a little 
higher. Prices here are advanced %c., 
now being 35#c. 

Lead — All English and American leads 
have advanced, and in the city it is now 
quoted at 54- 50. base. 

Lead Pipe — No change. We quote : 7c. 
for ordinary and 7 'Ac for composition 
waste, with 1 5 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — Business in this line is fairly 
active. We quote : %, $2.95 per 100 ft.; 
H- 52.95; '/i. #3-io; X, $3.45; I. $4-95". 
i}4< $6.75; i#, $8.10, and 2-in., $10.80. 
These are the closest figures. 



Tinplates — Business quiet at $4.50 for 
coke and $4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — The market rules easy. 
We quote : 52's, $3.10 ; 60' s, $3. 15 ; 75's, 
$3.20; full polished, $3- 40, and galvanized, 

54-75- 

Terne Plate — Trade is dull, with the 
price unchanged at $8.50. 

Swedish Iron — We quote $4.25. 

Coil Chain — Future orders keep coming 
in, but the market tone is easy. There are 
some cuts below our quotations. We quote : 
No. 6, 12 j£c. No. 5, lie; No. 4, io^c; 
No. 3, 10c; X-mrfi, 8j£c; 5-16,55.50; 

rt> #5-35; 7 " l6> #5-°°; l A> ?4-75 ; 9-16, 

$4.70; #,$4-35: M< 24-25 ; H- $4-2o, 
and 1 inch, $4.10. 

Sheet Zinc — The market is decidedly 
dull at 6yi to 6^c. 

Antimony — Continues the same, at 
ioj^c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

This trade is now entering upon the 
summer quiet. There are no changes of 
this week to report. Linseed oil continues 
to advance in England but on account of 
previous arrivals prices here are steady. 
English and American markets for lead are 
both firmer than they were a week ago, but 
no change is expected here. Turpentine is 
high in the South and firm here. We quote: 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 



standard, $6.75 ; No. 1, $6.37^ ; No. 2, 
$6; No. 3, $$.62.%, and No. 4, $5.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal, prompt cash. 

Dry White Lead — $5.75 incasks; kegs, 
$6. 

Red Lead — Firm; casks, 55.10; in 
kegs, $5.35 to $5.50. 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6^c.;in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7%c. 

Putty -We quote : Bulk, $1.95 ; blad- 
ders, in bbls., 52.10; bladders, in cases, 
52.25; in tins, 52.35 to 52.60. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 84c. ; boiled, 
89c, five to nine-barrels, ic. less, ten 
and twenty-barrel lots open, net cash, plus 
2C. for 4 months. Delivered anywhere in 
Ontario between Montreal and Oshawa at 
2c. per gallon advance and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 68c. ; two to 
four barrels, 69c; five barrels and over, 
open terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — Firm; $1.20 to 5 1.40 per 
gallon. 

CastorOil — Firm; %}{ to 9 %c. in whole- 
sale lots, and '/ic. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47^ to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c. 

Paris Green — Demand fair at firm prices; 
lib. packets, i9j£c, and drums, i8#c. 

Naval Stores — A more active busi- 
ness has been done in naval stores, and 
prices generally rule steady. . Resins, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



52.75 to $4-5°. as t0 brand; coal tar, 
$3.25 to $3.75 ; cotton waste, 4# to $H C - 
for colored, and 6 to 7#c. for white 
oaiuLi, 5# to 6%c, and cotton oakum, 
10 to lie. 

GLASS. 

Only a sorting trade is being done in 
glass. There is a firm tendency abroad. 
We quote as follows : First break, J 2 ; 
second, 52.10 for 50 feet ; first break, 100 
feet, $3.80; second, 54 ; third, $45° ; 
fourth, 54.75 ! fifth. $5- 2 5 '• sixth, 55-75. 
and seventh, 56.25. 

PETROLEUM. 

The summer trade is quiet except in 
machine oils. We quote: "Silver Star," 
jobbers, i6^c. ; retail, I7j£ c - '. " Imperial 
Acme," 17*4 and i8^c; " S. C. Acme," 
19 and 20c; "Astral," 20 and 21c. 
HIDES. 

As last quoted : Beef hides, 8c. for No. 
1 ; 7c. for No. 1, and 6c. for No. 3. Calf- 
skins, 9c. for No. 1, and 7c. for No. 2. 

MONTREAL NOTES. 

The Standard Chain Co. have recently 
made new export prices for Canada, which 
are considerably lower than they were a 
week ago. 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 13, 1900. 

HARDWARE. 

THE feature of the wholesale hardware 
trade during the past week is the 
quarterly meetings of the different 
manufacturers, and the reduction in prices 
in certain lines as a result thereof. Wire 
nails have been reduced 10c, cut nails 25c , 
horseshoes 25 to 40c, and smooth steel 
wire 20c. Other changes are pressed 
spikes, Mrs. Potts sad irons, and rope. The 
volume of business is steady and much 
about the same as it was a week ago. 
Payments are fair, and quite a number of 
letter orders are being received. There is 
very little business being done in fence wire 
of any kind, and, in nails, business is only 
moderate. A nice steady trade is still be- 
ing done in screws, bolts, and rivets and 
burrs. Harvest tools are going out fairly 
well. A good demand is being experienced 
for enameled ware, but tinware is still quiet. 
A fair sorting- up trade is being done in 
cutlery and sporting goods. 

Barbed Wire — There is very little being 
done and prices are without change. We 
quote f.o.b. Cleveland 52-95 in carlots, and 
53.05 in less than carlots ; f.o.b. Toronto, 
53.25 in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — Trade is particu- 
larly quiet in galvanized wire. We quote 
as follows from Toronto : No. 5, 54.52^; 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, 53.85 ; No. 
9, 53-lo; No. 10, 54; No. 11, 54.05; No. 



The Popular Fireproof 
Roofing 

Eastlake 
Shingles 

GALVANIZED OR PAINTED 




Always give absolute satisfaction. 

Not only fire and weatherproof, but also lightning and rust proof. 

And quicker laid than others — their patent side lock gives them immense superiority. 

They are in great demand by practical builders everywhere — are you handling them ? 

Our catalogues and price list are at your service. 



METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 



KING and 

DUFFERIN 

STREETS, 



Toronto. 






12, 53-25; No - *3. #3-35 : No - '4. #4-4o ; 
No. 15. 55.10; No. 16, 55.15. The f o.b. 
price Cleveland for No. 69 base is 52.80 in 
less than carloads, and $2.70 for carloads. 
Terms are 60 days or 2 per cent. 10 days. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is not 
much being done in oiled and annealed 
wire. The base price has been reduced 20c. , 
now being 53 per 100 lb. The recent 
figure of 53- IO quoted by us was a mistake, 
the price up till the present change being 
53 20 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The price of wire nails 
has been reduced 10c. per 100 lb., the base 
now being 53 in carlots and 53- 10 in less 
than carlots. The demand is light, but a 
better business is looked for with the reduc- 
tion in prices. \ 

Cut Nails — These have also been re- 
duced, the price now being 25c. lower, at 
52.60 per keg Toronto, Hamilton, London 
and Belleville. The demand is decidedly 
light. 

Horseshoes — Quite a reduction has been 
made in the price of horseshoes, quotations 
being 30c. lower on iron shoes, and 40c. on 
steel shoes. We quote as follows, f.o.b. 
Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
light, medium and heavy, 53-75 ; snow 
shoes, 54 ; light steel shoes, S3 95 ; 
featherweight (all sizes), 55-20 ; iron 
shoes, No. i and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), 54; snow- 
shoe, 54.25 ; light steel shoes, 54 20 ; 
featherweight, (all sizes), 55- 20. The 
differential between Toronto and Montreal 
is now only 10c. instead of 15c. as 
formerly. 

Horse Nails — No change has been 
made in the price of these. The volume 
of business is still light. Discount 50 per 



cent, on standard oval head, and 50 and 10 
per cent, on Acadia. 

Pressed Spikes. — A reduction has been 
made in the price of these, the discount 
now being 25 per cent., instead of 20 per 
cent, as formerly. 

Screws — Trade keeps fairly good in this 
line and prices are without change. We 
quote : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off 
the list ; round head bright, 75 per cent.; 
flat head brass, 75 per cent. : round head 
brass, 67% per cent.; flat head bronze, 
67 >£ per cent.; round head bronze, 62^ 
per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Trade is keeping up 
well, a fairly good demand being reported 
for stove and tire bolts. We quote as 
follows : Norway bolts, full, square, 65 
per cent. ; common carriage bolts, all 
sizes, 50 per cent. ; ditto, full square, 65 per 
cent. ; machine bolts, all sizes, 52^ 
per cent. ; coach screws, 65 per cent. ; 
sleighshoe bolts, 70 per cent. ; blank bolts, 
52^ percent.; bolt ends, 62^ per cent.; 
nuts, square, 2> l A c - °^ < nuts, hexagon, 4c. 
off; tapping nuts, 60 per cent.; tire bolts, 
60 per cent.; stove bolts, 60 and 10 per 
cent. ; plough bolts, 50 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — Business keeps 
fairly good in rivets and burrs and prices 
are quoted as before. We quote : Car- 
riage section, wagon box, rivets, etc. 50 per 
cent. ; black M rivets, 50 per cent. ; iron 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper rivets, 35 per 
cent. ; bifurcated, with box, 5-lb. carton 
boxes, 30c. per lb. 

Enameled Ware — Business is increas- 
ing, especially in preserving kettles, and a 
nice trade has been done during the past 
week. 

Rope— There has been quite a sharp re- 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



duction in the price of both sisal and manila 
rope, and we now quote the base price as 
follows: Pure manila, 13^4 to 14c. ; mer- 
chants' manila, 12^ to 13c. ; "A" quality 
manila, iij£ to 12c; special manila, 10^ 
to 11c; sisal, 9% to 10c. The demand for 
rope is only moderate. 

Spades and Shovels — Trade is fair for 
this time of the year. Discount 40 and 5 
per cent. 

Harvest Tools— A fair trade is being 
done, but the volume of business is not up 
to what it was at this time last year. The 
disappointment appears to be particularly 
in regard to haying tools and snaths. 

Poultry Netting — Although the season 
for a large demand is about over, there is 
still a fair sorting-up business being done. 
Discount, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Ice Cream Freezers— Trade is falling 
off in this line, although there are still quite 
a few going out. 

Refrigerators — Quite a little revival in 
business has been experienced during the 
past week, much to the gratification of the 
wholesale trade, who had still a few left 
over. 

Gas and Oil Stoves — Although the de- 
mand is not brisk, trade during the past 
week has been steady. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Busi- 
ness in doors amounts to but little, but a 
fair business has been done during the past 
week in screen windows. 

Green Wire Cloth — There is still a 
little of this going out at $2 per 100 square 
feet. 

Cutlery — There is a nice business being 
done in small quantities of pocket and 
table cutlery. 

Sporting Goods — There has been a little 
movement during the past week in guns, 
rifles, revolvers and ammunition. 

Mrs. Potts Sad Irons — A further re- 
duction in the price of Mrs. Potts sad irons 
is announced. No. 55 polished are now 
quoted at 75c. per set and No. 50 nickel- 
plated at 80c. per set. 

Cement — Local trade is still lighter than 
at outside points. A good movement, 
however, at steady prices keeps up. We 
quote as follows in barrel lots : Cana- 
dian Portland, $2.80 to $3 ; Belgian, $2.75 
to $3; English do., j?3; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, 51.25 to $1.50 ; calcined plaster, 
$i.qo; asbestos cement, $2.50 per bbl. 

Tacks — As we go to press, a change 
is announced in the discount on tacks, but 
lack of time prevents our doing anything 
beyond barely mentioning the fact. 
METALS. 

There is not a great deal of business being 
done in metals, although for tinplates and 
galvanized sheets a fairly active business is 
to be noted. 



Pig Iron — The outside markets continue 
to rule weak, a further reduction having 
taken place. The buying is only of a hand- 
to-mouth character. Prices are nominally 
unchanged. 

Bar Iron — The demand is fairly goodi 
but prices are somewhat irregular, some 
houses quoting as low as $2. 10 Toronto and 
Hamilton. 

Hoop Steel — A fairly good business 
is still to be noted and prices are unchanged 
at $3.25 base. 

Pig Tin — The market during the past 
week has been decidedly firm, and Thurs- 
day's cable announced an advance of £2 
15 s. in London for futures. Prices are also 
higher in the United States, and on Thurs- 
day in New York #32. 45 was bid, and 
$3 2 -75 per ton asked. Locally, there is 
some irregularity in prices, on account of 
certain dealers not following the outside 
markets as closely as others, but the ruling 
prices are 34 to 36c. per lb. Trade has 
been fairly good and stocks are still light. 

Tinplates — Are a little easier in Eng- 
land, but no change is to be noted here. 
The cause of the easier feeling in Great 
Britain is the lightness of the demand while 
the threatened strike has been averted. 
Thereis a fairly good demand on the local 
market for this time of the year. 

Tinned Sheets — Trade is only fair, 
and prices are unchanged. 

Galvanized Sheets — Trade is fairly 
good, and the quantities wanted are fairly 
large. We quote : 28 gauge at $5 in case 
lots for English, and $4.60 for American 
in ton and half-ton lots. Smaller quantities 
are 15c. higher in both kinds. 

Black Sheets — Trade has been fairly 
good in this line during the past week, and 
the base price is unchanged at $3.60. 

Iron Pipe — Trade is fairly good and 
improving. The new prices recently adopted 
are being maintained by the local dealers. 
Discounts are now as follows : Black pipe, 
)£ to Yi, inch, 40 per cent.; J^ inch, 60 per 
cent.; % to 2 inch, 66% percent.; larger 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent. Galvanized pipe: 
% inch, 40 per cent. ; Jf to 2 inch, 50 per 
cent. These prices are for carlots and f.o.b. 
Montreal. For small lots, 10 per cent, is 
added. 

Lead Pipe — Business in lead pipe is im- 
proving a little. We quote 7c. per lb., 
with discount 15 percent., f.o.b. Toronto. 

Lead — An improvement is also to be 
noted in this line. The price is unchanged 
at 5 to sH c - P er pound. 

Solder — Trade is good and more active 
than it was a week ago. We quote : Half- 
and-half, 21 to 22c. per lb.; refined, 20 to 
21c, and wiping, 20 to 20^c. 

Antimony — There has been a little 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ', 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and * 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.V. 

DERBY SIS A P. 

With Plated Rust Proof 
and Guarded Spring. 

" THE LATEST AND BEST." 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 




Largest Variety, 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep- Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SKHD FOB CATALOGtTK TO 
Aaarleaa Shearer Mfg. Co.. Kaabna. N.H..CS1 




The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over the 
ordinary spring, and has twice the wear. In use 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives 
perfect satisfaction. Made only hy 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 
Hospital St , - - BIRMINGHAM. 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 



BURIVIAN& SONS', LIMITED 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Rnssia'sStablesand Field Maishal Lord Robert?. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Co. 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

H?5|| Main Office and Works, 

^^J^ Rochester, N.Y.. U.S.A. 

On sale all round the globe. 




H 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






movement in antimony during the past 
week at 1 1 to 1 1 %c. per lb. for Cookson's. 

Canada Plates — The volume of busi- 
nefs in Canada plates is small. We quote : 
All dull, $3.50; half-polished. $3 60. and 
all bright, $4. 

Copper — Ingot copper has ruled quiet 
during the past week, but the demand has 
been fair for sheet copper. We quote ingot 
at ig}4 to 20c, and sheet at 23 to 23#c 

Zinc Spelter — Although there is a little 
more business being done than there was, 
the movement is still light. We quote 7 to 
7#c. per pound. 

Zinc Sheets — The demand is fair for 
small lots. We quote 7>£c for casks and 
7#c for part casks. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There is still a fair trade doing. Paris 
green this week is firmer than last. There 
has been a heavy demand at prices quoted, 
though there is no advance. Linseed oil is 
still very firm. Some importers say that 
orders are now being booked in England 
for August and September, in expectation 
of an advance ; while buyers in England 
are taking all they can get at present prices. 
Present indications are that prices will be 
maintained all fall, if not raised, though 
other conditions may arise to keep them 
down. Turpentine, also, keeps firm, as do 
liquid paints at quoted prices. In Savannah, 
turpentine is reported to be firm. We quote 
as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, 56.87^; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2, 56. 12^ 
No. 3, 55.75; No. 4, $5 ; dry white lead is 
casks, 55.75. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75; 
No. I, in casks of 560 lb. ,$5 to $5.25; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., 85-25 to 55.50. 

Litharge and Orange Mineral — 
Litharge, 6 to 6}4c. ; orange mineral, 8 
to 8j£c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 6bc. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22j4c ; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Potty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.15 ; bulk, in bbls., 
% $1.95 ; bulk, in less quantities, 52.10. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, 51.90 
per barrel. 

Paris Green — Petroleum, bbls., 18c. ; 
arsenic, kegs, i8^c. ; drums, 50 and 100 
lb. i8^c. ; drums, 25 lb., ig}4 c - \ tin s. 1 
lb., 2o^c; tins, *4 lb. 22$fc; packages, 1 
lb., I9#"c. ; packages, % lb., 21 ^c. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 52. 50 per cwt. 
in barrels, and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less quan- 



84,000 Daily Production. 
S Factories. S Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
ovor tha World. 




20 Government!. 85',',, R.R., 90",, Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Sllvorcd, Bevelled Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 
of a durable, highly polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 

Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street. London, E.G.— 128 Hope Street, Glasgow— 
12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Paradise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address ; "Glass, St. Helens." Telepl 
68 St Helens. 



tity ; lump, ioc. in small lots, and 8c. in 
barrels. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, 51.20 to 5i-3° per 
gallon ; No 1 quality, 51.00 per gallon. 

Seal Oil — 54c. per gallon, and yellow 
seal at 45c. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 
to ioj^c. per lb. and 10^ to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
86c; boiled, 89c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 85c; 
boiled, 88c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, Guelph and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 71c; two 
to four barrels, 70c, delivered to outside 
points. Toronto, Hamilton, London, Sarnia, 
Walkerville, Chatham, Dresden, Wallace- 
burg and Amherstburg. 2c less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 

charged. 

GLASS. 

The market is very quiet and will likely 
continue so through the Summer. No 
change in prices is to be noted. We quote 
first break locally : Star, in 50 foot boxes, 
52.10, and 100-foot boxes, 5400; double 
diamond under 26 united inches, 56.00, 
Toronto. Hamilton and London ; terms 
4 months or 3 per cent., 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL 

The market has not improved, and the 
outlook for a good trade is not very bright, at 
least, for the rest of the month. We quote 
jobbers' prices : Agricultural scrap, 50c per 
cwt. ; machinery cast, 50c percwt.;stovecast 
scrap, 40c; No. 1 wrought scrap, 50c per 
100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 12c. per 
lb. ; bottoms, io^c ; heavy copper, 12c ; 
light scrap brass, 7c. ; heavy yellow scrap 
brass, ioc ; heavy red scrap brass, 10^ c ; 
scrap lead, 2jfc ; zinc, 2^c ; scrap rubber, 
5c. ; good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c. ; 
clean dry bones, 40 to 50c per 100 lb. 
PETROLEUM. 

A fair trade continues. Prices are steady 
and remain unchanged from last week. We 
quote as follows : Pratt's Astral, 18c. 
in bulk (barrels, ?i extra) ; American 
water white, 18c. in barrels ; Photogene, 



I7j^c; Sarnia water white, 17c in barrels; 
Sarnia prime white, 16c in barrels. 
COAL. 
There is a good demand, at present prices, 
and a brisk trade is doing. Some difficulty 
is experienced in getting cars to ship coal 
to Canadian points, owing to some Ameri- 
can lines refusing to allow their cars to 
run in Canada. Our quotations for 
anthracite on cars at Buffalo and bridges 
are: Nut, egg and stove, 54- 50 per gross ton, 
or 54. 01 per net ton ; grate, 54.25 per gross 
ton, or 33.79 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Sisal and manila rope are quoted lower. 

The discount on tacks has been changed. 

Wire nails are ioc and cut nails 25c. 
lower. 

Horseshoes are 25c. lower on iron, and 
40c lower on steel. 

The discount on pressed spikes has been 
increased to 25 per cent. 

The base price of smooth steel wire has 
been reduced 53 per 100 lb. 



RADIATOR MEN PICNIC. 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, 
Toronto, treated its employes to an. excur- 
sion on Saturday last. The rendezvous was 
St. Catharines, and everyone, from appren- 
tice to Manager John M. Taylor was there. 
Ample arrangemets were made for the 
entertainment and comfort of the excur- 
sionists. 

The full band of the Royal Grenadiers 
was in attendance, and an excellent pro- 
gramme of athletie sports was provided. 
There were races even for the ladies em- 
ployed by the firm, and the chief event was 
won by the telephone operator. 



Fo.eign coal shipments from Vancouver 
Island collieries for the month of June 
amounted to 97,532 tons. 

R. P. McLennan, of the hardware firm of 
McLennan, McFeely & Co., Dawson City, 
has taken a scow load of hardware to that 
place. Mr. McLennan brought a harness- 
maker to Dawson with him. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 9, 1900. 

The volume of business continues good. 
The mail order business has been exception- 
ally good this year. Horseshoe nails, tin- 
plates and zinc sheets show change of price 
this week. The recenf heavy rains have 
improved the crop outlook to a considerable 
extent, but not sufficiently to give any im- 
petus to the implement trade as yet. 
Building operations have been somewhat 
retarded by the heavy rains, but, owing to 
the early season, are much further forward 
than usual at this season of the year. 

The following is the price list for the week. 

Barbed wire, ioo lb $3 75 

Plain twist 3 75 

Staples 4 25 

Oiled annealed wire • 10 4 12 

11 4 19 

12 4 25 

13 4 40 

14 4 52 

15 4 65 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 4 00 

" 16 and 20 4 °S 

10 4 10 

8 4 15 

6 4 3° 

4 4 35 

3 4 4° 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 320 

20 to 40 3 25 

10 to 16 3 3° 

8 3 35 

6 3 4° 

4 3 7° 

3 3 95 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 4 65 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 515 

No. 2 and larger 4 9° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 5 20 

No. 2 and larger 4 95 

Bar iron, $2.90 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5 basis. 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 4 25 

18 to 22 gauge • 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb.., 12 

Imitation " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 12 75 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 35 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 4 50 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 and 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 45 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger n 25 

# 11 75 

" % and 5-16 1225 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 15 00 

# , 15 50 

Yi and 5-16 1600 

Solder 22 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 15 

Axes, chopping $ 7 00 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 p.c. 

Flat ' ' brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57^ p.c 

Bolts, carriage 5-16 and smaller 43^ p.c, 

# and larger 37^ p.c, 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 55 P-C- 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c, 

Plough 4° P-C 



Rivets, iron 37 % p.c. 

Copper, No. 8, lb 33 Vi c. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 65 

No. 1 1 25 

Linseed oil, raw, per gal 92 

boiled " 95 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 40 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 10 p.c. 

C.F. military Net. 

Loaded shells, Robin Hood, M $20 00 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 7 25 

Chilled 750 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Robin Hood 10 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned. ...... 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain .... 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

Turpentine, by barrel 83c. 

Less than barrel 88c. 



H 



CIVIC CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

At a meeting of the Water Committee of 
the Montreal Council, held last Monday, the 
following contracts were awarded : For 
meters, Drummond, McCall & Co., to be 
delivered as required ; for pipes, on similar 
terms, to The St. Maurice Foundry & 
Machine Co., of Three Rivers ; special 
castings, P. Amesso & Co., of Montreal ; 
brass castings, to Rubenstein Bros. ; for lead 
pipes, The Montreal Rolling Mills ; pig 
lead, The James Robertson Company ; tin, 
Mrs. D. J. Coghlin, Montreal, and scrap 
iron and lead to M. Cole, Montreal. 
General stores and cements were referred 
to a general committee to be decided upon 
later. 



MANUFACTURERS' CONVENTION. 

The Canadian Manufacturers' Association 
have fixed the dates for their big convention 
for Wednesday and Thursday, August 29 
and 30 next. The first evening will be 
spent in an informal reception at their 
rooms in the Board of Trade building, and 
the real business of the convention will 
occupy all day Thursday. Members will 
adjourn for luncheon in sections, those 
interested in the same lines lunching 
together, and in the evening a banquet will 
be held, at which it is hoped Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier and other prominent men will be 
present. A feature of the convention will 
be the entertainment provided for the wives 
of members. A special committee has been 
appointed to drive the ladies about the city 
during the day and take them to the 
Exhibition in the evening. 



Tenders are called for by James Osborne, 
general superintendent of the C.P.R., for 
the purchase of the company's sawmill and 
contents at Coal Creek, B.C. 



K 
H 

KHAKI 
K 
1 

FLOOR PAINT 



K 
H 

KHAKI 
K 
I 



FLOOR PAINT 



Description — The Khaki floor paint is 
the most fashionable and durable paint 
manufactured. 

It is also useful for steps, stairs, veran- 
dahs and all surfaces subjected to HARD 
WEAR. The " Khaki " is a pronounced 
success, and a large number of repeat 
orders have been received by the sole 
makers, The Canada Paint Company. 
There are 24 y^ gals, and 12 y 2 gals, 
respectively in a case — $1.10 per gallon. 
Package in case lots, free. Sample cards 
will be mailed to any address at home or 
abroad upon application to the manu- 
facturers of KHAKI. 

THE 

CANADA 
PAINT CO. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO AND MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



iiiminiiiiiiii iiiiiiii mi" 



* THE ADVERTISING ARENA. jt 



Il l limi WWW WIIIII I III I W I II I IHI I IIIM I 



M » M » M » M > 



A practice worthy of emulation is, says 
an exchange, that of those manu- 
facturers and wholesalers who put 
particular effort into the advertising de- 
signed to help the retailer sell the goods. 

Retailers, remarks Profitable Advertising, 
are separating into two classes — those 
whose advertisements depend more and 
more uponlowness of price for effectiveness, 
and those who depend less and less upon 
price. 

SAYINGS— OLD AND NEW. 

Doom dogs the heels of crime — and of 
poor ads. 

I see a dusk and awful figure rise — the 
ad. smith. 

He stood alone — the only one who did 
not use the papers. 

And still in a tone of dolorous pitch — he 
refused to advertise. 

My verses were as meaningless and stale 
— as some advertising. 

If 'twere done when 'tisdonethen 'twere 
well 'twere done quickly — advertising. 

Speak, for thou long enough has acted 
dummy — ye men who do not advertise. 

It is a hard matter to lie well — but some 
advertisers and circulation mien can do it. — 
Advisor. 

HINTS AS TO SHOW CARDS. 

The show cards which you use in the 
windows require a great deal of attention in 
several respects. 

In the first place, there is nothing which 
gives a store such a poor appearance as 
dirty or poorly-made show cards. The 
expense of having good show cards well 
made and of changing them often enough 
to keep them fresh and clean, is so little in 
comparison with the harm that untidy cards 
do, that there is no excuse for any firm not 
having the best. 

White cardboard for a window is to be 
preferred under most circumstances. When 
colored cards are used, care should be 
taken that the colors do not conflict with 
the colors of the goods on which they are 
placed. A lack of harmony in this respect 
will often spoil a very good window display. 
If colored cards are used, only one color at 
a time is a great deal better than having 
several colors in the same window. 

Again, the cards may be varied by using 
different colored inks on a white cardboard. 
This gives all the benefits of bright 
display without necessitating the purchase 
of different colored cardboards. 



In making show cards, taste should be 
displayed in the arranging of the words and 
figures, if anything but the price is on the 
card. It is better to have a white margin 
around the figures than to have the figures 
consume the whole of the space. This gives 
a much neater effect than when the whole 
card is filled. In the same way, the larger 
the window card the more white space 
around the edges may be used to make the 
card attractive. But take care that you do 
not have the cards so large as to hide the 
goods on which they are displayed. You 
must remember that you are not making a 
display of window cards, but a display of 
goods. I have noticed several windows 
lately in which about the only thing that 
could be seen at a distance was an array of 
window cards. The goods seemed almost 
insignificant in their quality in comparison 
with the signs. Too few window cards are 
even better than too many, although this is 
an extreme which should be avoided. — 
Chas. F. Jones. 

RUTS ARE FATAL TO SUCCESS. 

A manufacturer who feared that he might 
be getting into ruts, recently invited a friend 
to inspect his factory, says Success. As he 
explained his various methods, the friend 
was quick to see faults and offer suggestions. 
The manufacturer now claims that this 
interview pointed out to him ruts, the elimi- 
nation of which has saved him hundreds of 
dollars a week. 

Perhaps you cannot see the ruts you are 
running in. If you ask some friend, some- 
one who won't lie to please you, how your 
store, or factory, or place of business looks, 
how it compares with other places of busi- 
ness, he will probably point out a rut or 
two. 

It is an easy matter to get into a rut and 
very difficult to get out. What is to-day a 
dangerous rut may have been a perfect 
method at a time not long past, but con- 
ditions and times change. This is an era of 
up-to-date methods. 

Twenty-five years ago, a simple announce- 
ment in a local paper was all the advertising 
a dealer was called upon to do. To-day 
he must take more space ; he must write 
his advertisement more carefully and 
attractively. 

Ten years ago, if you did not happen to 
have what your customer wanted, he would 
take the best substitute you had. To day, 
he will get just what he wants from your 



neighbor. Almost any kind of store » 
do 25 years ago ; to-day, it must be well 
furnished, well lighted, well kept, am; 
have bright, courteous salesmen, or the best 
customers will not patronize it. 

NEW WORDS IN THE LANGUAGE OF 
BUSINESS. 

Imagine a business man of a hundred 
years ago transported to the present time, 
and attempting to read down the " want " 
columns of a modern newspaper, remarks 
an exchange. The motorman, the con- 
ductor, the district manager, the telegraph 
operator, the telephone girl, the elevator 
boy, the electrician, the lineman, the type- 
writer, the stenographer, the engineer — 
would convey no idea to his mind of the 
requirements and duties of the situations 
wanted. Fancy his inability to comprehend 
the shipping news, the commercial items, 
with the hosts of new words which modern 
transportation has introduced, such as the 
steamboat, the railroad, the express train, 
the freight train, the grain elevator. This 
gentleman of the olden time, who might 
have been a power in his financial world, 
could go to school to his nine year- old 
great-grandchild with advantage, for an 
understanding of the most simple terms of 
commerce and trade. 

ADS. THAT KICK BACK. 

Extravagant offers create wrong ideas of 
values in the minds of ad. readers and make 
it more difficult to appeal to these same 
people with straightforward honest adver- 
tising, because such offers teach these people 
to expect too much for their money, re- 
marks Advertising Experience. They get 
such extravagant ideas that it becomes 
almost impossible for the legitimate dealer 
or mail-order house to please them. 

Exaggeration and clever juggling of words 
which is so prevalent in certain classes of 
advertising to-day, is doing as much harm 
as the out-and-out dishonest advertising is 
to undermine the confidence of ad. readers 
in all advertising. This subtle kind of dis- 
honesty is even more dangerous than is the 
straightforward dishonesty of some adver- 
tisers, if it may.be called such. People 
who are wronged by such advertising, if 
they are not led on by the very charm that 
the taking of risks may have for them, learn 
to regard all advertising as being at least 
exaggerated and to be taken with a grain of 
salt. 

All such dishonest and scheme advertising 
and all low-grade advertising, honest though 
it may be, tends to discourage the better 
classes of people from looking through the 
advertising pages of periodicals which con- 
tain this class of advertisements. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



TORONTO PLUMBING CONTRACTS. 

GUEST & CO. have the contract for 
the plumbing and gasfitting in Mr. 
Richardson's four houses on Bolton 
avenue. 

W. Mashinter & Co. have secured the 
contract for the hot-water heating in Smith 
& Barnes' hotel, St. Thomas, Ont. 

Purdy, Mansell & Co. have been given 
the contract for the plumbing and steam- 
heating in the new addition to the Robt. 
Simpson building. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

A church is being erected at Zenda, Ont. 

John T. James is building a new store at 
Bridgeburg, Ont. 

An Anglican church is being built at 
Brookholm, Ont. 

A Roman Catholic church will shortly be 
built in Lanark, Ont. 

A new St. James' church is being erected 
in Hull, Que. 

A Presbyterian church is being built at 
Baldur, Man. 

Mrs. Lawley is building a residence at 
Manitou, Man. 

Presbyterians at Ashcroft, B.C., are build- 
ing a new manse. 

A new normal school building is being 
built at Wolfville, N.S. 

Charles Dance will build a residence in 
Kingsmill, Ont. 

A new Roman Catholic church is being 
built in Havelock, Ont. 

Fortin & Gravelle are building a hotel for 
Mr. Gauthier, at Hull, Que. 

A new Presbyterian church is being 
erected in Liverton, Ont. 

A Methodist church is being built at 
Holly, Ont., to cost $2,000. 

The Roman Catholics are building another 
chapel in Sydney, N.S. 

A. F. Douglas is commencing the build- 
ing of a large house at Brule, N.S. 

E. B. Tryon, Fred. Hall and J. O'Leary 
are building a house at Cedarville, P.Q. 

Work will soon commence on the new 
N.P. R. station at Portage la Prairie, Ont. 

The people of Alexandria, Ont., are trying 
to get the Government to build a post office 
in that town. 

A factory for the manufacture of staves, 
hoops and heading will be established in 
Glasgow, Ont. 



The Parkhill Basket Manufacturing Co. 
will build a new factory in the fall, at Owen 
Sound, Ont. 

Dr. Beeman, Mallorytown, Ont., is 
making extensive improvements on his 
buildings. 

P. F. Curtis is building a three-storey 
brick store in Baldur, Man. It will cost 
about $6, 000. 

The Anthes Manufacturing Co., Berlin, 
Ont., intend to build a large addition to 
their factory in the near future. 

A boys' reformatory will be built in 
Oxford County ; the building operations 
will be commenced in the fall. 

A large office and store building is to be 
erected at once in Phoenix, B.C. It will be 
two storeys high, with 5 stores and 13 
offices. 

The following building permits were issued 
in Ottawa, last week : Peter Craigie, a solid 
brick house, Spruce street, $600 ; Richard 
Cornwall, frame dwelling, Willow street, 
$600; Belinda Harris, double brick veneered 
house, Cooper street, $5,000 ; W. G. 
Saunders, rough cast kitchen, Fourth 
avenue, $500 ; Chas. Bird, brick veneered 
house, James street, $1,000; Israel Pare, 
frame house, Sherwood street, $200. 

The following building permits have been 
issued in Toronto during the week: Lawrence 
Bros., two-storey addition to bakery, 48 and 
50 Denison avenue, $2,000 ; Mrs. Mark 
Irish, two-storey brick dwelling, 406 Jarvis 
street $3,500 ; M. Hutton, two-storey brick 
house, 67 Queen's Park, $1,500 ; Toronto 
Railway Co., coal building, on Cosmopolitan 
Wharf, $1,000; Mrs. Shingler, two storey 
brick dwelling, Wright avenue, near Mac- 
donald avenue, $1,600; T. H. George, 
three-storey brick residence, 72 Avenue 
road, $3,000 ; Thos. Buckley, two storey 
rough-cast dwelling, 53 River street, $1,000. 



an average annual death rate of 144 per 
thousand during 1894 98, compared with 
a like rate of 40.6 per thousand between 
1845 54. there has been a saving of 40 050 
lives per annum out of the average popu- 
lation of the last five years. Another notice- 
able point is Chicago's marked reduction in 
the proportion of infant and child mortality 
to the total mortality of all ages. The 
figures demonstrate a reduction of 30 per 
cent, under one year ; of nearly 56 per cent, 
between one and two years ; and of more 
than 45 per cent, between two and five 
years. It is confidently claimed that the 
improvement all round will be more marked 
now that the drainage canal is in operation. 
There are, however, those who insist that 
Chicago's gain in this respect will be at the 
cost of those cities lying near the waters 
into which the canal drains. 



AN OPEN LETTER. 



WATER PURIFICATION. 

Water purification, up to date paving of 
the thoroughfares of cities, and improved 
conditions of construction and sanitation in 
dwellings have been productive of increased 
longevity among the citizens. Chicago is 
one case in point. In that city, according 
to Fire and Water, the average duration of 
life has more than doubled in a single 
generation. In 1869 the average years lor 
the total number of those who died were only 
13.9. In 1898 they were 29.4 — an increase 
of III. 5 per cent. Taking the figures of 
population as a basis, these show that, with 



To the Apprentices to Canadian Plumbers. 

Our Dear Sirs, — How high the quality 
and standard of the Canadian sys- 
tem of plumbing shall be in a few 
years rests largely with you. The present 
generation of plumbers is going to be dis- 
placed by another class that is growing up, 
and just as the Canadian people seek counsel 
from our present authorities on plumbing, as 
to what sanitary improvements shall be 
ujtroduced, and as to what system shall be 
••J^taUed, so they will continue to look in 
future years to their plumbers for reliable 
information. Those who are now apprentices 
shall in that day be the authorities who do 
the advising. Consequently the country has 

SOMETHING TO DEMAND OF YOU. 

It demands that you fit yourselves for the 
coming responsibilities. 

And these responsibilities are not to be 
considered lightly. For, if you have the 
fixing of the standard of Canadian plumb- 
ing you have the opportunity to improve the 
economic condition and comfort of the 
Canadian people. You have, then, a mighty 
obligation resting upon you. Economic 
prosperity is dependent upon the energies of 
a people, energy is incompatible with poor 4 
health, and health is influenced, perhaps 
more than we as yet imagine, by our sanitary 
condition. How we, as Canadians, are 
going to fare for good scientific sanitation it 
remains with you to say. You have chosen 
a trade, but with that trade comes responsi- 
bilities which you must share with your con- 
freres. If, as individuals, you fail to share 
the responsibility and refuse to meet it, you 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






MANUFACTURERS 
OF 



and 



FULL WEIGHT. 
BEST QUALITY. 



PLUMBERS' 
STEAMFITTERS' 
SUPPLIES 



TheJas. Morrison Brass Mfg.Co. 



TORONTO 



Limited. 




HOT WATER 
INSTANTLY, 

NIGHT OR DAY. 

Boiling Water 
in a Minute. 
Hot Bath When Wanted 



EWARTS 

"LIGHTNING" 
GEYSER 

FOR GAS OR OIL. 

346 EUSTON ROAD, 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 

rilustrated Price List Free. 



Alarm, Double Stroke 

BicycllBells 



Manufactur. 
by . . . 



The Ontjr\r>o 
Lantern «J | 
Company. L 




Write for Prices to 



WALTER GROSE, MONTREAL 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESS~CLIPPING BUREAU, 

5'5 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE 

Tolephone Main 1255. 
X Front St. West, Toronto. Telephone 2M8. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will hr Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers ot 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 




KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardwara and Metal Broker 
Room 220"/, Board ofTrade, MONTREAL. 

SPECIALTIES C Brand Bona Nail* - cmmuU 
Bone Nail Oo, 

BOLTS— Tire and Stove Rivets ol all klndn <hnl 
craft Sir.'/. ( o, 

BRASS GOODS Ounn Castor Co., Limited, Bir- 
mingham, Bug, 



iARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

WORCESTER, MASS., U. S. A. 




",5= REVOLVERS 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE. 

For sale by Sporting Goods and 
Hardware Stores almost everywhere. 



Berlin Felt Boot Co. 



BERLIN, ONT. 



Manufacturers of . 



Guaranteed 
BEST and 
CHEAPEST 
in the 
market. 



HAIR FELT 



Made in 
12 INCH 

3/4 " 



For Water and Steam Pipe Covering. 

We keep a Large Stock to make Prompt Shipments. 



AS GOOD AS THE 
BEST, AND BETTER 
THAN MOST. 



The 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, CAN. 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 




Every ohainlguaranteed Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., lmm 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



are proving false to a trust that society has 
imposed upon you. It does not behoove you 
to enter upon your task with 

TOO LIGHT A HEART. 

Remember that you have chosen a life work. 
You draw from it a regular wage, but you 
also draw a responsibility whether you wish 
or no. 

In this country, plumbing and artificial 
sanitation is in its infancy. And yet, 
already, good plumbing is essential to human 
comfort. But it will become more and more 
indispensable. You must remember that 
the majority of towns throughout this 
Dominion have yet to install a system of 
waterworks. You must remember that^the 
sewerage question is a burning one in large 
cities, like Toronto and Montreal, at the 
present time. You must understand that 
there are going to be radical changes from 
the system now in vogue. You must not be 
passive ; activity and watchfulness should 
be your watchwords. Truly, we are blessed 
with a conscientious and well-posted class 
of plumbers at the ptesent time, but they 
are of this age and you are of the next. 
See that you 

FILL YOUR PLACES 

in the next age as well as they have in this. 
That is all that is demanded of you and 
that at least should be your aim. 

The first thing you must do to achieve 
your aim is to equip yourself with mechani- 
cal and technical knowledge. The former 
can be acquired more easily than the latter. 
In your apprenticeship you will learn to 
make a joint ; there is no doubt of that. 
You will also learn that hot air rises, and, if 
cold air can rush in and take its place, a 
draft will be created ; that is quite simple. 
But you know you must have more than 
that knowledge for a thorough equipment. 
To be able to attach a stove does not make 
you a competent plumber. There is, withal 
this, the necessity of scientific knowledge. 
You must be able to discuss the relative 
merits of systems of heating, ventilating and 
lighting. You must have opinions. You 
must be acquainted with all the latest ideas 
of plumbing. We hear that the Toronto 
plumbers have a "trap" method of pre- 
venting sewer gas irom being conducted 
into a house ; the Montreal plumbers venti- 
late by a pipe through the building. Which 
method do you prefer ? It rests with you to 
study such things. By such means you will 
improve yourself, and some day you all 
may be as 

GREAT AUTHORITIES ON PLUMBING 

and sanitation as Mr. J. W. Hughes, of 
Montreal. Nearly all successful men in your 
line have had to go through a thorough 
course of training similar to this. Mr. 
Edward Gurney, of the Gurney Foundry 



Company, studied moulding from it simplest 
to its most complex principles, and his son 
has made a similar study of heating. You 
can, then, see the necessity of informing 
yourself, and of acquiring an intimate 
knowledge of the science upon which your 
trade is based. You are blessed with a 
trade about which you cannot know too 
much. Moreover, the only way you can 
acquire that knowledge is by your own 
individual exertions. You have a chance to 
excel in your trade, and we wish you to 
appreciate it. You have shown the com- 
mon sense to adopt a trade in which the 
pay is high and success plentiful, see that 
you continue to exercise that good judg- 
ment by applying yourself diligently. 
Read all the books on sanitary science you 
can beg, borrow or buy. Be sure, the 
season of fruitage will come. Such 
endeavors will bring you financial success 
and raise you in the respect of the com- 
munity. 

Some day you will be tendering on con- 
tracts. You will then have to court favor 
with certain men. Your 

INTIMATE KNOWLEDGE 

with your trade will give you confidence 
and will instil confidence into those with 
whom you deal. Education is a fine 
qualification in any trade, but it is peculiarly 
handy in the plumbing trade. As the 
writer of this letter was talking to a Montreal 
plumber this week, this gentleman told us 
that he had made a mistake quite recently 
when figuring on a contract, and had 
tendened $100 less than the job was really" 
worth to him. He did not discover his 
mistake till after he had been given the con- 
tract and had commenced work upon the 
job. He then could not recede, but was 
forced to go ahead and take his medicine. 
Now, that man had not the requisite amount 
of education, evidently, to succeed in busi- 
ness. It was a "slip," but a careful man, 
one who had thoroughly fitted himself as an 
apprentice for his business career, would not, 
in all probability, have made the mistake. 
That illustrates the benefit of an education. 

EDUCATE YOURSELVES, 

Canadian apprentices, and you will be 
better all-reund men ! Again, education 
and technical knowledge are as essential as 
practical knowledge to a successful plumber. 

We shall have something to say to you 
again. 

With Best Wishes, 

The Plumber and Steamfitter. 
Montreal, July 9, 1900. 

[P.S. — Employers who are subscribers to 
Hardware and Metal are requested to 
kindly let their apprentices have their copies 
of the paper. If they read it, they will 
appreciate it. — Ed.] 



MONTREAL BOILER MEN STRIKE. 

THE movement of the boilermakers in 
Montreal for an advance of wages 
has culminated in a general s^ce. 
The employes of the Grand Trunk and 
Canadian Pacific railways relinquished 
their employment last Friday, and on 
Saturday the men in the employ of private 
firms, notably those of Mr. John McDougall, 
Caledonia Works, William Street, W. C.*- 
White and J. & R. Weir, were ordered 
out. 

Altogether, about 250 men have given up 
their positions. They demand an increase 
of 10 per cent, in the rate of wages and the 
adoption of a minimum wage. The em- 
ployers were notified of the fact by circular 
three weeks ago that unless these demands 
were complied with a strike would ensue. 
The wages of the strikers having been run- 
ning from 23 to 33c. an hour, a rate which 
the employers say is in excess of the amount 
paid in other Canadian cities. But the 
workmen claim the conditions of trade are 
such at the present time as to warrant a 
general advance to all classes of workmen. 

Altogether the dispute seems to be one 
that could be settled amicably if a powerful 
board of conciliation was in existence. 

The strike may cause a suspension of 
other branches of engineering work which 
are dependent upon the boilermakers, par- 
ticularly as the Montreal men compose a 
local branch of the International Union, 
which" may render it difficult for the em- 
ployers to import others to take the vacant 
plac.es, . "■ 

' — ^ 

WHAT A WOMAN DID WITH A POT 
OF PAINT. 

A woman will put paint, as well as hair- 
pins, to a good many uses. This is evident 
irom a letter which Mr. W. H. Evans, one 
of the partners of the Canada Paint Co., 
received recently. The letter is signed by 
Mr. C. P. Black, of Montreal. His wife, it 
appears, had bought a small tin of No. 3 
size of The Canada Paint Co' s "Manhattan" 
coach black, one of the lines of prepared 
varnish colors. With this she painted two 
drawing-room wicker armchairs, one draw- 
ing-room wicker plain chair, one drawing- 
room table, one inkstand, one lawn sprinkler 
and frame, one four-foot easel, and finally 
a straw hat. And her husband says she 
has still some left and is looking around for ♦ 
something more that would look well in a 
brilliant black. 



Mr. J. Hopper, general merchant, Coats- 
worth, Ont , left the past week for a visit to 
his old home, Frosterly, England. He will 
also visit the Paris Exposition, returning in 
about two months. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ISLAND CITY 




The best way for a hardware dealer to insure the success 
of his business is to handle 

The Island City Mixed Paints 
Floor Paint dries hard in 8 hours 
The Island City Varnishes 
The Island City White Lead 
The Island City Pure Colors in Oil 
and Japan. 

Customers are sure when they buy our Island City Paints 
that they get the best value for their money. 



P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, 

TORONTO, HALIFAX, 'WINNIPEG 



188-190 McGill Street 
MONTREAL. 



ALUMINUM SAFETY CHAIN 





C^ 



We are now making ALUMINUM "PLUMBERS" and " REGULAR " 
SAFETY CHAIN. The price is low, and for many purposes it is better than the 
ordinary chain. We, of course, continue to manufacture the brass chain, making 
all the standard sizes and styles together with a complete assortment of accessories 
such as Shooks, Split Links, etc. Special Plumbers' chain price list on application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, Niagara Falls, Canada 



We illustrate a few of our . . 



WE HAVE OTHERS. 



TRUCKS 



SPECIAL TRUCKS MADE TO ORDER. 



WVVVVVWlWWlWlrWWV\ 





Send for Catalogue. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. 



74=0 CEAIG STEEET, 



3MZ O IN" T IR E -A. L 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 

Montreal. 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England. 

Manufacturers of___^^^B^ 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., ■ • MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



Portland 
Cements 



~""~ BEST BRANDS. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Drain Pipes, 
Calcined Plaster, 

and a full stock of 

Builders' and Contractors' Supplies. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

W. McNally & Co. 

MONTREAL. 



SSXO' 




HOOEi/ 



2 Dos. 



Wo. 102 



TRADE MARK 

SAVE MONEY BY BUYING 

6unrfs Patent 
Brassic Goods 




Equal to solid brass in every particular. Cost 
less money — look and wear as well. Sales increas- 
ing all the time. 



THE GUNN CASTOR CO., Limited. 

KNOX HENRY, 

Canadian Agent, 220 Board of Trade Montreal 



Emerson, the Philosopher 




THIS CUT SHOWS 

Our Double First Floor Outfit 

FOR 

..HEAVY OILS.. 

These tanks are built with a "pocket" in 
which the pump stands always submerged in 
oil, hence there is no "sticking" or "gum- 
ming." Accurate GALLONS, HALF- 
GALLONS AND QUARTS. They will 
handle Varnishes, Raw and Boiled Lin- 
seeds, Turpentines, Fillers and Non-Lubri- 
cants generally to your entire satisfaction. 
.Catalogue free. Send your address. 



Wrote — " To feel 
that our efforts 
are appreciated 
is the sweetest 
part of life." The 
Good, Gray Poet's 
words " ring true." 
Appreciation is sweet 
when it comes not as 
flattery, but as an hon- 
est sentiment. We 
submit the following : 



FORT WAYNE 
DRUG CO. 

IMPORTERS AND 
JOBBERS OF 

Drugs, Varnishes 
Oils, 

Chemicals and 
Sundries. 

Fort Wayne, Ind., 

May 17, 1900. 

S. F. Bowser & Co., 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Gentlemen : — We 
are pleased to say 
that the Fifteen Oil 
Tanks which we have 
of various sizes are in 
first-class condition 
after being used over 
a year. All of these 
have rendered excel- 
lent service. We 
would be at a loss if it 
were impo-sible for us 
to duplicate any or- 
der for these goods. 
We cannot under- 
stand how any house 
can call themselves 
well 1 quipped con- 
ducting a first-class 
business without the 
Bowser Self-Measur- 
ing Oil Tanks. With 
kindest regards we 
are 

Very truly yours, 
Fort Wayne Drug 
Co. 

Per F. W. Sihler, 
Sec'y. 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., :. 



0. Box 564, TORONTO. 
Factory: FOR' WAYNE, IND. 



EXTENDED 
INSURANCE. 



One of the many liberal features embodied in the 
UNCONDITIONAL ACCUMULATIVE POLICY 

issued by the 

Confederation 
Life Association. 

HEAD OFFICE-TORONTO. 



is the provision for Extended Insurance. After three full annual premiums 
have been paid, the insured is entitled to Extended Insurance for the full 
amount of the policy for a term of years definitely stated therein. Paid-up 
and Cash Values also guaranteed. . 

Rates and full information sent on application to the Head Office, To* 
ronto, or to any of the association's agents. 



W. C. Macdonald, 

Actuary. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

Managing Director 



A HARDWAREMAN'S MARRIAGE.! 

J. R. Coate, of Adams & Coate, hardware merchants, Kings- 
ville, Ont., was married to Miss Mabel, youngest daughter of Jas. 
King of Kingsville Gas Co. The happy couple are spending their 
honeymoon in Chicago and the West. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent andMetal Broker 

^■ar* >3 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Kepreaenting Itrit ieh and American manufacturers of 
TinplatoJ, Tinned htoeoo, Terne Platen, Canada Plates, Gal- 
vanized Sheets, Imitation KussiaSheeta. BlMl Sheets— Iron 
and Steel— Hoops and Bands, Proved Coil Chain.Brass and 
Copper Sheets. Norway Iron and Steel. Wheelbarrow* .ete. 




VanTnyl 4 Fairbank 



Pot roll a, Ont. 
Headquarters for . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps.Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools. Gables, etc. 



(jC'Hcr--~b.4d-t4 en, o/>i>c<c<JCLe>/t. 



COOPER PATENT ELBOWS 

Bright and Common. 




(i 



E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

Sole Manufacturers 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

<«, 
%%& 

JARDINE" 
TlRt UPS£YTEfeR& 
Wtt-L MPSBt TJRES 

Some machines sold as TJpsetters will aotfA 
Perhaps you make as much moneynn thV 
sale of a useless Upsetter as on A good 
one, but your customer does not. He 
don't want a machine because it iapalled 
an Upsetter he wants a machine to upset 
tires. Sell him one of ours. 



IT PAYS TO SELL THE BEST TOOLS 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



^AAAA\AAAA^^AA^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV\^ 




BERGERS HOOKS 



SOIL PIPE HOOKS 

GAS PIPE HOOK8 

PLUMBERS' HOOKS 

CAS PIPE STRAPS 

FLASHING HOOKS 

Wrought or malleable, as desired. Large stock. Pel 
feet goods. Write for catalogue and prices. 



BERGER BROS. CO. 



Mfrs. of Tinners' and 
Rooters' SUPPLIES 



231 and 237 Arch st.. Philadelphia 




MANUFACTURERS 



Babbitt Metals . . . 
Tinners' and Plumbers' Solder 
Ingot Brass, etc. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

Pig Tin, Pig Lead 
Ingot Copper . . 
Antimony, etc. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. Faclor,es: M0 " T,,EAL 



and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, gHgBMB; 



STEVENS RIFLES 




Send for our complete catalogue. 



THE FAVORITE 

is made in three calibres 

22, 25 and 32 Rim Fire 

and is the best low-priced rifle made. Highest quality of work 
Accuracy guaranteed. Weight, 4>4 lbs. 

No. 17, Plain Sights— List $ 8.00 
No. 18, Target Sights— " 11.50 
No. 19, Lyman Sights— " 12.00 



J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO. 



For Sale by All Leading Canadian Jobbers 
At Trade Discounts. 



P.O. Box 215, CHICOPEE FALLS, 

MASS., U 



S.A. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, -white and colored, Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INQUIRIES ABOUT CANADIAN 
PRODUCTS. 

THE following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the office of the High Com- 
missioner in London : 

i. A London firm inquire for the names of Canadian 
manufacturers of carriage woodware for export. 

2. A firm of india rubber and gutta percha manufac- 
turers in Glasgow desire to appoint a reliab'e agent to 
have the sole control of the sale of th'-ir goods in 
Canada. 

3. An old established London firm are open to repre- 
sent Canadian woollen manufacturers. 

4. Inquiry has been received from a London house 
desiring to receive samples of oatmeal, pearl barley 
aud similar products, in 7 and 14-lb. tins and kegs. 
Also golden syrup in 1 and 2-lb. tins. 

5. A Scotch firm of produce brokers and imporiers 
are open to buy flaky bran from Canada for shipment 
during tbe fall. 

6. A firm of wholesale booksellers and stationers are 
desirous of developing their export trade, and would be 
glad to hear from Canadian houses. 

[The names of the firms making the above 
inquiries will be supplied on application to 
the editor of Hardware and Metal. 
When inquiring kindly give date of issue 
and number of paragraph.] 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the follow- 
ing inquiries : 

1. A firm forming an important connection in the 
South-African market consider that trade might be 
established there in Canadian biscuits of a suitable 
quality, and is prepared to hear from Canadian makers. 

2. A Scotch manufacturer of sheep dips and veterinary 
specialties wishes to introduce these articles into 
Canada. 

3. A Glasgow firm asks for names of Canadian manu- 
facturers of excelsior packing. 

4. A house in Copenhagen would like to hear from 
Canadian exporters wishing to extend their relations to 
Denmark. 

5. A Sheffield hjuse is open to purchase supplies of 
doors, joinery and barrows. 



THE PROVINCIAL BANK OF CANADA 

It will be remembered by the trade that 
the suspension of La Banque Ville Marie in 
Montreal last July caused a run upon La 
Banque Jacques Cartier, which caused it to 
also suspend payment. However, it 
reopened business in October, and has been 
in a healthy condition since that time. But, 
to remove all traces of the unfortunate 
occurrence and to strengthen the weak spots 
that were then brought into view, a reorgani- 
zation has been going on since last fall that 
has now culminated in a new charter and a 
change of name. 

The new bank is to be called "The 
Provincial Bank of Canada." It will con- 
tinue to do the French-Canadian business 
of La Banque Jacques Cartier but will also 
extend beyond that sphere as far as possible. 
The board of directors of La Banque 
Jacques Cartier have withdrawn to make The 
Provincial as new as possible. The officers 
are the same gentlemen with the exception 



of the vice-president, who is now Mr. Geo. 
B. Burland. Mr. G. N. Ducharme resumes 
the presidency and Mr. Bienvenu is again 
general manager. 

The board of directors will include such 
men as Hon. Louis Beaubien and Aid. H. 
Laporte. The capital of the bank has been 
increased and it is now regarded as a first- 
class bank. A glance at the constitution 
shows that great care has been taken to 
protect the customers of the bank, as well 
as the depositors. Sir. Alex. Lacoste has 
accepted the presidency of the new board of 
censors. 



THE SCHOOLMASTER ABROAD. 

In a provincial town in England, where 
the new khaki color is seen everywhere 
from neckties to umbrellas, and from shoes 
to bathing suits, the following sign was 
recently very prominently displayed from a 
draper's window : 



KHAKI COSTUME CLOTH, 

WARRANTED NOT TO 
RIP, 

WARE 
OR TARE! 



T 



BEATING THE CREDIT MAN. 

• i ' I 'HE most common method of beat- 
ing the credit man is that of 
' working ' several cities at the 
same time and on the same basis of credit," 
writes Mr. H. N. Higinbotham, the great 
Chicago merchant, in The Saturday Even- 
ing Post. "Suppose the merchant in 
question to be located in a small town in 
the southern part of Illinois, near the 
Mississippi River. He comes to Chicago 
and says that he has decided to buy all his 
goods here because he can get better prices. 
His statement shows that he has $4,000 in 
the local bank. As he only wishes for a 
credit of $3,000 and a time limit of 60 
days, the way seems very clear, particu- 
larly as the bank verifies his statement 
regarding the condition of his banking ac- 
count. 

"The credit is given and the customer 
repeats this operation in two or three other 
cities not too far distant from his town. 
Then he turns about and sells out the goods 
by sensational methods and flees with the 
money. Usually this is after he has started 
in business. A remedy against this kind of 
of a game is to keep close track of every 
customer. If he appears to be piling up a 
very heavy stock of goods, and resorts to 
' catch tricks ' in order to sell a heavy line 
of goods in a short time, seeming to be 
indifferent to the matter of prices, it is well 
to tighten the lines about him and double 
the diligence with which he is watched." 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a^^d 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned 
and endorsed " Tender for Dredging; Colhngwood, 
Ont.," will be received at this office until Friday, the 
20th July, iqoo, inclusively, for Dredging in the Harbour 
of Cullingwood, Out., according to a plan and combined 
specification and fo:m of tender to be seen at the office of 
H. A. Gray, Esq., Engineer in charge Harbour and River 
works for Ontario, Confederation Life Building, Toronto, 
on application to the Postmaster at Collingwood, Ont , 
and at the iJepariment of Public Works, Ottawa. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not 
be considered unless made on the forms supplied, and 
signed with their actual signatures. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted 
bank cheque made payable to the order of the Honour- 
able ihe Minister of Public Works, for five thousand 
($5,000.00) dollars, which will be forfeited if the party 
decline to enter into a contract when called upon to do 
so, or if he fail to complete the work contracted for. If 
the tender be not accepted tue cheque will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender 

By order, 

JOS. R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, June 2rst, 1900. 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity from the Department, will not be paid for it. (28) 



Refrigerators 

BUY 

EUREKA 

it is the best. 
WHY? 

1st. Because it is 
built on scientific princi- 
ples, having insulated 
walL it is easy on Ice. 

2nd. Because the sys- 
tem of circulation of air 
is perfect. 

3rd. Because it is well 
built. 

Further information 
can be obtained in cata- 
logue which is free. 

Address, 

Eureka 
Refrigerator Co. 

This cut represents No. 13. 54 Noble St., Toronto 



CELEBRATED 





Banner 
Cold 






rja 
tradp. ^rcknowledged 
to te superior to all 

fir 1 



Mfgd. by 

The Ontario 
Lantern Co. 



WALTER GROSE, MONTREAL 

Sole Sailing Agent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






.. 



J3 



MIDLAND 

^ BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
* very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 




We Manufacture^^- 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CUHHENT JVIABKET QUOTATIONS 



July 13, 1900. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
q i unities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large oash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 35 36 

Straits 35 36 

Tinplates. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S. , equal to Bradley. Per boi 

I.C., usual sizes $7 00 

IX, " 8 50 

„ I.X.X., " 10 00 

Famous— 

LO 7 50 

I.X 855 

IX X 9 50 

Raven A Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 5 25 

I.X., " 6 25 

I.X.X. " 7 25 

l.XXX., " 825 

DC. 12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 550 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O. , usual sizes 4 60 

LC, special sizes, base 4 85 

20x28 9 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 9 50 

I. X., Terne Tin 1150 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb 

X X.,14x56,50sheetbxs) 

" 14x60 " I 07 07% 

- 14x65, " ) ' 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08% 

'' 26 " 08% 09 

28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Base Pric» 

Common Bar per 100 lbs 2 30 2 35 

Refined " " .... 2 85 2 90 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 70 

Hocp steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 25 

Swedish " " 4 00 4 25 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 70 

Tire Steel 2 80 

; Machinery 3 25 

<h«t Steel, per lb 10 14 

Toe"Calk Steel 3 20 

• Russian Sheet, per lb 10Vi 11 

Tank Plates, 1-5 and thicker. 3 00 3 25 

• Boiler Rivets 4 50 5 

Boiler Tabes. 

1%-inch 13 14 

2 " 15 16 

*% " 18 19 

S " 19 20 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

% Inoh 3 25 

S-16 inch 3 40 

*4 nob. and thicker 3 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 «uge 3 20 

20 gauge 3 20 

22 to 24 " 3 30 

■» I' 340 

28 " 3 60 



Canada Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 50 

Half polished 3 60 

All bright 4 00 

Iron Pipe. 

Discounts are as follows -Black pipe, 
■"'« in., 4>per cent. % in., 61 per cent. \ to 
2 in., 86% per cent. 1 ir^er sues, 53 aud 5 
per cent. Galvanized pipe, % in.. 40 per 
cent. 3 4 to 2 in , 50 per cent. Prices are 
f.o.b. Montreal for cur lots ; snuller qiin- 
tities, 1J per cent higher. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer Head 

16 gauge 4 40 4 25 

18 to 24 gauge 4 60 4 20 4 40 4 50 

26 " 4 85 4 45 4 40 4 75 

28 > ' 5 10 4 70 4 60 5 00 

Less than case lots, 15c. per 100 lb. additional 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16in., per 1001b 

% " .... 8 50 

5-16 " " .... 6 00 

% '• " ... 5 45 

7-16 ' " ... 5 15 

% " " ... 5«0 

% " " ... 4 80 

% " " .... 4 75 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 and 5 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B.S., ton lots 19% 20% 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cutlengths, ound,%to%in. 23% 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
Untinned ,14 oz. . and light, 16 

oz., 14x43 and 14x60 23 23V4 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz, irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4<c6rt. 25 to301bs. ea., per lb 25% 

35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " 23% 

Boiler and T.K.Pitts. 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 
Roll and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge . 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled. 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 07 07% 

Domestic " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt.casks 07% 

Part casks 07% 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 05 05% 

Bar, 1 lb 0f, v , 

heots. 2%lhs sq. ft., by roll 05« 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs, ' 05% 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f o.b. Toronto. 

Note. — Cutlengths.net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths ins at 7% cents. 



Shot. 

Common, 86.50 per 1U0 lb. ; chilled, 87. CO 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and bal 1 , $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% p.o. Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on medium and extra 
heavy, and 45 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb 

Bar half-and-half 21 22 

Refined 20% 21 

Wiping 20 20% 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
Bolder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 
Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Percwt 
Pure, Assoc, guarantee, ground in oil 

251b. irons 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No. 4 do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 C9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 6 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %i % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 135 

Cauada Paint Cos Pure 120 

Sanderson Pearry's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 10 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

FrenchlmperialOreen t 19 

Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre ( J. C.) bbls .... 135 140 

Yellow Ochre (J. F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), percwt. 180 190 

Fnglish Oxides, percwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt .. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, percwt 175 2 00 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93 p c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Uml>er, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

rinlden Debre 03% 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb .... 07 



Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45, lb 8 J 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb.lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or bxs 2 25 

Bulk in bbls., per 100 1 95 

Bulk in less quantities 2 10 

25-lb. tins, 4 in case 2 35 

12%-lb. tins, 8 in case 2 60 

Varnishes. 

(In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 290 330 

body 8 00 9 U0 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 1 60 2 CO 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan ISO 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Discount— general trade discount, 50 per 
cent, and four months' time : fecial cash 
discount of 3 per cent in thirty days, or 3% 
per cent, spot cash. 

The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Cos , Limited 
Elastilite Varnish, 
1 gal. can, each. 
*2 0J. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2 00. 

Maple Leaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, EOc. : 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each. 




VARNISH 

r — 

!r«r[R10« f» FllERlOB 

... 

' ." — 

T..» IMPHIAI V*«rm« 



Linseed Oil. 

Raw. Boiled. 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 86 $0 89 

5 to 9 bbls " 85 fS 

Montreal. Toronto, Hamilton, Quebec, 

London, Ottawa, Kingston and Guelph, 
2c. less. 

Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... 071 

9 to 4 barrels " " 70 

Toronto, Hamilton, London, Guelph, 2c. less. 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb.. 10 10% 

" " small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOil, per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 120 

" Neatsfoot 

Glue. 

Common 08% 09 

French Medal 14 14% 

Cabinet, sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 023 030 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

Limited 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



f 

I 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




hardware:. 

Ammunition . 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Caps. Dam., 50 and 5 percent. 
Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 45 p. c, Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dam., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Rim Fire, Military, net list, Amer. 
Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 18 p.c Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dora- 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili 

tarv, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
net list. B. B. Caps, discount 45 per cent. 
Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. 
Brass shot Shells, 55 and 10 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thiok brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-Lb.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 7U 

7and8gauges 90 

5and6gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 115 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7and8gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Per lb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson &Cj.'s Anvils.. lb. 09 09V4 
Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices, .lb. 09% 10 

Augers. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, perdoz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 and 15 p c. 
Broad Axes, 33% percent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 fi 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 3 93 4 00 

Copper, discount 40 and 10 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

•• " " 2nd " 11 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

Tandem " A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 68% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Oongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', disoount 27% per cent. 



Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', perdoz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Norway Bolts, full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 50 

" " " full square. . . 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 52% 

Coach Screws 65 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 



Bolt Ends 62% 

Nuts, square 3%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4c. off 

Tapping Nuts 60 

Tire Bolts 6<i 

Stove Bolts 60 and 10 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 50 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% percent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, perdoz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred rooting, per 100 lb 1 60 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 8) 

Carpet felt, per ton 45(0 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in, 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loo3e Pin, dis., 6J per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " . .- 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulio 100 110 

Chalk. 
Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 



Chisels. 

Socket. Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 

Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
Churns . 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.50—^0.2. $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 18 
p.c. ; from stozk in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days, 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Outario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Filtinga 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Wa°hout 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 00 

Tlain Richelieu 4 75 

Emb. Richelieu 5 00 

Fittings 1 25 

ClOBet connection 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in f 5 

" oval, 17x14 in 155 

" 19x15 in 2 30 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

"6, " 15 

BoyntOn pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey'sRod, per doz (15 p.c) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 OU 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpeatera, dis. 70 percent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis.. 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard, dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, perdoz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz 1 60 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 27% per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 per cent, to 60, 

10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay. manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent 
revised list. 

FRUIT PRESSES. 

Henis', per doz 3 25 3 50 

Shepard's Queen City, dis. 15 per cent. 
GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under 26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 01 

26 to 40 2 31 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 00 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 75 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 7 25 .... 14 CO 

91 to 95 15 50 

96 to 100 18 00 

101 to 105 21 00 

106toll0 74 00 

llltoll5 28 00 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's diB. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 

HALTERS. 
Rope, % per gross 



2 40 



to'4 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



Leathtr, 1 in., perdoz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web. — perdoz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, perdoz 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08% 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., per lb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 100 125 

Plane. 

American, pergross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns . 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft.run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft. run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. . . . 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " 06'/ 4 

" " 6-in., " ... 0(6 

8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pair 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount, 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 1 10 ' 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Bat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand 50 p.c. d 
"M" brand 50 p.c, 

Acadian, ountersunk head and oval 
top and lOIper cent. 



-} 



Oval head. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






MALEHAM & YEOMANS, 



Highest Award 



Manufacturers of. 




Table Cutlery, Razors, 
Scissors, Butcher Knives 
and Steels, Palette and 
Putty Knives. 



SPECIALTY : 



Exposition Universelle, Paris, iSHy. 



Cases of Carvers and 
Cabinets of Cutlery. 



SHEFFIELD, 

ENGLAND. 






>x 



"W BRADSHAWfcSON 



(Granted I780. 
-~^f " 

WHOLESALE ONLY. 



F. H. SCOTT, 360 Temple Building, MONTREAL. 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. 3 >'o 3 9J 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 85 4 10 

Featherweight (all sizes) 5 10 5 10 

F.O.B. Toronto. Hamilton, London and 
Quelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1893. 

ICEPICKS. 

Star, per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7Vi pc. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per In 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEY8. 
Lock, Can., dis., <i7% p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 150 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door kmbs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 1 1 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per do*. . 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined 2 20 5 60 

Oalvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chain ,T 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis. 33' ■ p.o. 

Russell 4 Erwin, per doz 3 05 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 
English and Am., per doz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 15 to 17% p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCK8 
Canadian, per doz 8 50 100 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 60 $4 10 

3d 3 25 .177 

4and5d 300 360 

6 and 7d 2 90 3 45 

8 and 9d 2 75 3 25 

lOand 12d 2 70 3 20 

16and20d 2 65 3 15 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 60 3 10 

Steel Cut NailB 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 percent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 186 3 50 



NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 40 and 5 per cent, for Mr Mullen's. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Canada refined (Toronto) 13% 

Sarnia Water White 15 

Pratt's Astral 18 

Sarnia, Prime White 14 

American w. w 16% 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 1 25 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

CALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per rent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 10 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 

PICKS. 
P r doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross.... 1 50 3 00 

Brass head, " 40 100 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 55 per cent. 

American dis. 55. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 37% 

to 40 per oent. 
Bailey's (Stan. R. 4 L. Co. ), 50 to 50 and 5 p.c. 
Miscellaneous, dis. 25 to 27% per cent. 
Bailey's Victor, 25 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 
40 p.c. 

Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 
^German, per doz 60 2 60 

■J PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 

Impression work, discount, 6D per cent. 

Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 

Rough •stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, bO per cent. 

Jenkins' disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 

Standard valves, discount, £0 per per cent. 

Jenkins radiator valves, discount 55 per cent. 
" "«. .standard, dis., 60 p.e. 

Ouick opening valves, discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression baith cocli 2 00 

No. 4 " " . •• • 2 00 

No. 7. Fuller » .%.;-. 2 50 

No. 4%, " 3 00 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount, 25 per cenjt. 

f^LLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz t...,'.. 55 /DO 

Axle , 22 , 33 

Screw 27 i' LQ0 

Awning 35 T50 

PUMPS >V^ 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60» 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 7 25 

35 " 8 15 

40 " 9 25 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

r ' 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 

Cast steel and malleable Canadian list dis. 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 



RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 
RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'b 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile 4 Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 CO 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount,, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURKS. 
Carriage, Section, Wagon Box Rivets, etc., 

50 p c. 
Black M. Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets 4 Burrs, 35 p.c. dis., and 

cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets in 

%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Burrs, iron or steel, 45 per cent. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal. Manila 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9V 2 13% 

%in lu% 14% 

% and 5-16 in 12 15% 

Cotton bese, %-inch and 

larger 14 3 4 15 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per Bet. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polirhed 75 

" No. 50, nickle-plated.... 80 

Usual rebate on 12 and 50 1 ate lotp. 
SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B 4 A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand, Disston's. dis. 12% p.o. 
8.4D., 40 percent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. 4 D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Solid, " 1 50 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

< SCALES 

Gurney Scales, 45 p.c. 
B S. * M. Scales, 45 p.c. 
'Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 80 p.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 75 p.o. 
" F. H, brass, dis. 75 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 67%p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 67% p.c. 
RH. " 62% p.c. 

Drive ScrewB, 80 per cent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

8CYTHES. 
Discount, per doz, net 9(0 15 00 



SCYTHE SNATHS 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS 
Bailey Cu.lery Co . full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c. 
Seymour b, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Heinisch, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Seymour or Heinisch tailor shears. 15 p.c 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRON8. 

1, 1% lb., per lb IMM 

lb. or over, per lb 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p c. 

STAMPED WARE. 
P.ain, dis. . 75 and 12% p.c. iff revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 

STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 3 85 

Plain 00 3 60 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates cf 25 lengths. 

6 inch Per 100 lengths 8 00 

7 inch " " 8 jo 

Stove Polish. 




No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash .... $ 4 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Per cent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80,12%* 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 80 & 12% 

Carpet tacks, blued and tinned . .75 10 & 

' " (in kegs) 35 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . .70, 10 * 5 

" % weights 55 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In hulk 80 4 5 

In dozens 70,10 4 5 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 80, 12% 4 5 

11 brush, blued 4 tinned, bulk. .45 
" gimp, blued tinned and 

japanned 70,10 4 5 

Zinc tacks 30 

Leather carpet - acka 56 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52% 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



ALEXANDER GIBB, „ ,. „ ... A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Montreal -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Trunk nails,', Mack 65 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 5 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

11 '* in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, dozens 85 

bulk 35 

TAPE LINES. 

K- " -'- ..ss skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

_.„.,sn, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 2i p c. 
Game, H. & N„ P. S. & W.. 65 P.O. 
Same, steel, 72'/i, 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 

Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 21 

Wrapping, mottled, per pack. 50 60 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb 17 18 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand.perdoz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 percent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $3.00 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, ad 



vance 7o. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advance 7c— No. 11, 14c— No. 12, 
20c.-No. 13, 35c— No. 14. 47c-No. 15, 
60c— No. 16,75c. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, Sp- 
oiling, 10c — special hay-bailing wire, 30c. 
— spring wire, $1 — best steel wire, 75c — 
bright soft drawn, 15c — in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c — 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 12% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, $5.50-No. 19. $6-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, $7— No. 2:', 87.30— No. 23,' 
$7.65-No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
89.50— No. 27, SlO-No. 28. $ll-No 29, 
$12-No. 30, 813— No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15 
No. 33. $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, 10c— in 25-1* . bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c — 
in V>-lh. hanks, 75c- in ^-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c. — bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.95 
No. 9, $3.20— No. 10, $4.10-No. 11, $4.15 
No. 12, $3 35-No. 13, $3.45-No. 14,4 
$4.50— No. 15, $5.00— No. 16. $5.25. 1 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, L 

per 1,000 feet 3 30 I 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B 
Galvanized, 4 barb, 2\ and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 25 

Ralvanized, plain twist 3 25 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. c levelai d, $2.95 in 

Ipss tban carlotp, t nd $3.05 in carlots. 

Terms. 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 

Rofs braid truss cable 4 50 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . . 2 00 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37K per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 
Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. & K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 CO 

Royal American " 50 00 

i Discount, 45 per cent.: terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 
Canadian make, discount, 25 per cent. 



ESTABLISHED 
I860 



INCORPORATED 
1895 



Aluminum Camping On 



Light Durable 



Total weight for 6 men, 3 lbs. 5 ozs, Size of sej p 
Sets comprised as follows: 

One 8-qt. Pail, IO>£-in. diameter, 6>£-in. deep. 
One 6-qt. Pail, 9-in. diameter, 5)«-in. deep. 
One 4-qt. Pail, B-in. diameter, 5-in. deep. 
3 or 6 Cups (loose handles), 3% x 3-in. deep. 
3 or 6 Plates, 9-in. diameter. 

The whole set packs in large pail. Covers for all the pails are suitable ' 

for Frying pans, Stew pans, etc. 




READY FOR USE. 



THE TH0S. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



SEND foripecimen copy of Phillipn' Monthly Machinery 
Rogistor, containing over 5.000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established tad incut successful medium in the world. 
Kslulilisbed 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to those who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference by a lariie number 
of ilrniH. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
hi ^^i for all engineers and manufacturers Subscription, 
i'h ^PF annum, price per copy. 6d. Sole Proprietor, til \s. 
I). FiilLLira. Ml ME.. Newport, Mon., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport. Mon.' 

WHY sharpen your bar of steel ? 
USE only "Aylmer Drills." 
OLD fashioned drills waste time and money. 
WAYS change as inventions multiply 
Send for circular and prices to 
WM. J. CRAWFORD, 
Room 39, Canada Life Building, MONTREAL. 



R. 



C. LeVESCONTE 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc 

Th« McKinnon Building 
Cor. Jordan and Melinda Streets 

. . . TORONTO 

Telephone 689. 

Cable "LeVesconte" Toronto. 

To Cycle Makers 
and the Public: 

Notice is hereby given that J and 
H. M. Copeland's patented " Im- 
provements in Sprocket Wheel 
Clutches," No. 61918, Free Wheel 
Device, can be obtained from 

The Wortman and Ward Manufacturing Co, 

Limited 
LONDON, ONTARIO, CANADA. 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, 
and endorsed " Tender for Supplying Coal for the 
Dominion Buildings," will be received at this office until 
Tuesday, 24th [uly, 1900, inclusively, for the supply 
of Coal for the Public Buildings throughout the Dominion. 

Combined specification and form of tender can be ob- 
tained at this office, where all necessary information can 
be had on application. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not be 
considered unless made on the printed form supplied and 
signed with their actual signatures. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted bank 
cheque made payable to the order of the Honourable the 
Minister of Public Works, equal to ten per cent, of 
amount of the tender, which will be forfeited if the party 
decline to enter into a contract when called upon to do so, 
or if he fail to complete the work contracted for. If the 
tender be not accepted the cheque will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. 

By order, 
* JOS. R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, ) 

Ottawa, June 281b, tgoo. J 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity from the Department will not be paid for it. (29) 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. EI£ A l£ RK N.?. FF i c s E a 9 ° Ch ' nber ' st ' 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treaurar. 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,506,000. Offices throughout the civilized world. 

Executive Offices : 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and the con- 
trolling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its busincsH may be defined as of the merchants, by the 
merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort Is spared, and no 
reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an authority on all matters affecting 
commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It furnishes 
Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciaiy and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY 



Toronto Office : Cor. Melinda and Jordan Sts. 
Hamilton Office: No. 39 James Street South. 
London Office : No. 365 Richmond Street. 



■Winnipeg Office : No. 398 Main Street. 
Vancouver Office: Cor. Hastings and Hamilton Sta. 
Victoria Office : Board of Trade Building. 



TH0S. C. IKVIKG, Gen.-Mgr., Western Canada, Toronto, Ont. 



PERFECTION 
AUTOMATIC 
REVOLVER. 



NEW Automatic shell extracting, 
" ■» " double action, small frame. 
Weighs 12 oz. Rebounding lock. 32 
caliber. 5 shot. 

Made with shorter barrel for bicycle 
use. 

The most perfect small pistol made. 




Forehand 
Arms Co. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



Manufacturers of 
the 

Forehand Guns 

Worcester, 
Mass. 



THE . 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i in^ 



A i I I I I 



jh+h ; 



Waggoner 
Extension Ladder. 

The strongest, lightest and most convenient ladder in the market. The only really satisfactory extension ladder 
made. Pulls up with a rope. Made in all lengths. Also extension and other step ladders, sawhorses, ironing 
boards, painters' trestles, etc. All first-class goods. Write for quotations to 

The Waggoner Ladder Company, Limited, London, Ont. 

ROUND RE-ACTING ji*^ 
WASHER V 



Quickest selling Washing Machine on the 

market. 
None more satisfactory to dealers or users. 
Every home requires a good Washing 

Machine. 
Every Merchant should handle them. 
Prices and full particulars on application. 



THE 



Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Son, 
Montreal, Que. 




^•^♦♦♦♦♦^VfcW^W^V^^^'MkVt^^ 



!! 



\ &>U 1888 




Inc. 1895 



BlackDiamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




I 



:: 

I' 

:: 

!! 

(' 

(' 
i! 

Awarded 

By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

<> 



i 



THERE ARE A DOZEN DIFFERENT KINDS OF 

SOLID RUBBER TIRES 



FOR CARRIAGES. 



>4 



Ninety per cent, of all the 
Rubber Tires in use in New 
York City are trie 

"Kelly- 
Springfield." 

WHY ? 




PATENTED 




Manufactured by 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 

61-63 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO, ONT. 

Factories— 115-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



Ingot Tin, 

"BANCA" 

Ingot Tin, 

"LAMB & FLAG" 

Ingot Copper, 
Zinc Spelter, 
Sheet Zinc, 
Antimony, 
Pig Lead. 

From Stock and to Import. 

Enquiries Solicited. 



B.&S.H. THOMPSON &C0'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 



/wwwwvwwwwwwww 



Galvanized Corrugated sheets 

"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



'WWWWWWVVWWV^%%M\ 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



...Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Gauge and Lubricator Glasses, 
Langwell's Manufacture, 

Montreal 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XII 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO JULY 21, 1900. 



NO. 29 



■TANDEM" AHTl-FRICTION METAL. 



Th° Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
Tne Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



"Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other tor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed, 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH & McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




TIME TELLS 

" QUEEN'S HEAD " has been 
before the Canadian trade for thirty years and has proved its 
claim to be the best and most durable iron on the market. 
Other brands have come and gone, but " QUEEN'S HEAD " 
still leads. 

" FLEUR DE LIS" is second only to "QUEEN'S HEAD." 



JOHN LYSA6HT, 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., 



Limited, 
BRISTOL, ENG , and MONTREAL. 



MONTREAL, 
Managers Canadian Branch. 




OPPORTUNIT Y nW ofe kjttojtks Wice at a man's door— the man 

* vvtpi^alrea on you yesterday for advice as to the best 

Radiato/"^ install in his house gave you the oppor- 

£tui(it/ to make a big advertisement for yourself and 

your store. Did you suggest the " Safford " Radiator 

for Steam or Hot Water Heating? The "Safford" 

y , H ab^elutely cannot leak, you know. 

^JjM Tnis interests you, of course— now, let us send 
4 our illustrated Booklet to you telling all about our 
original invention in screw-threaded nipple connections 
which has made the "Safford" famous all over the world. Some of Canada's 
largest buildings are fitted throughout with the "Safford," and that's an endorse- 
ment of their perfection that we're proud of. Twenty-five different styles plain 

or ornamental — to fit circles, curves, angles. Here's your " opportunity " will you 

take advantage of it ? 

The 




The Dominion Radiator Company, Limited, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Safford 
Radiators. 



Fishing Tackle 



MH I MM I M 



TROLLING LINES 
RODS and REELS 
BAIT PAILS 
HOOKS 
LANDING NETS 
DISGORGERS, Etc. 



Sporting Goods 



************ 



BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

GOLFING 

TENNIS 

CRICKET 

QUOITS 



S 
U 

P 
P 

L 
I 

E 
S 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Sts., 



INI 



^3mn?mwwwmmmmwmwwwmmwmw?mw!nfnwmnTwmwnFmfnmmmmmmwm!!F2: 









THE 



Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 



OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 



£ 
£ 
£ 






Manufacturers of 



Bar Iron and Steel 
Nails, Spikes 
Horse Shoes . . 
Bolts, Washers, etc. 



\ 



3 



3 
3 



Belleville, 
Ontario. I 



^luy^iiuiuiM^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



REGISTERED 



TRADE MARK 



MOORE BROS. 

LIMITED. 

BRASS and IRON 

FOUNDERS 

Birmingham, England. 

8203 C ^„ 45 V=3 

£Dn -p A 




8349 




TL* ' I 8327 



B33S 8332 

342 X 8269 





L'Jjj 1201 




8395 



8422 3245 



The original and sole manufacturers of the M.B. patent 
finished electro-brassed goods. Note the "Beehive" trade 
mark, and beware of imitations. 

All goods put up in cardboard boxes. 

Samples or illustrated lists free on application. 



THRESHING 
BELTS 




5<a 







with these brands 
insure the best 
of wear for the 
money. 



The Canadian Rubber 
Co. of Montreal, 




p»H 




MONTREAL, ^VW*<?S^ 
TORONTO, ^ X <V^ 
WINNIPEG. ^&v«<mk9 .S^ 



SOME OF THE HEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




wt vii-mn 



NO. 41 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN HANDLE. 




VANKEE 
AUTOMATIC DRILL N94I | g^gl 




NO. 42 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN BOX. 



~« 




NO. 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, FOR WOOD OR METALS- 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you experience difficulty with other twine, 

try "Plymouth." 



TRADE 




MARK 



"THE STAMP OF EXCELLENCE." 



HARVEST TIME. 



We can fill repeat orders with great promptness, as we have Binder 
Twine stocks at London, Toronto and Ottawa. 

Order as you sell, every day, and telegraph ( & %2nL) when in a hurry. 



?H tributors: PLYMOUTH BINDER TWINE AGENCY, "Pronto 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



£L & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



We carry in stock a full line of the following goods 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 

Copperine and Babbitt. 

Cotton Waste. 

Crucibles. 

Eave Trough— Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 

Glue — English and French. 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 

Galvanized, "Gordon" Crown and "Apollo," 

Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 
Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 
Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 
Lead Pipe. 

Solder— Half and Half and Standard. 
Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 
Tin Plates— Charcoal and Coke. 
Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, "L. & F." and Straits. 
Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 
Zinc — Sheets and Block. 

PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



I ft* 



«- < nivvhlYI I01N. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ICE CREAM FREEZERS 

The Latest 
and Best. 

The 
Ideal" 



s< 



will make cream in two 
to five minutes, accord- 
ing to quantity. 

SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 
VERY RAPID 
ECONOMICAL 



Write for Circular and 
Prices. 




Wood, Vallance & Co., myi 



Branch House : George D. Wood & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto Office : 88 York Street— H. T. Eager. 




WOOD, VALLANCE 4 CO., 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



GEO. D. WOOD & CO., 

Iron Merchants 

Importers of British and Foreign 

ARDWARE. 

WINNIPEG, Canada. 



CORDAGE . . 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



— • 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 



Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables and 



Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Frsh Cord 
Sand Lines 



"FIRMUS" 
Orders will 



Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila hemp obtainable, 
not be accepted for second quality or "mixed" goods. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



ToronU Branch 37 FBONT 8T. WEST. 
TIL. 94. Wm. B. Stewart, Agent. 



Montreal, Que 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE SUCCESS of our 

MPERIAL QXFOR 



INI 



ever since we put it on the market, has been enormous 

Its splendid construction and new patented features 
give it precedence over all others. 

THE FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

And other improvements need only to be seen to 
be appreciated by your customers. 

If you haven't them in stock, better write for full 
information and price list. 

There's steady demand for them all over Canada. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO,, Limited 




Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 

The Gurney=Massey Co., Limited, Montreal. 



The Auer Gasoline 
Lamp 



100 Candle-Power 

T 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 
or Money Refunded 

Approved by 

Can. Fire Underwriters' 
Association 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



No. 8. Price $8 00 



5 STYLES. 



Auer Light 

Company 

MONTREAL 




. . . Defiance 

Cold 

Blast 

Lantern 



With Patent Fluted 
Plate, by which the air is 
admitted so as to come in 
contact with the Globe, so 
tending to keep it cool. , 

Sold by Leading 
Jobbers. 



Manufactured by. 



W. W. CHOWN & CO. 

Belleville, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 




Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING AT 

O.S Patent Jan. 16, '98, Canadian Patent July 22, '8V 




.i \ svs are faced with steel K Inch wide, 4 inches long. 

linniv fastened to Jaw, checked and hardened. 
VI&E weighs 88 pounds. DRILL weighs 18 pounds. 

For sale by Johhera of Hardware. 
Made by— 

The Adams Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
Made by A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, Ont. 




Hardwood CHARCOAL 



in Bulk or Sacks. 



WUUU MLUUnUL equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 

Manufactured only by.. 

THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., ltait ea 



Fenelon Falls. 



Factories! l e "l[° D J' 
[ Deseronto 



Gooderham Building, TORONTO 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 



"MAXWELL FAVORITE CHURN" 

PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand. 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive. 

i awn winWrirc s-^"*- 

LH If II IYIU II LI Id. widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Cruci- 
ble Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 



In Four different sizes 



Steel Frame Churn 



If your Wholesale House 
offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT 




MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



Wood Frame Churn. 

MAXWELL" Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW TO SAVE GAS Peebles' Automatic Gas Governors 







■Bum 

Gas, Fire and Stove Governor. House Governor Burner. Governor for Incandesconts. Mercurial Governor for Fixing at Meter. 

Sole Manufacturers, D. BRUCE PEEBLES & CO., Tay Works, Edinburgh, Scotland. 



AC; 



°>J 



?X2MESH 

WullenS 

Poultry NettinQ 

^ Galvani 

N9I9STE :L 
WIR 



McMULLEN'S 

POULTRY NETTINGS and LAWNFENCINGS are not 



surpassed in the world. 

Their WOVEN WIRE FENCINGS have stood years of successful 
testing ; special offers are now made on HOG FENCINGS. 

All of the above goods are manufactured by THE ONTARIO WIRE 
FENCING CO., Limited, of Picton, Ont., and are sold by 

OF HAMILTON and 

MONTREAL. 

Limited. 
GENERAL AGENT8 ; ALSO BY THE CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



The B. Greening Wire Co., 



Agent tor Railway Fencing : 



MR. JAMES COOPER, Montreal. 



THE SPRING TRADE 



***** 




To secure thoroughly reliable goods send 
your orders for 

Ready-Mixed House and Floor Paints, 
Varnishes, Japans, Coach Colors, 
White Lead, Colored Paints, Enamels, 
Wood Stains, Wall Tints, Putty, etc. 



to Henderson & Potts, 



NOVA SCOTIA PAINT AND 

VARNISH WORKS, 



HALIFAX, and 747 Craig St., MONTREAL. 



*22& m Brandram's Celebrated White Lead! 




Vol. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 21, 1800. 



No. 29 



President, 

|OHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.B. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

omens 
MONTREAL - - - - Board of Trade Building, 

Telephone 1155. 

TORONTO »6 Front Street West, 

Telephone 2118. 
LONDON, ENO. .... 109 Fleet Street, EX., 

J. M. McKim. 
MANCHESTER, ENG. - - - 18 St Ann Street, 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N. B. - - . No. 3 Market Wharf. 

I. Hunter White. 

NEW YORK. 150 Nassau Street, 

Edwin H. Haven. 

Travelling Subscription Agents : 
T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 

Subscription Canada, $2.00 Great Britain, (3.00 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address I Adscript, London 
1 Adscript, Canada. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIRADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



BRASS SIGNS. 

ONE who visits the wholesale sections 
of our larger cities, or who observes 
the external appearance of our 
leading retail stores, cannot fail to notice 
that the brass sign is coming into general 
use in the more important centres of busi- 
ness. As yet, its popularity has not spread 
to the smaller towns, but it would be unsafe 
- • predict that the smaller merchants wi 1 
not soon see the benefit of decorating their 
places of business with it. 

For appearance, nothing equals It. 
Painted signs cannot present such a solid 
and dignified appearance, even when the 
painter has just turned his back and the 
sign "wet paint" still hangs about to 
prevent familiarity from breeding contempt. 



After three months' wear, painted signs are 
shabby. The rain, the heat and the cold 
make them crack and fade, and in three 
years the words are scarcely legible. One 
who cares at all about the appearance of 
his store constantly renovates the signs 
which are generally found below his plate 
glass windows. It is absolutely necessary 
to do so to have presentable windows, for 
it is impossible to make windows attractive, 
no matter how well-dressed they may be, if 
the woodwork about them is shabby. 

The brass sign, on the other hand, will 
last a lifetime and will maintain its appear- 
ance till it is worn out. 

The small storekeeper may hold up his 
hands in horror at the cost. But has he 
compared the cost of the brass sign with 
that of the painted and gilted sign ? In 99 
cases out of 100 we venture to say he has 
not. We feel sure of this, else there would 
be more of them in use. Two ordinary 
brass signs, lettered similarly and equal in 
size to those that are generally placed below 
retail store windows, cost from $20 to $22, 
and last a lifetime ! Compare this with the 
primary and renovating cost of painted 
signs : Will any intelligent business man 
say then that these brass signs are not to be 
preferred ? He must have signs of some 
sort, and he may as well have a dignified 
as a poor and unbusinesslike appearance 
for his store front. 

In regard to the cleaning and polishing, 
we venture to say that the amount of time 
usually given to the dusting of painted signs 
will keep the brass signs in first-class shape. 
Hardware merchants in towns throughout 
the Dominion might secure agencies for 
these goods. There ought to be no difficulty 
in introducing them. Of course, the letter- 
ing has to be done by machinery or experts. 



BUSINESS IN BINDER TWINE. 

THE condition of the binder twine 
market is not as satisfactory as manu- 
factuiers and dealers would like. 
In the first place, the volume is small. 
In Ontario, a great deal of binder twine 
will be used, for the wheat crop there is fair, 
while the yield of oats will be large. But 
even trade on the account of that Province 
is light. As far as Manitoba is concerned, 
a large business with that Province is not to 
be expected. Reports from the Northwest 
Territories this week, however, give promise 
of a good harvest. 

It is the general opinion that later on an 
improved demand will be experienced for 
binder twine. In the meantime, however, 
business is unquestionably quiet, and. to 
make matters worse, there is a good deal of 
last season's twine on the market which 
holders are selling, although at a profit, at 
lower prices than those now ruling for this 
season' s make. 

The hemp market, both sisal and manila, 
rule weak with business dull. 



Now that the price has decreased, whole- 
salers and manufacturers are looking for an 
increase in the movement of wire nails. 



FURTHER REDUCTIONS. 

Since we last went to press the manufac- 
turers have made further changes in the 
price of certain lines of wire and wire 
goods. 

The discount on fine steel wire, which 
was 12 <4 per cent, is now 15 per cent. On 
flour barrel nails the discount is 25 per 
cent., instead of 20. The price of staples 
has also been reduced, bright now being 
quoted at $3.45 per keg, while the discount 
on coopers' staples is 45 per cent. , and on 
poultry netting staples 40 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL RAILS AND RAILWAY SUBSIDIES. 



HON. MR. BLAIR, the Minister of 
Railways, made an important state- 
ment in the House a few days ago 
in regard to the policy of the Government 
towards railway subsidies. 

He declared it was the intention of the 
Government to insert in all future contracts 
for railway subsidies a clause to the effect 
that the steel rails on the roads should be 
made in Canada, if they were procurable in 
Canada upon terms as favorable as else- 
where, the Minister of Railways to be the 
judge. 

A strong public opinion is developing in 
this country against a continuance of the 
old and liberal method of granting railway 
subsidies. It is estimated that this country 
has spent about $198,000,000 in railway 
subsidies, besides giving some 40,000,000 
acres of land. And it is in the face of these 
facts, evidently time that we began to con- 
sider whether or not we have been o'er- 
liberal. 

There are, undoubtedly, some districts 
in the newer parts of the Dominion where 
it will not only be necessary to build rail- 
ways, but which will require assistance in 
the way of Government subsidies. There 
should, however, be some provision that, at 
some time and in some way, the principal 
at least, should be returned to the Govern- 
ment treasury. 

When a man borrows money with which 
to go into business he expects his venture 
will be profitable, and that he will be able 
to pay the principal as well as the interest. 
If those promoting a railway and seeking 
a subsidy therefor would not be willing to 
return the principal it is evident they would 
not have much confidence in the financial 
success of their venture. A capitalist 
would not advance money under such cir- 
cumstances ; neither should a Government. 

The proposal of the Government to com- 
pel subsidized railways to buy their steel 
rails in Canada is evidently an effort to 
secure for the country some return for the 
subsidy given. At present, however, no 
steel rails are made in Canada. With the 
steel works which are now in course of 
erection, however, it is only a question of time 
before they will be. But, in the meantime, 
such a clause in the subsidy contracts will 



A' 



be of no value. And, anyhow, if rails 
were made in Canada is it likely the rail- 
way companies would go outside the 
country for rails if they could secure them 
therein "upon terms as favorable as else- 
where ? " 

To be candid, we do not think the pro- 
position has much value, even were rails 
made in Canada, although we do not ques- 
tion the intention of the Government. 

The Ontario Government has a provision 
in its contracts for railway subsidies, where- 
by the latter may be given in money or in 
material. When Canada has a steel rail 
mill it seems to us that some such scheme as 
that would be more helpful to the steel rail 
workers than that outlined by the Minister 
of Railways. 

CANADIAN-DENMARK TRADE. 
MOST interesting little book, dealing 
with Copenhagen and its free port, 
has been handed to Hardware and 
Metal by Mr. N. Visholm, who for some 
months has been in Canada endeavoring to 
interest Canadians in the free port of the 
Danish capital and its trade. 

The book is nicely written and liberally 
illustrated, but its chief interest lies in the 
commercial matters with which it deals. 

Copenhagen has been termed the central 
mart of the Baltic. And a glance at the 
map of Europe will convince one that as far 
as situation is concerned the term is not 
misapplied, while the trade statistics which 
the book contains make it clear that it is a 
decidedly important trade distributing 
centre. 

For some centuries Copenhagen has 
ranked among the important ports of 
Europe, but several years ago it was felt 
that the harbor needed improving and 
expanding. Eventually the idea of making 
it a free port was taken up by several 
influential men. By 1880 it was a national 
question, and a commission was appointed 
to consider the project. The outcome of 
the commission was a decision to construct 
a new and a free harbor. In 1891 what is 
known as the free port bill passed through 
Parliament, and it wa^ decided that the new 
harbor should be an integral part of the old 
Copenhagen harbor, under the control of 
the Minister of the Interior. A company 



with a capital of #1,000,000 was formed to 
carry out the project. Construction work 
began in 1891, and 3^ years lateirVas 
finished. 

In constructing the harbor, 148 acres of 
land were reclaimed from the sea, and the 
harbor consists of four large basins, or 
docks, with quays over two miles in length. 

The harbor is now free from all the in- 
convenience attending the payment of 
Customs on goods entering the port. "In 
addition," to quote from the book, "it is 
almost entirely free from the usual dues and 
fees which weigh so heavily on shipping 
elsewhere, as ships entering the free port 
are expected to pay only a nominal pierage 
due, thus making the Copenhagen port one 
of the cheapest in the world." 

One of the important features about 
Copenhagen is that it is a centre into which 
merchandise is brought in large quantities 
for reexport to Russia, Germany, Norway, 
Sweden, etc., and from these countries for 
reexport to other nations. In 1893, £44,- 
961,000 worth of merchandise were im- 
ported from Russia, and .£61,373000 
exported ; £11,365,000 imported from Nor- 
way, and £7,560,000 exported ; £18,423,- 
000 imported from Sweden, and £18,204,- 
000 exported ; £199,185,000 imported 
from Germany, and £154,650,000 exported. 
The exports on Denmark account were 
^13,062,000, and imports £17,794,000. 

Canada's trade with Denmark is at 
present small, the aggregate — imports and 
exports — in 1899 being only $56,720. The 
value of the imports are $2,329 and of the 
exports $54,391. Our exports to Denmark 
last year were much in excess of any pre- 
vious year. For example, in 1898 their 
value was $21,296 ; in 1897, $28,757 ; in 
1896, $42,894, and in 1895, $16,445. 

Our exports were principally made up as 
follows : 

Carriages $ 2370 

Lobsters, canned 23781 

Agricultural implements 571 5 

Seeds, c'over ... 20.765 

Wood, manufacture* of 1,117 

AN INEXCUSABLE BLUNDER. 

One would imagine that those who had 
the preparation of the official agenda paper 
for the recent Congress of the Chambers of 
Commerce of the Empire in London would 
at least have been conversant with the 
geography of the Empire, or would at least 
have recharged their memory. It is evident 
that something was needed, for Kaslo, 
British Columbia, is put down as being in 
Ontario, while Cape Breton is credited with 
being in British Columbia. Such blunders 
are inexcusable. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



9 



A PREPOSTEROUS PROPOSITION. 



C CERTAIN members of Parliament 
have discovered that the sessional 
indemnity of $ i ,ooo is not sufficient. 
The present session has lasted about five 
months and a half, and there has been a 
clamor for an extra $500. This would 
mean an addition of over $100,000 to the 
cost of the session. 

The Good Book tells us " the laborer is 
worthy of his hire," and, of course, no 
intelligent Canadian would for one moment 
deny proper compensation to his repre- 
sentative in the House of Commons. It is 
worth no small sum to have a representative 
who will make long speeches for you, fight 
for you, use language unparliamentary for 
you, and sit up until dawn of day wrangling 
for you. A man who will do all these 
things for you is worth money. He has 
staying powers which are not picked up at 
every street corner. 

But, after all, would it not be better if the 
affairs of Parliament were conducted on the 
same principles that a man conducts his 
business on if he hopes to be successful ? 
We may run the risk of differing with the 
average member of Parliament in this 
particular, but, in spile of that, we believe 
it would. 

Of course we fully realize that if we are 
going to contend for a Parliament on 
business lines, we must be prepared to 
amend our statement to the effect that the 
average present member of Parliament is 
worth a great deal and declare that he is 
not worth very much, but we are quite 
prepared to do so. A newspaper that is not 
prepared to change its opinion, even in the 
course of one article, does not amount to 
much. It is always best to change an 
opinion when it is for the best ; and we are 
convinced, that is, on this occasion, for the 
best. 

A business man when engaging his heads 
_ of departments and minor employes would 
stipulate, at any rate by implication, that 
they should faithfully attend to the several 
duties to which they were allotted. If, 
instead of attending to business, however, 
they spent the most of their time bullying 
each other, threatening each other and 
impugning the loyalty of each other toward 
their employer, they would certainly be 



dismissed. One cannot conceive that a 
business man would do anything else. 
And as far as demanding an increase in 
salary because of the long hours they had 
put in at the warehouse, it would be pre- 
posterous to think it would be ever granted. 

Employers pay their employes for the 
time they work, not for the time they spend 
in quarrelling, yet, what business men do 
not the people of this country are asked to 
do for their representatives in Parliament. 
Such a request is preposterous, and is no 
more worthy of consideration than if 
advanced by the employes of a business 
house. 

We believe we are estimating on the low 
side when we say that the members of 
Parliament have, during the present session, 
spent fully one-third of their time in sense- 
less wrangling or in making speeches whose 
sole and only object was the making of 
political capital. And, in doing this, they 
have not only wasted their own time, but 
they have wasted the substance of the 
country, and now they have the impudence 
to ask for more pay. It would be more 
seemly for them to suggest a reduction. 
But they are not magnanimous enough for 
that, while we are too magnanimous to 
demand it. An increase in the indemnity 
is, however, out of all reason. 



THE PRICE OF STOVES IN CANADA. 

SOME of those engaged in the stove 
trade have lately been of the opinion 
that a decline, in view of the lower 
price of pig iron, was not improbable in the 
near future. 

Those who are that way of thinking are 
not likely to have their expectations realized 
— at least for some time. 

A meeting of stove manufacturers was 
held a few days ago in Gananoque to con- 
sider, among others, this very question. 
But there was no disposition to change 
prices. While pig iron is lower, the sup- 
plies for some time ahead have been bought 
at the higher figures, and then last year the 
manufacturers did not advance their prices 
correspondingly with the appreciation in 
raw material. 

Then, although pig iron is lower, there 
has been no decrease in the cost of other 



kinds of material, and labor starv' 

before. In Montreal only this week there 

has been a material advance in moulders 

wages. 

t 
From what Hardware and Metal can 

gather, it is improbable that there will be 

any reduction in the price of stoves this 

year at any rate. 



A BOOM IN PIG TIN VALUES. 

THE pig tin market has been an un- 
usually interesting one during the last 
10 days. There has been quite a 
boom in prices in both New York and 
London. 

Prices began their upward tendency early 
last week, and, although the middle of the 
present week saw a reaction, the net result 
is quite an appreciation in values. 

Two weeks ago spot tin closed at ,£139 
10s. in London and at ,£133 10s. for futures. 
In New York spot tin was held at 31.50c. 

By Tuesday of this week spot tin had 
touched ^145 in London and futures .£138 
10s. Here was an advance in about 10 
days of £$ in futures and of £$ 10s. in spot 
tin. In New York, on the same day, spot 
tin sold at 34.10c. per lb., or 2.60c. per lb. 
higher than the figures quoted 10 days be- 
fore. 

On Wednesday the reaction came. Cables 
received at midday announced a decline in 
London of 10s. in spot tin and of £1 15s. in 
futures. Further breaks during the day 
brought spot tin down to £143. New York 
turned weaker in sympathy, and, while 
sellers asked 34.25c. for 5-ton lots, buyers' 
orders would not go beyond 34 05c. per lb. 
On Thursday there was a slight improve- 
ment. In London, part of the previous day's 
decline was made up ; but, although the 
market closed at .£143 10s., a gain of 10s. 
over the previous day, the feeling was easy. 
In New York, 34c. was asked and 34.50c. 
bid, and in that market the feeling was firm 
in regard to spot tin but weak in regard to 
futures. 

The strength which the market has de- 
veloped is attributed to the fact that the 
stock in New York was nearly all concen- 
trated in one house, whi'e the visible supply 
of pig tin at the end of last month was 
3,575 tons less than at the same time in 
1899, an( * 8,323 tons less than in 1898. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADING STAMPS IN VICTORIA. 

A MEETING of retail merchants was 
held in Victoria, B.C., on July n. 
Among those present were : J. 
H. Getschman, Thomas Redding, H. Firth, 
Aaron Garland, John McSweeny, F. E. 
Plummer, John Leonard, Watson & Hall, 
Shroeder Bios., M. J. Thompson, H. C. 
Lester, J. T. McDonald, W. A. Jameson, 
Hardress Clarke, Jas. Renouf, Fred Came, 
jr., T. E. B. Jones, John Speed, of Speed 
Bros., William Wilby, L. Goodacre, E. P. 
Chapman, W. J. Pendray, David Spencer, 
sr., David Spencer, jr., G. A. Richardson, 
W. Bickford, A. N. Rahy, H. Mansell, W. 
Bowness, J. J. Shallcross, C. H. Lugrin, D. 
R. Ker and others. 

W. A. Ward, president of the Board of 
Trade, occupied the chair, and A. Gilson 
acted as secretary. The chairman briefly 
outlined the object of the meeting and 
asked Mr. Came to take the initiative in 
bringing matters to a business basis. 

Mr. Carne explained that the grocers of 
Victoria had held a meeting, and as they, 
with the other retail merchants of the city, 
were heartily tired of the trading stamps, 
they asked the cooperation of the board of 
trade in an effort to stamp out the evil. 

President Ward read a letter from A. C. 
McGregor, who was unavoidably absent 
from the city. Mr. McGregor expressed 
approval of the movement to do away with 
the system. 

Mr. Carne thought they should do away 
with the stamps, coupons and premiums of 
all kinds. 

W. Williams, of B. Williams & Co., 
thought that efforts should be confined to 
doing away with trading stamps ; that would 
be sufficient. 

Aid. Cameron thought this opened an 
important point for discussion. In his 
opinion they should do away with all 
premiums. 

A. G. Bandless thought that the doing 
away with trading stamps would be sufficient. 
There might be occasions when business 
firms might consider it necessary or advan- 
tageous to give something in the nature of a 
cash discount or premium. He was much 
opposed to the trading stamps, however ; 
it was in his opinion a big mistake that the 
system should be in operation, and it would 
be found that the merchants would get along 
all right without them after they were gone. 

Mr. Williams again expressed the opinion 
that all that it was necessary to do was to 
do away with the trading stamps. 

Mr. Carne believed that the trading stamp 
system was inaugurated owing to the fact 
that merchants had been giving away 
coupons and premiums. 

After some further discussion, the follow- 



ing resolution was carried, only three of 

those present voting against it : 

We, the undersigned retail merchants of the city 
of Victoria, B.C. .hereby pledge ourselves that on 
and after August I, 1900, we will not offer trading 
stamps as an inducement for business, or premium 
gifts or coupons for drawings or lotteries, or give 
any consideration for the purpose of inducing cus- 
tomers to deal with us, other than the articles bona 
fide to be sold or to be offered for sale. 

The following committee was then ap- 
pointed to obtain signatures and carry out 
the details for the discontinuance of the 
stamps and other evils in the retail trade, 
with power to add to their number : 

Grocers — A. Gilson, W. A. Jameson, 
J. H. Todd and D. R. Ker ; dry goods— 
Westcott and Richardson ; boots and shoes 
— Patterson and Mansell ; clothing and 
men's furnishings — W. G. Cameron and 
Wilson ; hardware — Shore and Bowness ; 
butchers — Gus Porter ; confectioners — 
Lilley and James Brenchley, manager for 
J. R. Steward & Co. 

There was some further discussion of an 
unimportant character, and the meeting 
adjourned, Aid. Cameron moving a vote of 
thanks to the board of trade for kindness in 
arranging the conference. 



TILBURY BUSINESS MEN. 

MR. W. C. Crawford, general, or you 
might say departmental store, for 
you could scarcely conceive of any 
article he does not carry in his monster new 
premises in Tilbury, which for modern con- 
venience could hardly be improved on. Mr. 
Crawford is a hustler, and has the tact to do 
everything in systematic order, and although 
kept so busy in superintending so large a 
business, has always time to see all callers, 
'and dispose of them in a way which makes 
them feel they would like to call again. 
Judging from the fine premises and active 
business carried on there, the Tilbury 
merchants must be prospering. 

Since I last visited Tilbury, Mr. J. S. 
Richardson, general merchant, has moved 
into his large new brick premises, 40 x 155 
ft.; with plate glass front, 14 x 37 ft. This 
is one of the finest stores I have seen. 
There is not a single pillar to obstruct the 
view over the whole floor, the ceilings being 
supported by steel girders. On the first 
floor, dry goods, boots, shoes, hats, caps, 
and ready-made clothing are tastily arranged, 
while, at the back, the grocery department is 
located. On the south side is a fine suite of 
offices of fine workmanship, finished in ash. 
The second floor is devoted to the millinery, 
carpet and housefurnishing lines. The 
building is heated throughout by steam, 
lighted by electricity, and cash carriers 
traverse the whole store. 

Mr. Richardson is an active businessman, 
and courteous to everyone, He reports 
business good, 



CANADIAN WALL PAPER AT PARIS. 

PDARTIGUENAVE, the leading New 
York designer, has written a letter 
• to a New York wall paper journal 
as follows relative to his observations at the 
Paris Exposition • 

Paris, June 20, 1900. 

In my last letter I told you I would write 
to you again about what I might find inter- 
esting in the wall paper exhibits of the Paris « 
Exposition. The other day I was visiting 
the English Colonies, when I was agreeably 
surprised to see a beautiful display made by 
The Watson, Foster Co. in the section of 
Canada. They have a very large and 
splendid showcase where one can see a 
selection of the best samples of their line. I 
was not the only one to be attracted by their 
showing, for a whole crowd were standing 
around, admiring the richness of the color- 
ings and the grace of the drawings. One of 
the company's best and most attractive 
samples is a large parlor paper in half- 
tapestry shades and with a heavy gold 
background. I have hardly ever seen any- 
thing of a more striking and artistic effect. 
I will not try to depict to you all the good 
things I have seen in their exhibit. A design 
is something that must be looked at ; a 
description of it is hardly interesting. Still, 
I will tell you that their assortment is com- 
plete. Florals, heraldics, halls, scrolls, etc., 
are in great variety. Besides their central 
display, they have a number of panels, 
spread a little all over the rooms of the 
Canadian section. 

I have also noticed in the section of the 
United States two beautiful rooms decorated 
with papers of Wm. Campbell & Co. You 
have already given their complete descrip- 
tion in your weekly paper, so I need only 
tell you that they are of great taste and 
attract a great deal of attention. 

Do I need to tell you that the exhibition 
here is now in full bloom ? Paris is no 
more the capital of France, but seems to be 
in the hands of strangers, for one can hear 
all languages spoken here. Americans, 
especially, are in great numbers. They 
will find here all they want that is interest- 
ing, for the American exhibit alone is of 
great importance, and it would take several 
months to study it thoroughly. 

Yours, most sincerely, 

P. Dartiguenave, 
31 Avenue de la Republique, 

Nanterre, near Paris, France. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 



Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



PREJUDICES AGAINST INSURANCE. 

' • There is the great prejudice that one can 
handle his own money better than the com- 
pany, and therefore he will not assure his 
life, and this goes hand-in hand with the 
conviction of the noncapitalist that he can- 
not afford it. But it is a happy thing, ' ' says 
James W. Alexander in The Atlantic, "that 
these prejudices are gradually breaking 
> down, but the people still treat life assurance 
as a luxury. They pay in their premiums 
in good times, and drop them or refrain 
from taking the first step in bad times. The 
reverse of this would be rational. Instances 
of bitter disappointment to families are 
occurring all the time, upon the death of 
the bread winner leaving nothing but debts. 
In former times life insurance was sparingly 
resorted to, and almost exclusively by 
salaried men and by men of small affairs. 
Later, the prosperous and the capitalistic 
class learned that ' an anchor to windward ' 
in the shape of life assurance is an ad- 
vantage. 

" Many is the successful merchant who 
has left one or more hundreds of thousands of 
assurance which has saved the integrity of 
his business or has bridged over the gaps 
while the estate was being disentangled. 
Partnerships have been saved from wreck 
by the interassurance of the members. 
Families enjoying luxury have through the 
medium of large life assurance escaped 
being suddenly plunged into the misery of 
dependency. The man who is confident 
that he can handle his own money best 
without committing it to a company ignores 
the uncertainty of life. Even if he has the 
requisite knowledge, skill and steadfastness 
to do as well as the company throughout a 
lifetime of 60 years, how can he be sure he 
will not die ? Premature death wrecks all 
his plans. The assured man establishes a 
capital for those he is to leave behind the 
moment he assures." 



SETTLERS FOR CANADA. 

Another large batch of emigrants are 
shortly expected in this country from Ice- 
land, on their way to Winnipeg. 

This Icelandic emigration to Canada is a 
very curious thing, says The Manchester 
Guardian. Since the stoppage of live stock 
exports to the United Kingdom the Iceland- 
ers have been hardly put to it to make a 
living. They used to send their lean sheep 
to the North of England and to Scotland, 
where the animals were put out to fatten 
and then sold. Now this has stopped, the 
Icelanders have only fishing to fall back 
upon as a means of livelihood, which is not 
much for a population of 80,000 souls. 

They are, therefore, emigrating to Can- 
ada. Over 1,000 of them have left within 
the last few months, and they have all 




EVERY 
DROP 

of The Sherwin-Williams Paint is up to the 
highest standard of paint requirements. 
Every step of the manufacture is so carefully 
watched that not a drop of the paint can leave us 
without being absolutely right. Materials all chemi- 
cally and practically tested. Grinding and mixing 
under expert supervision. Filling of cans by weight 
as a check on consistency. Accuracy and the best 
work all along the line. When the packages are 
sealed we know beyond all possibility of doubt that 
S.-W. P. is right, that it will give the best possible 
paint satisfaction. 

You can have the same confidence, and by push- 
ing the'goods with such faith as that in them, you 
can't fail to build big business. 

Every drop of S.-W. P. you sell will help bring in 
the orders. 

tf% The Sherwin-Williams Co 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO. 



NEW YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 




settled in the neighborhood of Winnipeg. 
The colony they have formed is called 
"Young Iceland." May it prosper ! — 
Canadian Gazette, London, Eng. 



DAFT, BUT LOYAL WITHAL. 

The Oil and Drug Review, of Chicago, 
Illinois, says : "The English and Canuck 
have gone ' daft ' on the color question — 
it is khaki uniforms for the soldiers, dresses 
for the ladies, etc. A Canadian manufac- 
turing concern is now turning out a ' khaki' 
mixed paint." 



trade stores, and another, an annex to the 
present large buildings, will be erected for 
casting purposes. The machinery is cap- 
able of performing all requirements of the 
heaviest lines of trade, and will do any 
work likely to arise on the Pacific Coast for 
some time. 



BENNETT'S HARDWARE BOXES. 

The Bennett hardware shelf boxes are 
gradually getting into general use. Mr. J S. 
Bennett is now at work in his factory at 
20 Sheridan avenue, Toronto, on these 
boxes for the equipment of the hardware 
department in the Winnipeg store of The 
Hudson's Bay Company. 



A HARDWAREMAN ABROAD. 

Mr. Wilbur Gordon, hardware merchant, 
Tweed, Ont., sails from Montreal on the ss. 
Lake Superior for a trip abroad. During his 
absence he will visit Liverpool, London, 
Belfast, Dublin and Paris. Mr. Gordon 
has spent the last seven years devoted to 
the establishing of his now large and flour- 
ishing business. During that time he has 
only taken two weeks' holidays, which he 
spent in Winnipeg. He expects to return 
about August 25. 



A LARGE ESTABLISHMENT. 

The Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C., 
will soon be completed, and will in a month 
or so give employment to 150 men. The 
works are divided into four departments, a 
boiler shop, a machine shop, a third for 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC 

A CATALOGUE IN SPANISH. 

The Iver-Johnson Arms & Cycle Works 
have issued another edition of their cata- 
logue, printed this time in Spanish. The 
catalogue is a handsoi. e one and very 
complete, containing, besides the Spanish 
text, numerous cuts of their revolvers, etc. 
This edition is for circulation in the South- 
American countries and other places where 
the Spanish language is used. The busi- 
ness done by The Iver-Johnson Works with 
the South-American republics is a large and 
growing one, and necessitates the printing 
of a separate edition of the catalogue. Thi? 
should be very much appreciated by S 
speaking people, and is another example of 
the enterprise of this firm, whose motto, 
" Honest goods at honest prices, no doubt 
is the great reason for their success, 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

CHATTEL mortgagees are in posses- 
sion of The Greenwood Hardware 
and Stove Co., Greenwood, B.C. 

J. A. W. David, hardware merchant, 
Montreal, has assigned to Alex. Des- 
marteau. 

A meeting of the creditors of Hiram 
Hyde, coal dealer, Truro, N.S., is called 
for July 20. 

John C. McMillan, general merchant, 
Webbwood, Ont., has assigned to Richard 
Lee, Toronto. 

S. & J. Carriere, general merchants, 
Coteau Landing, Que., have assigned ; 
creditors meet July 24. 

A meeting to appoint a curator for H. 
Boulay, general merchant, Sayabec, Que., 
was called for July 17. 

E. S. Cressman & Co., general mer- 
chants, Hanover, Ont., have assigned to 
H. H. Miller and C. S. Scott, Hamilton. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Kwong Hang Chong, geneial merchants, 
Vancouver.B.C.have dissolved partnership. 

Wm. Parsons & Son, blacksmiths, Har- 
wich, Ont., have dissolved ; Wm. Parsons, 
jr., continues. 

Organ, Elliot & Co., manufacturers' 
agents, have registered partnership at Mont- 
real. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

James Found, sawmiller, Whitechurch, 
Ont., advertises his business for sale. 

D. H. Winter, hardware merchant, 
Chatham, Ont., has sold out to Theodore 
Bourassa. 

The stock of T. B. Willis, general 
merchant, Markham, Ont., was sold by 
sheriff. 

T. & D. Briggs, general merchants, Fork 
River, Man., have sold out to Thomas 
Whale. 

Carley & Studor, general merchants, 
Morden, Man., have sold out to Joseph P. 
Graves. 

B. J. Smith, general merchant, Reston, 
Man., has sold out to John White, Boisse- 
vain, Man. 

The property of Edgar Scott, general 
merchant, Milford, N.S., is advertised for 
sale by auction. 

The rolling stock and book debts of Ed. 
Barabe, sawmiller, St. Jean des Challions, 
Que., have been sold. 

The stock of the estate of Hemenway & 
Waller, general merchants, Carman, Man., 
was sold at 70c. on the dollar. 

The stock of the estate of Andrew Holi- 
day, general merchant, Boissevain, Man,, 
was sold at 62c. on the dollar, 



CHANGES. 

Wm. Cass, blacksmith, Hartland, N.B., 
has commenced business. 

G. W. Ludlow, hardware and furniture 
dealer, Dry den, Ont., has been succeeded 
by S. B. Schwartzemer. 

McCorquodale & Co., harness dealers, 
Napinka, Man., are out of business. 



Martin, Blanchard & Martin, builders, 
Sydney, N.S., have commenced business. 



•u 



FIRES. 

The premises of Charlebois & Martineau, 
bicycles, sporting goods, etc., Montreal, 
were damaged by fire and water ; insured. 

DEATHS. 

Roger W. Warne, sawmiller, Hillgrove, 
N.S., is dead. 



Major Taylor 

THE CHAMPION OF THE WORLD 
RIDES A 

Red-Headed Iver Johnson Bicycle 

AND WINS. 

Thousands of riders throughout the country ride Iver Johnson 
Bicycles and FIND THEM SATISFACTORY. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



Branches New York 
Boston 
Worcester 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



*•«■ 



Gilbertson's Galvanized Sheets 



-••* 



PATENT 




FLATTENED 



are •aitable for all kinds of Galvanized work demanding uniform quality ; being made 
of superior Siemens Steel, they will double seam either way of grain, are smooth, soft, and 
well galvanized, every sheet being carefully selected ; weight and count of sheets per case 
fully equal to the best known brands imported, and cost less. 

Gilbertson's are the only galvanizers who not only roll all their Steel Sheets, but 
manufacture all their own Steel in their own Steel Works, thus enabling them to put a 
soft and regular quality of steel into their sheets, which is impossible for galvanizers who buy 
their steel in the open market. 
GILBERTSON'S CORRUGATED GALVANIZED SHEETS— all sizes. 

"GILBERTSON'S" SIEMENS-MARTIN TINPLATES 

are soft, extra well coated, noted for deep stamping qualities, and for canners of fruits, meats, 
and fish have no equals. Cost no more than brands not nearly as well coated, or of equal quality. 



BRANDS: 



Gilberton's," "Parsons," " Pontardawe," 

Lincoln," "Comet," "Regina,'' " Gwyned." 



GILBERTSON'S TERNEPLATES. " Regina " brand. 

IMITATION RUSSIA SHEETS— will not crack or scale. Pickled, cold rolled and 

close annealed. 
SIEMENS-MARTIN STEEL SHEETS, close annealed, close annealed and cold 

rolled (flat and free from buckles), also pickled. 
BLACK CEILING PLATES, " Comet " brand. Pickled, cold rolled and close annealed. 
BLACK TAGGER PLATES. Pickled and close annealed. 

Supplies carried by all wholesale jobbers. In ordering please mention brands. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, 



Agent - 



13 St. John Street, MONTREAL. 



-••• 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO, 

wholesale 37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. only LE; 



Harvest Tools 





"i&H 





— i 



Hay Forks 


Garden Hoes 


Hoe Handles 


Straw Forks 


Field Hoes 


Fork Handles 


Barley Forks 


Scythes 


Rake Handles 


Manure Forks 


Snaths 


Barley Fork " 


Potato Forks 


Cradles 


Cradle Fingers 


Potato Drags 


Scythe Stones 


Ferrules 


Vegetable Scoops 


Emery Stones 


Harvest Whips 


Hay Rakes, Reaping 


Hooks, Corn Knives 


and Harvest Mitts 


H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 


, Toronto. 


a pull line. Graham Wire and Got Nails are the Best, prSly 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 20, 1900. 
HARDWARE. 

SINCE the reductions in wire nails, cut 
nails, and smooth steel wire noted last 
week, business has been a little 
brisker. Both jobbers and retailers were 
anticipating some reductions such as these 
and were consequently holding off for lower 
figures. Now, having obtained them, filling 
orders are coming to hand. The demand 
for summer articles, such as sporting goods, 
icecream freezers, etc., is reported to be 
falling off, while the fall •goo %. &tp not 
moving freely. Only the stajjj^articles^ 
such as nails, wire, horseshoes, rivets, etc., 




are moving in fair quantities. Payments 
are good. 

Barbed Wire — Some fair orders have 
been secured, but they are not large. The 
price is unchanged with the base at $3.30 
f.o.b. Montreal in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — There is little doing. 
We quote as follows : Nos. 6, 7, and 8 
guage, $3.91;; No. 9, $3.20 ; No. 10, $4.10 ; 
No. 11, #4.i5;No. 12, #3.35;No. 13, $3.45; 
No. 14, $4.50 ; No. 15, $5 ; and No. 16, 
$5.25, for small quantities. 

Smooth Wire — There is little demand 
for any variety of smooth wire. We quote 

^00 per 100 lb. base. 

WiRE^The d^scourjt is 15 



per cent, off list, ins 



A /NEW 



d of. Ejfc£ as before 



Brass and Copper Wire — Little is doing. 
Discounts are 55 and 2)4 per cent, on 
brass, and 50 and 2 '/£ per cent, on copper. 

Fence Staples — These have been 
reduced 15c. per keg, and are now quoted 
at $3 45 per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — More orders have been 
received this week, some small and some 
large. Prices are unchanged at last week's 
reduction. We quoted $3. 10 for small lots 
and $3 for carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and St. John, 
N.B. 

Cut Nails — Somewhat larger than sort- 
ing orders are coming to hand since the re- 
duction of 25c. a keg. We quote $2.60 
for small and $2.50 for carlots. Flour 





( ROUGH WOOD 

For any kind of Fuel ' KN0TTED W00D 



) HARD COAL 
I SOFT COAL 



Made in three sizes, with capacities 
ranging from io r ooo to 50,000 cubic 
feet. The most modern and power- 
ful heater of its kind made in the 
Dominion. 

They have larger heating surfaces than any other, 
and have . . . 

Heavy sectional firepot, 

Triangular grates, 

Double fire door, size II 15 in; 

Direct or indirect draft. 

Safety gas damper, 

Steel plate dome and radiator. 

They are easily set up, and cased. 

A High-Class Furnace at a Low Price. 



Descriptive matter will be mailed to Agents 
in a few days. 



LONDON, 

TORONTO, 

MONTREAL, 

WINNIPEC, 

or VANCOUVER. 



THE McCLARY MFG. CO 



* - 'iinvfnTIUIN/ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Air ••can Sheet Steel Company 

JBattery Park Building 

New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

W. Deuces Wood Company's 

Planished I: on 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

H. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

-!t> St. SuLpice Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

3 i Wellington ureal, MONTREAL 

Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



Deseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, OAT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



barrel nails, 25 percent, discount ; coopers' 
nails, 30 per cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — Trade is quiet. The 
discount is 50 per cent, on Standard and 50 
and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Horseshoes are active 
at the decline. We quote as follows : 
Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.65 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, $3.90 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4. 15; 
X L steel shoes all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.85 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4. 10 ; 
feather-weight, all sizes, $5.10; toe weight 
steel shoes, all sizes, $6.20 f.o.b. Mont- 
real; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and Guelph, 
ioc. extra. 

Screws — The demand is only moderate. 
Discounts are as follows : Flat head bright, 
80 per cent, off list ; round head bright, 75 
per cent. ; flat head brass, 75 percent.; 
round head brass, 67 '4 per cent. ; flat head 
bronze, 67^ percent.; round head bronze, 
62 14 per cent. 

Bolts — The tone is decidedly sluggish. 
Discounts are as follows : Tire bolts, 
60 per cent. ; common carriage bolts, all 
sizes, 50 per cent. ; ditto, full square, 
65 per cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 52 j£ 
per cent. ; coach screws, 65 per cent. ; sleigh- 
shoe bolts, 70 per cent.; blank bolts, 52^ 
per cent. ; bolt ends, 52 y 2 per cent. ; nuts, 
square, 3J£c. per lb. off ; nuts, hexagon, 
4c. off; stove bolts, 6oand 10; plough bolts. 
50 per cent. ; Norway bolts, full, square, 
65 per cent. 

Rivets — The demand for rivets is 
fair. We quote discounts as follows : 
Best iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
50 per cent, off; swedes iron burrs, 45 per 
cent, off; copper rivets, 35 per cent.; 
coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. 
carton boxes, 50 per cent. off. 

Cordage — An improvement in the de- 
mand is to be noticed in certain lines this 
week. The base prices are reduced to 14c. 
for Manila, and Q^c. for sisal. 

Spades and Shovels — Some few lots 
have moved out this week. The discounts 
are 40 and 5 per cent. 

Firebricks — We quote $17 to $24 per 
1,000, as to brand. 

Cement — The demand continues fair, as 
some large buildings which are now being 
built are requiring extensive supplies. 
We quote as follows : German, $2.40 to 
52.60 ; English, $2.30 to $2.40 ; Belgian, 
$1.80 to $2. 10. 

Tacks — Tacks have been reduced all 
around. Carpet tacks in dozens and bulk, 
blued, 80 and 5 per cent, discount ; tinned, 
80 and 10 per cent.; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens, 75 and 15 per cent, discount. 



TINPLATES 

"LYDBROOK," "TRYM," 
"GRAFTON," "ALLAWAYS," 
"CANADA CROWN," ETC 

CANADA PLATES 

" DOMINION CROWN " All Polished. 
"ALLAWAYS" heat Half Bright. 
"PONTYPOOL" Half Bright. 
"DOMINION CROWN" Galvanized. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 



MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada 



ADAJH HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Offer from Store, 
Montreal, Toronto and Hamilton: 



Special Values in 

Galvanized Iron 

QUEEN'S HEAD. COMET 
AND APOLLO BRANDS. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHY BUY YOUR 
VARNISH IN BARRELS 

and go to all the trouble of running to 
the cellar and measuring it out in small quantities ? 

It is a waste of time and varnish, and both 
cost money. Elastilite saves all this unnecessary 
trouble and expense. 

It is put up in neat lithographed tins, from 
^-pints to i -gallon, with a large Show Can sup 
plied free with the first 12 -gallon order, in assorted 
sizes, making one of the most attractive ads. you 
can have in your store. 

Elastilite advertises your business. It is a 
good varnish for all purposes, either inside or out- 
side. Once used, no other can take its place. 



-Manufactured only by- 



The 



Imperial Varnish k Color Co. 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



LIMITED 



WE HAVE A LARGE AND FULLY ASSORTED 
STOCK OF 

Harvest Tools 



Forks, 
Rakes, 
Hoes, 
Scythes, 



Snaths, 
Spades, 
Shovels, 
Etc., 



and will guarantee prompt shipment from 
warehouse for immediate orders. 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



METALS. 

The general tone of the metal market is 
easy, and consequently trade is rather 
sluggish. 

Pig Iron — In the United States, Besse- 
mer pig has declined $2 per ton, to J 18, 
and steel billets, $2.50 per ton, to $22 50. 
Some pig iron has changed hands this week 
at open prices, from $23 50 to $24. 50. 

Bar Iron — Has been shaded this week, 
and we now quote #2.20 to $2.25 per 100 
lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

Black Sheets — There is not much 
doing. We quote the base on 8 to 20 
gauge at $2.95. 

Galvanized Iron — The tone is sluggish. 
We quote : No. 28 Queen's Head, $4.75 
to $5.00, and Comet, No. 28, $4.40 to 
$4.65. 

Ingot Copper — Foreign markets still 
continue firm. We still quote I7X C » 

Ingot Tin — In both local and foreign 
markets there have been strong advances. 
The price here is 36c. 

Lead — We quote the base at $4.50. It 
is firm at that price. 

Lead Pipe — The demand is fair. We 
quote: 7c. for ordinary and 7J£c. for 
composition waste, with 15 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — The demand is fair. We 
quote as follows: X> 82.95 P« r i°° ft-; 
Vi. $2.95; %. «3-io; %, $3.45; *. 85-20; 
1 XT. 86.75; l 'A> 28.IO, and 2-in., $11.00. 

Tinplates — Trade is featureless, with 
prices at 94.50 for coke and $4.75 for char- 
coal. 



Canada Plate — A further decline is to 
be noted. We quote : 52's, $3; 60' s, $3.15; 
75's, S3-io; full polished, $3.50, and gal- 
vanized, $4.60. 

Terne Plate — There is not much doing. 
The price remains unchanged at $8.50. 

Swedish Iron — We quote #4. 25. 

Coil Chain — Business is also quiet 
in coil chain. We quote as follows : 
No. 6, I2j£c, No. 5, 11c; No. 4, io^c; 
No. 3, 10c; #-inch, 8#c; 5-16, $5.50 ; 
Vt, 95-35: 7-i6, 85.00; %, 84-75 I 9-i6, 
84-7o; %, 84-35: #.84-25; ft, 84-20, 
and 1 inch, 84. 10. 

Sheet Zinc — Lower prices prevail this 
week, and we quote 6% to 6^c. 

Antimony — Unchanged at 10 j£c. 
PAINTS AND OI1.8. 

Notwithstanding the intense heat and 
excessive humidity, a satisfactory business 
has been done in paint and oil circles during 
the past week. There has been a little 
better call for paris green, and liquid paints 
are also experiencing a good demand. 
There has been no change to note in the 
white lead situation locally, but lead pro- 
ducts in Glasgow and on the Tyne are much 
firmer. It is thought that there will be a 
brisk demand for ground white lead in 
Canadian markets directly the autumn 
trade commences to open, as stocks 
are said to be low in the country. We 
quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 86.75 ; No. 1, 86.37X > No. 2, 
86; No. 3, $5.62*4, and No. 4, 85-25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal, prompt cash. 



Dry White Lead— 85.75 in casks; kegs, 



casks, 85-io; in 



No. 



86 

Red Lead — Firm 
kegs, 85-35 to 85-5°- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c. 
I, 6j£c.;in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7#c. 

Putty -We quote : Bulk, 81.95; blad- 
ders, in bbls., 82.10; bladders, in cases, 
82.25; in tins, 82.35 to 82.60. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 84c. ; boiled, 
87c, five to nine-barrels, ic. less, ten 
and twenty-barrel lots open, net cash, plus 
2c. for 4 months. Delivered anywhere in 
Ontario between Montreal and Oshawa at 
2c. per gallon advance and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 69c. ; two to 
four barrels, 68c; five barrels and over, 
open terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — Firm; 
gallon. 

Castor Oil — Firm ; S}( to gtfe. in whole- 
sale lots, and %z. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 4,7% to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c. 

Paris Green — Demand fair at firm prices; 
I -lb. packets, lg^ic and drums, i8#c. 

Naval Stores — An active business has 
been done in naval stores, and prices gen- 
erally rule steady. We quote : Resins, 
82.75 to 84-50, as to brand; coal tar, 
83-25 to 83-75 ; cotton waste. 4^ to $%c. 
for colored, and 6 to J%c. for white 
oakum, 5^ to 6#e, and cotton oakum, 
10 to lie. 



8i.2oto8i.4oper 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GLASS. 

Business is moderately fair, and will 
likely continue to be so throughout the 
sunimer. We quote as follows : First 
break. $2 ; second, $2.10 for 50 feet ; first 
break, 100 feet, S3. 80; second, $4 ; third, 
S4.50 ; fourth, $4.75 ; fifth, $5.25 ; sixth, 
S5.75, an< * seventh, $6.25. 

rKTROLKUM. 

There is no change in petroleum quota- 
tions. Trade is remarkable only for its 
summer dullness. We quote: "Silver 
Star," jobbers, i6^c. ; retail, I7^c. ; 
" Imperial Acme," 17^ an d i8^c; " S. 
C. Acme," i9and2oc; "Astral," 20 and 
2ic. 

HIDES. 

As last quoted : Beef hides, 8c. for No. 
1 ; 7c. for No. 2, and 6c. for No. 3. Calf- 
skins, 9c. for No. 1, and 7c. for No. 2. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Manila and sisal rope are quoted lower 
this week. 

Ingot tin is about the only advancing 
article in the metal trade. 

The discount lists of tacks have been 
entirely recast. 

The Canada Paint Company report heavy 
shipments of their "Khaki" brand of 
liquid paints. They are announcing to 
their customers that owing to summer holi- 
days their travelers may not be able to call 
regularly, and that letter orders will, as 
usual, have careful and prompt attention. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 20, 1900. 

HARDWARE. 

THE volume of business is a little better 
than it was. This, it will be re- 
membered, was one of the things that 
Hardware and Metal predicted as a 
result of the recent change in prices. 
Although business is a little better, it cannot 
be said to be brisk. As this is between the 
seasons, an active trade could scarcely be 
expected. The feeling, however, appears 
to be a little healthier, and advices from the 
United States report a better business in 
finished products. Fence wire of all kinds 
is quiet on the local market, and, although 
wire nails are quiet, there appears to 
be a slight improvement in the demand, 
but the lots wanted are small. In cut nails 
the demand is chiefly for shingle nails. 
Harvest tools are still going out well. Busi- 
ness is becoming more active in cutlery, and 
.a moderate trade is to be noted in sporting 
goods. Rope is without change in price, 
but the volume of business appears to be a 
little better. Fine steel wire is now quoted 
at 15 per cent, discount. The discount has 
also been changed on flour barrel nails 
and coopers' nails. The price of bright 
staples has been reduced to $3.45 per keg, 
and the discounts have all been increased 
on coopers' staples, poultry netting staples 
and double-pointed carpet tacks. Letter 




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ART ISTIC AND SERVICEABLE. 

r Metallic 
Ceilings and Walls 

are in popular favor with the most fastidious 
as well as the most practical people. 

They represent the triumph of beautiful, 
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Accurate in design, fitting perfectly — 
every smallest detail of the patterns con- 
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They give the acme of satisfaction at 
most moderate cost. 



Our finely illustrated Catalogue gives full information. 



METALLIC ROOFING CO, Limited 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 



KING and 

DUFFERIN 

STREETS, 



Toronto. 



orders are still fairly good, and payments 
are moderate. 

Barbed Wire — Very little is being done, 
and what is being transacted is from stock. 
We still quote f.o.b. Cleveland $2.95 in car- 
lots, and $3.05 in less than carlots ; f.o.b. 
Toronto, $3.25 in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — There is a little 
being done, but orders are very small. We 
quote as follows from Toronto : No. 5, 
$4.52^; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.85; No. 
9, $3.10; No. 10, $4; No. 11, $4.05; No. 
12, #3.25; No. 13, $3.35 ; No. 14, $4.40 ; 
No. 15, $5.10; No. 16, #5.15. The f o.b. 
price Cleveland for Nos. 6 to 9 base is $2. 80 
in less than carloads, and $2.70 for carloads. 
Terms are 60 days or 2 per cent. 10 days. 

Smooth Steel Wire — Scarcely any- 
thing is being done, only a few small orders 
being received. The base price is $3 per 
100 lb., as noted last week. 

Wire Nails — These are going out a 
little more freely this week, although the 
orders are small, and business generally 
cannot be considered any other but quiet. 
It is the general opinion that stocks are 
getting pretty well broken. We still quote 
53 in carlots and S3. 10 in less quantities. 

Cut Nails — There are a few going out, 
but the demand is chiefly for shingle nails. 
The base price is $2.60 per keg, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Hamilton. 

Horseshoes — Trade is without any 
improvement. We quote as follows, f.o.b. 
Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
light, medium and heavy, S3. 75 ; snow 
shoes, $4 ; light steel shoes, S3 95 ; 
featherweight (all sizes), SS-20 ; iron 
shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), S4; snow- 



shoe-, S4-25 ; light steel shoes, S4 20 ; 
featherweight, (all sizes), $5- 20. 

Horse Nails — These are still dull and 
featureless. We quote discount 50 per 
cent, on standard oval head, and 50 and 10 
per cent, on Acadia. 

Tacks — The discount on double pointed 
carpet tacks has been increased. In paper 
boxes the discount is 90 and 10 per cent, 
and 40 per cent, in bulk. The discount on 
coopers' nails is 30 per cent, instead of 25 
per cent, and on flour barrel nails 25 per 
cent, instead of 20 per cent. 

Staples — The price of bright staples has 
been reduced to S3 45 per keg, and the dis- 
count on coopers' staples is now 45 per 
cent., and on poultry netting staples 40 per 
cent. 

Screws — Trade is keeping active in this 
line and prices are unchanged. We 
quote : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off 
the list ; round head bright, 75 per cent.; 
flat head brass, 75 percent.: round head 
brass, 67 # per cent.; Hat head bronze, 
67% per cent.; roundhead bronze, 62 J^ 
per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— A good business is 
being done in stove bolts, and in tire bolts 
a fair trade is to be noted. We quote as 
follows : Norway bolts, full, square, 65 
per cent. ; common carriage bolts, all 
sizes, 50 per cent. ; ditto, full square, 65 per 
cent. ; machine bolts, all sizes, 52^ 
per cent. ; coach screws, 65 per cent. ; 
sleighshoe bolts, 70 per cent.; blank bolts, 
52# percent.; bolt ends, t>2% per cent.; 
nuts, square, 3#c. off; nuts, hexagon, 4c. 
off; tapping nuts, 60 per cent.; tire bolts, 
60 per cent.; stove bolts, 60 and 10 per 
cent. ; plough bolts, 50 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — A fair trade is 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



being done in rivets. We quote : Car- 
riage section, wagon box, rivets, etc. 50 per 
cent. ; black M rivets, 50 per cent. ; iron 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper rivets, 35 per 
cent. ; bifurcated, with box, 5-lb. carton 
boxes, 30c. per lb. 

American Wrought Padlocks — The 
manufacturers in the United States advanced 
their prices some time ago, and now, that 
the jobbing trade in Canada have got to 
import at the higher prices, they are mark- 
ing up their quotations to the retail trade 
about 20 per cent. 

Lumbermen's Supplies — The wholesale 
trade are beginning to lay in supplies, and 
there have already been a few shipments 
sent forward during the past week. 

Enameled Ware — Trade in this line 
continues good, particularly in such lines as 
preserving kettles. 

Ice Cream Freezers— These are going 
out well, and are really about the only 
summer line of goods that are moving at 
all freely. 

Rope — The demand for rope has been a 
little better during the past week, but 
whether it is due to the recent reduction in 
prices or not we cannot say. We quote as 
follows: Pure manila, 13^ to 14c; "A" 
quality manila, n>£ to 12c. ; special 
manila, 10^ to 11c. ; sisal, g)4 to 10c. 

Binder Twine — There is still a small 
business being done, although the manufac- 
turers are still looking to a better business 
later on. On account of the low price at 
which some of last year's twine is being 
offered the market is unsettled, although 
the hemp market itself is rather weak. 

Harvest Tools — There is still a fairly 
good trade being done, and stocks are in a 
fairly good condition. The discount is still 
50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — There are a few 
going out, but the business does not amount 
to a great deal. Discount 40 and 5 per 
cent. 

SportingGoods — Some business is being 
done, and shipments are coming forward for 
the wholesale houses. 

Cutlery — Business is beginning to move 
a Utile more freely, although in a sortingup 
way. 

Cement — The local market has im- 
proved since last week, though prices have 
not changed. At outside points a heavy 
demand continues at prices quoted. We 
quote as follows in barrel lots : Cana- 
dian Portland, #2.80 to $3 ; Belgian, #2.75 
to $3; English do., $3; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, $1.25 to 81.50 ; calcined plaster, 
$1.90 ; asbestos cement, $2.50 per bbl. 
METALS. 

The feature of the metal market during 
the past week has been the strength in pig 
tin, prices having advanced materially in 



the outside markets, and quotations locally 
are 2c. higher. Copper has also shown a 
great deal of firmness in London, England. 
Pig iron has declined another $1 per ton in 
the United States during the past week. 
Solder is y z c. higher locally. In other lines 
of metals prices are much the same as 
before. 

Pig Iron — The market is still weak, and 
the feature has been the decline of another 
$ 1 per ton in the United States in foundry 
iron. 

Bar Iron — The market is still weak, and 
there is not much business being done. The 
ruling price for small lots is $2.25 base. 

Hoop Steel — There is a little business 
being done in this line at the $3 25 base. 

Pig Tin — The outside markets have 
advanced steadily during the past week or 
10 days until Wednesday last, when there 
was a reaction, and prices dropped about 
£2 in London. Since then, however, there 
has been a slight recovery, but the tone of 
the market has lost a great deal of its 
strength. Locally, prices are 2c. per lb. 
higher than they were a week ago, the quo- 
tation now being 37 to 38c. per lb. Trade 
locally is fairly active in pig tin, although 
the quantities wanted are small. Stocks on 
hand are still light. 

Tinplates — Business in this line has 
improved a good deal, and an active trade 
is being done. Our quotations remain 
unchanged. 

Tinned Sheets — There is not much 
being done and the little business that is 
transpiring is in small lots. 

Galvanized Sheets — Trade in gal- 
vanized sheets is fairly active, although the 
market is devoid of any special featuie. 
We quote : 28 gauge, English, at $5 in case 
lots, and American at $4.60 in ton and 
half ton lots. Add 15c. for smaller 
quantities. 

Black Sheets — Trade in this line is 
only moderate. We still quote the base 
price at $3.60. 

Iron Pipe — Although the agreement 
among jobbers is only of recent origin, the 
market seems to be already again unsettled 
on account of the cut in prices. Our quota- 
tions in the meantime are largely nominal. 
Business is only moderate. Discounts 
are now as follows : Black pipe, X to 
Y% inch, 40 per cent. ; l / z inch, 60 per 
cent.; % to 2 inch, 66% per cent.; larger 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent. Galvanized pipe: 
% inch, 40 per cent. ; ^ to 2 inch, 50 per 
cent. 

Lead Pipe — Business is fair. We quote 
7c. per lb., with discount 15 per cent., f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

Lead — Business is a little more active 
both in large and small lots. We quote 5 
to s^c per pound. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 



ie 



WELLINGTON 



KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, H.V. 

DERBY SIS A P. 

With Plated Rust Proof 
and Guarded Spring 

" THE LATEST AND BEST." 

For Sale hy 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

BE** K Z^'s'/l Toilet, Il»n<l, Electric Power 

V ARE THE BEST. 

flight ji Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

6DTD FOB CATALOGtn TO 
Aatrllaa Shearer life. Co., Raihn 





NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door, Closer, 
They work silently and effectually, and never get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE BOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Burman & Sons , limited 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 
The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of It'issia'sStablesand Field Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 lo 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont. r _ 



JSS Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

■SKfi Main Office and Works, 

«^ Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

On sale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Solder— Prices are %c. per lb. higher, 
in sympathy with the advance in pig tin. 
We quote : Half and half, 2\y 2 to 22^c; 
reuned. 21 to2i#c, and wiping, 20^ to 
2ic. 

Antimony — Is quite unfeatureless at 1 1 
to iij£'c. for Cookson's. 

Canada Plates — There is not much 
business being done, although some in- 
quiries are being heard. We quote : All 
dull, $3.50; half-polished, $3 .60, and all 
bright. $4. 

Copper — The London market is firmer, 
and one day this week there was an ad- 
vance of 105. per ton. In New York, the 
disposition to firmness has not been so 
marked. Ingot copper is quiet locally, but 
a fair business is being done in sheet cop- 
per. We quote 19^ to 20c. for ingot, and 
23 to 23 y£c. for sheet copper. 

Zinc Spelter — There is more movement 
than there was a week ago, but the volume 
of business is not large. We quote 7 to 
7#c per lb. 

Zinc Sheets — Trade is fair, but without 
any particular feature. We quote 7_j£c. for 
casks and 7^c. for part casks. 

Chain — A reduction is announced in the 
price of coil chain. Quotations are now : 
5-16 inch, $4.85 to $5.35 ; ^ inch, $4.80 
to $5.30; 7-16 inch, $4 50 to #4.95 ; j4- 
inch, $4.25 to $4.65 ; j^ inch, $3 80 to 
$4.20; 2^-incb, $3 75 to $4. 15; ?<; to 1 -inch, 
$3.70 to $4 10. We were not advised of 
the changes soon enough to make correc- 
tions in our prices current. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The market is still very quiet. Paris 
green, however, keeps firm at steady prices, 
and the demand keeps good. Other lines 
are somewhat falling off. Linseed oil is 
firm. It cannot be delivered in Canada at 
present prices. Canadian buyers are still 
in many cases reselling their goods in Eng- 
land, thus taking the supply from the Cana- 
dian market. Turpentine has advanced 
}£c. twice this week in Savannah, and 
dealers say that an advance may be looked 
for here shortly. We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.87^; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2, $6.12^ 
No. 3, 8S-75; No. 4, $5 ; dry white lead is 
casks, J5.75. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 55.75 ; 
No. 1, in casks of 560 lb. ,$5 to $5.25; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $5.25 to #5.50. 

Litharge and Orange Mineral — 
Litharge, 6 to b%z. ; orange mineral, 8 
to 8j£c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb.; Gilders' 
, £ whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22^c. ; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty- — Bladders, in bbls., 52.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.15 ; bulk, in bbls., 
$1.95 ; bulk, in less quantities, $2.10. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $ 1.90 
per barrel. 

Paris Green — Petroleum, bbls., 18c. ; 
arsenic, kegs, 18 %c. ; drums, 50 and 100 
lb. i8^c. ; drums, 25 lb., \g%c. ; tins, 1 
lb., 2o^c; tins, ^ lb. 22^c; packages, 1 
lb., i9^c. ; packages, % lb., 2i^c. 



84,000 Daily Production. 
5 Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sala all 
over tha World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90,, Largest Mfrs. 70 of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I , U S A. 



Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled Chequered, and Rough Plate Glas*. 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, eml' 

or with incised gilt letters Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 

Works: Ravenhead, St. Helena, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street London, E.G.— 128 Hope Street, Glasgow— 
12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Paradise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glase, St. Helens.' Telephone No 
68 St Helens. 



Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2. 50 per cwt. 
ii barrels, and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less quan- 
tity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. in 
barrels. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $ 1.20 to $ 1.30 per 
gallon ; No 1 quality, $1.00 per gallon.' 

Seal Oil — 54c. per gallon, and yellow 
seal at 45c. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 
to io^c. per lb. and io>£ to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
86c; boiled, 89c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 85c; 
boiled, 88c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, Guelph and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 71c; two 
to four barrels, 70c, delivered to outside 
points. Toronto, Hamilton, London, Sarnia, 
Walkerville, Chatham, Dresden. Wallace- 
burg and Amherstburg, 2c less. For less 
quantities than barrels, ;c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

Prices have stiffened since last week, and 
present quotations are firm. The threatened 
strike in Belgium will likely cause an ad- 
vance. As yet, however, there is no change, 
and trade continues to be quiet. We quote 
first break locally : §tar, in 50 foot boxes, 
$2.10, and 100-foot boxes, #4.00 ; double 
diamond under 26 united inches, $6. 00, 
Toronto Hamilton and London ; terms 
4 months or 3 per cent., 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL 

The demand is still poor, and prospects 
for an improvement are not bright. 
Dealers say that this is the poorest 
season for a long time. We quote 
jobbers' prices : Agricultural scrap, 50c. per 
cwt. ; machinery cast, 50c perewt. ; stovecast 
scrap, 40c; No. 1 wrought scrap, 50c per 
100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 12c per 
lb. ; bottoms, io^c ; heavy copper, 12c ; 
light scrap brass, 7c. ; heavy yellow scrap 
brass, 10c ; heavy red scrap brass, 10^ c ; 
scrap lead, 2^c; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 
5c. ; good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c ; 
clean dry bones, 40 to 50c per 100 lb. 

COAL. 

The market is rather quiet this week. 
Dealers do not anticipate any change in 
retail prices until about September 1. 
Our quotations for anthracite on cars at 
Buffalo and bridges are as follows : Nut, 
egg and stove, S4.50 per gross ton, or 
54.01 per net ton ; grate, 84.25 per gross 
ton, or $3. 79 per net ton. 



PETROLEUM. 

There is a brisk trade doing, considering 
the season. There is no change in prices. 
We quote as follows : Pratt's Astral, 18c 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; American 
water white, 18c in barrels ; Photogene, 
I7^c; Sarnia water white, 17c in barrels; 
Sarnia prime white, 1 6c in barrels. 



market notes. 

Coil chain is lower. 

Pig tin is 2C per lb. higher locally. 

Turpentine is ic higher in Savannah. 

Solder is quoted y z z. per lb. higher in 
sympathy with tin. 

Bright staples, coopers' staples and 
poultry netting are all lower in price. 

The discount on fine steel wire is now 15 
per cent, instead of 12 y z c. per cent. 

The discount on coopers' nails has been 
increased to 30 per cent., and on flour 
barrel nails to 25 per cent. 

The discount on double-pointed carpet 
tacks has been increased to 90 and 10 per 
cent, in paper and 40 per cent, in bulk. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co. are in 
receipt of shipments of cutlery from Joseph 
Elliot & Sons, John Askham & Sons, and 
Henry Boker & Co. 

PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Harry Walker, of Toronto, is man- 
aging the hardware business of D. Ferguson, 
Teeswater, during Mr. Ferguson's absence 
on an extended tour to the Northwest. 



STOVEMEN AMONG THE THOUSAND 
ISLANDS. 

While the stove manufacturers were in 
Gananoque they were under the especial 
care of The James Smart Manufacturing 
Co., Limited, of Brockville, and well did 
that company perform its self-imposed 
dulies. After business had been disposed 
of, The Smart Manufacturing Co. chartered 
a steamer and took the stovemen through 
the Thousand Islands. The steamer left 
the wharf at 9 a.m., and did not return till 5 
p.m. 

At one of the islands a stop was made, 
and the waiter, who had been brought 
from a Gananoque hotel, laid cloths on the 
rocks and provided a good feast for the 
hungry excursionists. 

The stove manufacturers will long remem- 
ber their session at Gananoque, for, through 
the munificence of The Smart Manufactur- 
ing Co., it was made the most pleasant in 
their history as an organization. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 16, 1900. 

The volume of business in all lines of 
hardware is fair for the time of year. The 
uncertainty as to the crop in June had the 
effect of somewhat curtailing building 
operations and this, in turn, has made the 
sale of building hardware smaller than was 
anticipated early in the season. The fol- 
lowing is the revised price list to date : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 75 

Plain twist 3 75 

Staples 4 2 5 

Oiled annealed wire io 3 95 

" 11 4 00 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 4 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 75 

" 16 and 20 3 80 

10 3 85 

8 3 9° 

6 40S 

4 4 15 

3 4 4° 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 330 

" 20 to 40 3 35 

'■ 10 to 16 3 40 

8 3 45 

6 3 6o 

4 3 70 

3 3 9S 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 65 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 5 15 

No. 2 and larger 4 90 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 520 

No. 2 and larger 4 95 

Bar iron, $2.90 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5 basis. 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13°° 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 °° 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 4 25 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 °° 

28 gauge 5 2 5 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 14 75 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 5° 

Broken lots .-. 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 4 5° 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 and 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 45 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger 11 25 

% " 75 

}i and 5-16 1225 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 15 00 

H 15 50 

y t and 5-16 1600 

Solder 23^ 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 15 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 p c. 

Flat ' ' brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57H p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 4 2 ^ P c - 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 55 P-c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 37 l A pc. 

Copper, No. 8, lb 33^c. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 5°. and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 5° 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Linseed oil, raw, per gal 9a 

boiled " 95 



Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 40 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 10 p.c. 

C.F. military Net. 

Loaded shells, Robin Hood, M $20 00 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 2300 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 7 25 

Chilled 750 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Robin Hood 10 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

Turpentine, by barrel 80c. 

Less than barrel 85c. 

IRON MOULDERS' WAGES- 

The strike of the Montreal moulders has 
been settled. The terms of agreement are 
in effect as follows: That $2 15 per day 
shall be the minimum rate of wages until 
May 1, 1901, and thereafter, unless other- 
wise decided. This minimum rate is not to 
apply to boys until six months after their 
apprenticeship, or to physically incapacitated 
moulders. If either party desires a change 
after May I, 1901, they must give 30 days' 
notice to the other party, and if no notice be 
given the agreement is to stand for another 
year, and so on from year to year. The 
agreement was signed by the chairmen of 
Iron Moulders' Union No. 21, National 
Founders' Association and Iron Moulders' 
Union of America. 

A REMODELED STORE. 

Mr. W. Stewart, hardware merchant, 
Tilbury, has remodeled his large store and 
put in a full front plate glass window. He 
has put in a fine suite of offices on the south 
side and reports business in principal lines 
in advance of last year. Mr. Stewart is 
also extensively engaged in milling. 

CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 

Montreal. 



TRENT CANAL 



SIMCOE-BALSAM LAKE DIVISION. 
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS. 

SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, 
and endorsed " Tender for Trent Canal," will be 
received at this Office until noon Friday, 24th August, 
1900, for the construction of about thirteen miles of Canal 
between Kirkfield and Lake Simcce, which will be divided 
into two Sections. 

Plans, specifications of the work and forms of Contract 
can be seen at the office of the Chief Engineer of the 
Department of Railways and Canals, at Ottawa, or at the 
Superintending Engineer's Office, Peterborough, where 
forms of tender can be obtained on and after Tuesday, 
24th July, 1900. 

_ In the case of firms there must be attached the actual 
signatures of the full name, the nature of the occupation, 
and place of residence of each member of the same, and, 
further, an accepted bank cheque for the sum of $15,000 
must accompany the tender for each section ; these 
accepted cheques must be endorsed over to the Minister of 
Railways and Canals, and will be forfeited if the parties 
tendering decline entering into contract for work at the 
rates and terms stated in the offer submitted. The 
accepted cheques thus sent in will be returned to the 
respective parties whose tenders are not accepted. 
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted 
By order, 

L. K. JONES, 

Secretary. 
Department of Railways and Canals, 1 
Ottawa, July i6th, 1900. J 

Newspapers inserting this advertisemc nt without author- 
ity from the Department will not be paid for it. (31) 



H 



K 
H 

KHAKI 

K 

I 

FLOOR PAINT 



K 
H 

KHAKI 

K 

I 



FLOOR PAINT 



Description — The Khaki floor paint is 
the most fashionable and durable paint 
manufactured. 

It is also useful for steps, stairs, veran- 
dahs and all surfaces subjected to HARD 
WEAR. The " Khaki " is a pronounced 
success, and a large number of repeat 
orders have been received by the sole 
makers, The Canada Paint Company. 
There are 24 % gals, and 12 y 2 gals, 
respectively in a case — $1.10 per gallon. 
Package in case lots, free. Sample cards 
will be mailed to any address at home or 
abroad upon application to the manu- 
facturers of KHAKI. 

THE 

CANADA 
PAINT CO. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO AND MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 







THE 



•% 



I 



Klatson, Tosicr Co., 



LIMITED 



^MONTREAL. 




.'V PAPER HANE INI? B C] 



r*j 



m^ 



* 




WALL PAPER 
MANUFACTURERS 



J 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



THE MONTREAL BOARD OF HEALTH. 

ITS DUTIES AND LIMITATIONS. 
By Alderman H. B. Ames, B.A., Chairman of the Hygiene Committee. 



THE following are extracts made from 
a paper read before the Montreal 
Medico- Chirurgical Society by Aid. 
H. B. Ames, B. A., chairman of the hygiene 
committee. It will no doubt prove of 
interest to the plumbing trade : 

"Among the duties laid upon the local 
board of health by the city charter, by the 
Provincial regulation and by the municipal 
bylaws are the following : 

"i. To enforce all sanitary measures 
regarding the cleanliness of the city. 2. To 
take precautionary steps to prevent the 
spreading of contagious and infectious dis- 
eases. 3. To collect and compile mortuary 
and birth statistics. 4. To seize and con- 
fiscate deleterious articles of food. 5. To 
supervise the drainage, plumbing and ven- 
tilation of new buildings. 6. To examine 
schools, factories, workshops and the like 
with reference to their sanitary condition, 
and to cause to be vacated such buildings 
as are unfit for human habitation. 7. To 
appoint such officers as may be necessary 
from time to time to put the provisions into 
effect. 

"The amount voted by the council to be 
expended under the supervision of our com- 
mittee for the services above described is 
somewhat under $40,000 per annum. Usu- 
ally, about 50 persons make up the 
executive staff. At the head of the depart- 
ment is the medical health officer, Dr. Ls. 
Laberge, who has been in charge for the 
past 15 years, and who now receives a 
salary of $3,000 a year, plus an allowance 
of $250 for horse keep. Immediately 
responsible to the medical health officer are 
the secretary, accountant and messenger of 
the department. All orders of the com- 
mittee are transmitted by the secretary to 
the medical health officer, and are by him 
issued to his various subordinates. 

THE CLEANLINESS OF THE CITY. 

" It is the duty of the board of health to 
see to it that all sanitary measures relating 
to the cleanliness of the city are put in 
force. A considerable code of such regula- 
tions exists in the form of by-laws passed 
from time to time by the council. As 
previously explained, the board of health 
no longer undertakes to clean the streets 
and the lanes, but is (or should be at least) 
the watchful inspector to overlook such 



work, now in the hands of another depart- 
ment, and to see that it be properly done. 
To this end there is a municipal force known 
as the sanitary police. It consists of a 
captain, one lieutenant and 19 inspectors. 
The officers and men wear a blue serge 
uniform with a forage cap and a metal 
badge, so as to be readily distinguished by 
the citizens. Each badge worn by an in- 
spector has thereon a distinctive letter of 
the alphabet, so that, should any citizen 
desire to make complaint regarding a given 
sanitary official, identification presents no 
difficulty. For the purpose of visitation the 
city is divided into 12 districts. To each 
district is assigned one sanitary inspector. 
It is his duty to make a careful house-tcf- 
house inspection and to cover his entire 
district twice a year. As, however, these 
inspectors are frequently taken from their 
regular work for special duties, such as, at 
present time, the inspection of lanes, yards 
and privy pits, 1 must admit that the city is 
not covered as required. 

"The majority of recorded complaints are 
upon such items as the following : Repairs 
needed on given premises to put the plumb- 
ing or drainage into proper order; unhealthy 
house, dilapidated, overcrowded, damp or 
dirty; privy full, in need of cleaning, or in 
bad repair; manure box unemptied; filth or 
water in the cellar; dirty yard, lane or 
vacant lot in need of cleaning, etc. The 
following morning the office staff examines 
the several books, collects and classifies the 
various complaints and the work of taking 
the necessary steps to abate each separate 
nuisance is assigned to officials regularly 
employed for this purpose. In every case 
the proprietor is notified that the nuisance 
must be abated forthwith and is given 
reasonable time to comply with the demand. 
At the expiry of the delay specified the 
premises are revisited. If the nuisance has 
not been abated, action is taken in the 
Recorder's Court against the delinquent. In 
the past I find that aldermanic influence has 
frequently come between the department 
and the proprietor for the protection of the 
latter. I have known of cases where notorious 
nuisances have been permitted to continue, 
because the owner of the premises had the 
powerful protection of an aldermanic friend. 
It is astonishing how many citizens, even 
electors of mine, consider that their alder- 



man, as their representative at the city ball, 
is there mainly to protect them from being 
forced to comply with the existing by-laws. 
Another difficulty lies in the fact than the 
sanitary officials have been chosen, in 
many instances, without any reference to 
any special aptitude for the work, their 
selection having been purely the result of 
aldermanic cabal. 

SUPERVISION OF PLUMBING AND 
VENTILATION. 

A further duty devolving upon the health 
department is the examination of drains, 
plumbing and ventilation in buildings 
erected from time to time throughout the 
city. Theoretically, each person intending to 
erect or repair a building is bound to sub- 
mit his plans for the approval of the board 
of health, where they are supposed to be 
examined by the sanitary engineer, and 
report made accordingly. We have now 
before council a new draft of bylaw in- 
tended to make still more severe the regu- 
tions concerning sanitary plumbing. Until 
within two months, with the exception of 
the sanitary engineer, Mr. Dore, not an 
employe of the health department had any 
knowledge, prior to his appointment, of 
plumbing. The two recent appointees, 
however, on this staff have been journeymen 
plumbers of experience. Two of the sani- 
tary police visit and examine all new houses, 
and report regarding the same, and no new 
work is permitted to be covered over unless 
approved. When the work has been 
finished it is tested by means of smoke, oil 
of peppermint, water, etc. ; if not satisfac- 
tory the defects must be remedied within a 
reasonable delay. Here again aldermanic 
interference is a great drawback. A pro- 
prietor fails to conform to the regulations, 
and is reported and threatened with suit. 
An alderman appears at the c ity hall and 
demands that the case be not pushed, and 
threatens to have the scalp of the health 
officer if he insists upon doing his duty. 
Many are the cases in the past which have 
thus been abandoned, and we are to-day 
reaping the results in outbreaks of disease 
in buildings constructed in defiance of sani- • 
tary regulations. 

INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, FACTORIES, ETC. 

"The sanitary inspectors are charged 
with the duty of visiting and examining as to 
sanitary conditions, drainage and ventila- 
tion, etc., the various schools, factories, 
workshops, etc., throughout the city. If 
they are not in proper condition, the pro- 
prietor may be compelled to put same into 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



MANUFACTURERS 



OF 



PLUMBERS' 
-. STEAMFITTERS' 

ssss SUPPLIES 



FU 
BEST Q 



./ 



The Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg.Co. 



TORONTO 




HOT WATER 
I NSTANTLY, 

NIGHT OR DAY. 

Boiling Water 
in a Minute. 
Hot Bath When Wanted 



EWART'S 

"LIGHTNING" 
GEYSER 

FOR GAS OR OIL. 

346 EUSTON ROAD. 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Illustrated Price List Free 



WHY SO MANY ADOPT 




BENNETTS SHELF BOX. 

They display gocds, attract customers, make salrs, 
save rcoin, keep stcck in order, and help to serve cus- 
tomers quickly — all elements to success. Put them in 
now and get ready for the Fall trade. Prices and 
particulars from the patentee and maker, 

J. S. BENNETT, 



20 Sheridan Ave. " TORONTO 

N.1I. — Boxei mule to fit your present shelving. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of wh;it 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PHisSOiPPING BUREAU, 

5 5 Board of Trade Bldp., MONTREAL, QUE 

Telephone Main 1255. 
26 1 out St West, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will h- Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attend id to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers ot 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 




KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220% Board of Trade. MONTREAL. 

SPECIALTIES C BlMd Sol 

Horse Null Co. 

BOLT8— Tire and Stove Blvetl ot nil I 
craft Bon 

BRA8S GOODS Sunn OMtor Co., Limit" 
mlngham, Bng. 



iARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

WORCESTER, MASS., U. S. A. 




"S^e REVOLVERS 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE. 

For sale by Sporting Goods and 
Hardware Stores almost everywhere. 



Berlin Felt Boot Co. 



BERLIN, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Guaranteed 
BEST and 
CBEAPEST 
in the 
market. 



HAIR FELT 



Made in 
1 2 INCH 
3/4 " 



For Water and Steam Pipe Covering. 

We keep a Large Stock to make Prompt Shipments. 



AS GOOD AS THE 
BEST, AND BETTER 
THAN MOST. 



The 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, CAN. 



Special list of low-priced Japanned 
and Regalvanized Wire Cloth. 

24. 30, 36 in. wire, in 50 ft. rolls. 

SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED WrllTE FOR PRICES. 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



good repair. As a matter of fact, however, 
these duties have of late years been left to 
the inspectors appointed by the Provincial 
Government. It is largely out of the hands 
of the municipal authorities. 

" Sometimes a sanitary inspector reports 
a building to be unfit for human habitation 
by reason of the fact that it is reeking with 
infection, is dilapidated or in a filthy con- 
dition. On order of the medical health 
officer the occupants are then required to 
vacate within eight days and the reoccupa- 
tion of the premises forbidden until restored 
to proper condition. This power is not 
used as often as it should be. It is very 
difficult to make out a case in court against 
the proprietor, and aldermanic interference 
is often worked to the utmost. We recently 
condemned a block on Busby Lane, and, as 
it is in my own ward, we have been able 
to press the matter to a conclusion. The 
block is now being demolished. 



MONTREAL PLUMBING CONTRACTS. 

Lessard & Harris have the contracts for 
the plumbing and heating of two houses on 
Dubord street. 

Lessard & Harris announce that they are 
going to do the plumbing and roofing of 
the new building being erected by the 
C.P.R. Telegraph Co. 

Carroll Bros, have secured the contract of 
the plumbing and lighting of 14 houses on 
Park avenue, and the plumbing, heating 
and lighting of four houses on Chomedy 
street, for Mr. Collins. 

H. R. Ives & Co., of Montreal, have the 
contract of furnishing the cast and wrought 
iron for the new building being erected by 
C.P.R. Telegraph Co. in that city. The 
Dominion Bridge Company will furnish the 
steel construction. H. R. Ives & Co. are 
also furnishing the cast and wrought iron 
for the new Grand Trunk Railway offices in 
Montreal. 

A peculiar glass roof of an oval shape is 
being erected on an extention of the Molsons 
Bank, in Montreal. Only one firm in the 
city. H. R. Ives & Co., were not afraid to 
tender on it and consequently this firm has 
the contract. It is being built for the pur- 
pose of introducing light into the rear of the 
bank, where darkness hitherto prevailed 
both day and night. Mr. Geo. W. Reed 
has the sub-contract for the flashing and 
roofing. 

TORONTO PLUMBING CONTRACTS. 

W. Mashinter & Co. have the contracts 
for plumbing and heating in residences for 
Isaac Price, on Greenwood avenue ; Wm. 
Harris, on Pape avenue, and G. Worth- 
ington, on Markham street. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Lecuyer & Boisvert, plumbers, Montreal, 
have registered partnership. 

G. J. Morton & Co., plumbers, etc., 
Yarmouth, N.S., have assigned. 

Martel & Langelier, plumbers, Three 
Rivers, Que. , have registered partnership. 

The Lawrence Hardware Company, Nel- 
son, B. C, will do the steam heating, 
plumbing, gasfitting, etc., in the Kirk- 
patrick-Wilson Clements block in that 
town. 



BUILDING NOTES. 

THE rebuilding of Sandon, B.C., is 
assured by John M. Harris, the prin- 
cipal town site owner. Another hotel 
will soon be commenced on the model of 
the burned Reco Hotel. 

A new post office is to be erected in 
S3rnia, Ont. 

Mr. Henry is building a dwelling at 
Monkton, Ont. 

Several buildings are in course of erection 
in Norwood, Man. 

T. Curry is about to build a residence in 
Beaverton, B.B. 

A Methodist church is being built at 
Moorefield, Ont. 

George Cummings will build a two-storey 
veneer store at London. 

George Cummings will build a two- storey 
brick residence in London. 

Capt. Cook is building a two-storey resi- 
dence at Parry Sound, Ont. 

A new Catholic church is lo be erected at 
Point aux Trembles, Montreal. 

H. W. Hohner is building a brick dwel- 
ling at Hickson, Ont. 

A brick building will shortly be erected 
by Simon Dennar, in Winnipeg, Man. 

Extensive improvements are to be made 
in St. John's church. Lansdowne, Ont. 

A three-storey building for a store is being 
erected at Sydney, N.S., for Prowse Bros. 

The Orangemen of Winnipeg are to erect 
a Scott memorial hall in that city. 

A large residence is about to be erected 
by Pat Burns, at Calgary, N.W.T. 

A large meeting house is being built for 
the Christian Alliance at Sydney, N S. 

The Banque du Peuple Building, Mont- 
real, is to have extensive improvements. 

Tenders are called for by Jamei Chis- 
holm, Winnipeg, for the erection of a frame 
residence there. 

Woeller, Bolduc & Co., furniture manu- 
facturers, Waterloo, Ont., are building a 
large addition to their factory. 

Work has commenced on the new G.T.R. 
station at East Toronto. It is expected to 
be completed in about three months. 

A tannery is to be erected in St. John, 
N.B. There will be four large buildings, 
one three storeys and the others two storeys. 

Tenders are wanted for the erection of 
school buildings in Toronto on Bathurst 
street, Essex street and Withrow avenue, 
and for the enlargement of the Park school. 

Building permits have been issued this 
week in Ottawa as follows : Mrs. A. Cook, 
brick veneered dwelling, Maple street, 
$1,250; Alex. Lavigne, frame house, Poplar 
street, $500 ; J. B. Giroux, brick veneered 
house, Queen street, $1,200 ; Andrew 
Fogerty, four brick veneered tenements, 
Lloyd street, $2,500 ; J. H. Primeau, two 
brick stores and dwellings, Duke street, 
$1,500; Andrew Mulligan, frame house, 
Rochester street, $800 ; John Deforme, 
frame dwelling, Poplar street. 

Building permits have been issued this 
week in Toronto as follows : Wardens of 
St. Paul's Episcopal church, for an addition, 
to cost $7,000; Bessie Page, for a detached 
brick dwelling on Crescent road, near Rose- 



dale road, to cost $3,500 ; Public School 
Board, for a school at the corner of Hamil- 
ton and St. Paul streets, to cost $11,000 ; 
W. H. Essy, for a pair of semi-detacjred 
brick dwellings on Jameson avenue, t "st 
side, near King, to cost $7,000; Eby, Blain, 
for a two -storey addition upon warehouses, 
Nos. 5 and 7 Scott street, to cost $6,000 ; 
Public School Board, additions to schools 
on Perth avenue, $9, 500 ; on corner of 
Hallam street and Bartlett avenue, $11,500, 
and on St. David street, $11,000; addition 
and alterations to school on corner of Win- 
chester and Ontaiio streets, $11,000; 
Gwatkin & Hughes, brick front and altera- 
tions to dwellings 284 and 286 Robert street, 
$1,200; J. B. Milhgan, alterations to dwell- 
ing 71 and 73 John street, $1,800. 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




HRS*C° 



UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL. 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 

Portland 
Cements 

T^» — BEST BRANDS. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Drain Pipes, 
Calcined Plaster, 

and a full stock of 

Builders' and Contractors' Supplies. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



W. McNally & Co. 



MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



!■■> 



ISLAND CITY 




The best way for a hardware dealer to insure the success 
of his business is to handle 

The Island City Mixed Paints 
Floor Paint dries hard in 8 hours 
The Island City Varnishes 
The Island City White Lead 
The Island City Pure Colors in Oil 
and Japan. 

Customers are sure when they buy our Island City Paints 
that they get the best value for their money. 



ALUMINUM SAFETY CHAIN 








P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, 

TORONTO, HALIFAX, WINNIPEG 



188-190 McGill Street 
MONTREAL. 








1 



n 



We are now making ALUMINUM "PLUMBERS" and "REGULAR" 

SAFETV CHAIN. The price is low. and for manv ptirposfs it is belter than the 
ordinary chain. We, of course, continue to manufacture the brass chain, making 
all the standard sizes and styles together with a complete assortment of accessories 
such as Shooks, bplit Links, etc. Special Plumbers' chain price list on application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, Niagara Falls, Canada 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. 

NORTON EMERY WHEELS 

properly selected for your work 
will give better results than any wheel you have 
used. We carry at all times a large assortment of 
wheels, and have many customers on our list for 
whom we carry special wheels. 

We should like to do it for you. 

NORTON BENCH 

FLOOR GRINDERS. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO 




749 CEAIG STREET, 



— IMIOILSrTieE^JL, GiTJE. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLOWMAKING NOW AND THEN. 

WITH all the familiarity with the 
economies of production which the 
investigator has given us, there 
come special cases that are still striking. 
We have learned that the cost of the labor 
that goes to the making of a pair of ladies' 
gaiters under the most improved processes 
of modern industry is but 37c. ; and we 
have been assured that the manufacturer of 
lumber in our country pays for the labor 
that goes to make each 1,000 feet but 93c. 
And we have learned what is the most signi- 
ficant thing of all, that, in spite of this 
surprisingly low labor cost, the earning 
capacity of the men and women who do the 
work is greater than it ever was, and greater 
than is that of any other similar class in any 
country in the world. Recently Mr. Carroll 
D. Wright, Commissioner of Labor, has 
been investigating the relative conditions of 
making plows now and 50 years ago, and 
the results are quite as surprising as are those 
he and other investigators have ascertained 
in other fields of production. He finds that 
52 men are now employed in the making of 
a single plow, against two half a century 
ago. The different operations now are 97 
in number, as against 1 1 then. Taking 10 
plows as the unit of computation, he finds< 
that the two workmen of that day took 
1, 180 hours to make them, while the 52 men 
of to-day take but 37 yi hours. Here again 
we find that low labor cost goes along with 
higher wage, for, while the labor cost of 10 
plows was S54-46 in 1850 and is but $y 
now, the wages paid have risen from 60c. 
a day to a range of from $1.25 to $2.60. 
It furnishes another demonstration of the 
truth of Schoenhof's economic paradox 
that " high-priced labor gives a low-priced 
product," although the comparison with 
other countries is lacking to complete it and 
show the converse that "low-priced labor 
gives a high-priced product." — Export 
Implement Age. 



ABOUT HARDWARE MERCHANTS. 

Chas. Richardson, hardware merchant, 
Harrow, Ont., is well satisfied with his town, 
his business having largely Increased. 

S. S. McKay, of Kingsville, having retired 
from the private banking business is now 
devoting all his time to his large hardware 
business. 

J. Rumball, hardware merchant, Harrow, 
Ont., has been doing a fine hardware trade 
during the past year. He would not do 
without Hardware and Metal, he says. 

W. D. Samson, hardware merchant, 
Blenheim, has during the past year found it 
necessary to have more room and enlarged 
his premises to nearly double former size, 



and though the season has generally been 
backward yet the volume of his business 
has increased. 

Barr & Teskey, hardware merchants, 
Merlin, having found their business increase 
so much as to require larger premises have 



now the contractors at work on their new 
brick block on Main street. Their new 
store when finished will be one of the finest 
in that part of the country. Being be 1 
practical men they have made their business 
a success. • 



"Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder" 

The cleanest, quickest and best of all. Hard grain, quick ignition, rapid 
combustion, slight residuum, no corroding of gun barrel or locks, high 
velocity, even pattern, great penetration, minimum pressure and recoil. 

Excellent keeping qualities, not affected by climatic influences. 

Safe, reliable, accurate, and pleasant to shoot. 

Absolutely Smokeless. 16-oz. to the pound. 

FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS WRITE TO 

HARRY C. MARLATT, General Sales Agent, SIIYICOE, ONT. 



Nobles 8f Mo arc 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



TRADE 




MARK 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



PERFECTION 
AUTOMATIC 
REVOLVER. 



NEW Automatic shell extracting, 
" t * ww double action, small frame. 
Weighs 12 oz. Rebounding lock. 32 
caliber. 5 shot. 

Made with shorter barrel for bicycle 
use. 

The most perfect small pistol made. 




Forehand 
Arms Co. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



Manufacturers of 
the 

Forehand Guns 

Worcester, 
Mass. 



1000-Mile 
Axle Grease 



IS THE 
BEST 



Put up in 1-lb. boxes and 
3, 5 and 10-lb. pails. 

SEND FOR PRICE LIST. 



The Campbell Mfg. Co. 



FORT ERIE, ONTARIO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent andMetal Broker 

13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Kepresenting British and American manufacturers of 
Tinplates.Tiunecihhcets, Terne Plates, Canada PlateB, Gal- 
vanized Sheets, Imitation RuasiaSheets, Black Sheets— Iron 
and Steel— Hoops and Bands, Proved Coil Chain, Brass and 
Copper Sheets, Norway Iron and Steel, Wheelbarrows.elc. 




VanTnyl & Fairbank 



Petrolla, Out. 
Headquarters for . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 

Pumps, Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools. Cables, etc. 






COOPER PATENT ELBOWS 

Bright and Common. 




E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

Sole Manufacturers 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



"JARDINE" 

TIRE UPSETTERS 
WILL UPSET TIRES 

— «. f> Some machines sold as TJpsetters will not. 

Perhaps you make as much money on the 
■ale of a useless Upsetter as on a good 
one, but your customer does not. He 
don't want a machine because It Is called 
an Upsetter he wants a machine to upset 
tlrea. Sell him one of ours. 

IT PAYS TO SELL THE BEST TOOLS 



B. JARDINE & CO. 
HESPELER, ONT. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦» 




Valves and Plungers. 

Only the very best leather and rubber are used 
in these goods, and all are carefully and evenly 
fitted, making them the best of their kind. 

Berger Bros. 
Co. \ 

PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A. 1 

► AiiAAAAiAAAAAAAAAAAiAAAAAAAAiAAAA AAA -*--*--*- -*- « 
▼ ■▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^ 



MANUFACTURERS 



Babbitt Metals . . . 
Tinners' and Plumbers' Solder 
Ingot Brass, etc. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

Pig Tin, Pig Lead 
Ingot Copper . . 
Antimony, etc. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. Fac,or ' es: M0NI,>EAL 



and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, 55S*HS5iiPSi- 



STEVENS IDEAL, NO. 44 

Bis 



Stevens Ideal Nfi44 




This is as reliable and 
accurate a rifle as can be 
constructed. Placed at a 
moderate price to meet the 
demand for such a rifle. It 
is recommended without 
qualification and fully guar- 



Standard length of barrel, for rim-fire 
F ) Standard length of barrel 



anteed. Made in the following styles : 

.22 Long-Rifle R. F., 25 Stevens R. F., and .32 Long R. F. 
cartridges, 24 inches. Weight 7 14 pounds. 

.25-20 Stevens C. F., .32-40 C. F., .38-55 C. F., and .44-40 (.44 W. C. 
for center-fire cartridges, 26 inches. Weight, 7% pounds. 

Half-octagon barrel, oiled walnut stock and fore-arm, rifle butt, case-hardened receiver, sporting rear 
and Rocky Mountain front sight. 

Price, with standard length of barrel, $13.00. 

Can be obtained of any of the leading jobbers in Canada at liberal discount from this price. 

Send for complete catalogue of our full line of Rifles, Pistols and Machinists' Tools. 

J, Stevens Arms & Tool Co,, P, Q. Box 2 1 7, Chicopee Falls, Mass,, U.S.A . 

HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Band Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, -white and colored, Tennis and Ply Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines, 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



AN IDEAL TRIP FOR TOURISTS. 



FOR years I have urged Canadians to 
spend their holidays in the Maritime 
Provinces, instead of at summer re- 
sorts on the United States Atlantic Coast. 
I must confess that until last summer I was 
influenced more by what we term patriotism 
than by knowledge gained by practical ex- 
perience. What I knew about the Maritime 
Provinces was acquired altogether from 
reading books, magazines and newspapers, 




St. John, N. B., Harbor. 

and from conversation with those who had 
visited the Provinces down by the sea. Now 
I am in the fortunate position to know 
whereof I speak. 

Reading is not seeing ; and I found that 
the half had never been told. 

I cannot speak from personal observation 
of Prince Edward Island. Time would not 
permit me to visit that delightful island. 
But, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, I 
could scarcely use terms too extravagant in 
regard to them. They are the paradise for 
tourists. 

It was a hot, sultry day in August when 
I boarded a Canadian Pacific train in 
Toronto. There had been no rain for some 
weeks, and, until we reached the island of 
Montreal, the country along which we sped 
in well-appointed cars looked unpleasantly 
thirsty and dry, and one caught the com- 
plaint, if complaint it can be called. But 
across the Ottawa and we were amid entirely 
new conditions. The fields were a luxuriant 
green, and the vegetation everywhere was 
bright and refreshing. 

When I awoke in the morning our train 
was in the State of Maine, traveling along 
the famous Short Line of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway to St. John, New Brunswick's capi- 
tal city. 

That portion of the State which the Short 
Line traverses will never be noted for its 



agricultural qualities. But agricultural 
qualities are not usually what the average 
tourist desires. What he wants is scenery, 
and the more and striking it is the better he 
likes it. This he gets as he speeds along 
the Short Line. But it is when he is well 
into the Province of New Brunswick that 
the prospect pleases most. 

For, mile after mile, there is one endless 
profusion of mountain and river scenery. 
One would almost think the 
road had been constructed 
with the special object of 
affording the tourist the 
maximum advantage of the 
glorious and varied colors 
that mountain, valley and 
river provide. I held a 
magazine between my fin- 
gers, but read I could not. 
The articles therein were 
interesting and to my taste, 
but the Book of Nature, 
with such pictures as I never 
saw before, was more so. 

By and-bye we reached 
the high bridge that spans 
the St. John river close to 
the famous reversible falls, 

as Maik Twain so aptly terms them. Some 

people may pooh-pooh the idea of reversible 

falls, but, if anything was ever reversible, 

these falls are. When I entered St. John 

they were falling toward the sea. A week 

later, when I returned, they were falling in 

the opposite direction ; in other words, they 

were falling up the river. 
But, while the falls were 

unique, wonderful, the River 

St. John itself is grand, is 

entrancing. From the deck 

of one of the big steamers 

that ply on the river one is 

held spellbound. At any 

rate, I was. The river is 

broad and majestic, with 

towering hills on either side 

which throw their shadows 

far into the river. 

I have seen the Hudson 
river, and only recently, 
too, but give me the St. 
John river in preference. 
The Hudson is grand and 
imposing. So is the St. 
John, but it is more. There 
is a wealth of color such as I never saw on 
the banks of any river before, while the 
glamour which hangs over hill top and in 
distant mountain recesses gives a decided 
mystery, an enchantment to the scene. 



And the mystery grows upon one as the 
steamer ascends the river past the Kenna- 
beccasis, until one begins to wonder if h<? is 
in the land of the living, in Dreamland, or 
on his way to Fairyland. Bye and-bye the 
dinner bell wakes one from his reverie, but, 
in the meantime, a picture has been photo- 
graphed on the memory that time, I think, 
can never efface. 



Once in St. John, no tourist should return 
home without first crossing the Bay of 
Fundy. The steamer leaves the wharf 
about 7 a.m., and less than three hours 
later she is carrying you through Digby Gut 
with its towering sugar-loaf hills on either 
side, into the famous Annapolis Basin. And 
the stiff breezes that strengthened your lungs 
and sharpened your appetite while crossing 
the Bay of Fundy give place to a balmy 
air redolent with seaweed and other not 
unpleasant odors, which remind you that 
you are nearing a fishing village. 

Digby town, at the eastern extremity of 
the Annapolis Basin, is reached in a few 
minutes. And when you get to Digby be 
sure and entrain for a trip through the 
Annapolis Valley, the land of Evangeline, 
with its curious dykes, its pretty and quaint 
towns and villages, its gloiious bits of dis- 
tances, its hills and valleys, and — its famous 
historical recollections. 

When you have reached Halifax and 
visited the many points of interest there, 
take the Intercolonial train and come back 
through Nova Scotia the opposite side from 
which you went down, again past dykes, 
again through glorious scenery of mountain 
and valley, and, just as evening sets in, 
you will find yourself back in St. John, with 
a Canadian Pacific. Railway train, withcom- 




Bearstone Mountain, Maine. 

fortable Pullman and well appointed dining 
car attached, waiting to take you past the 
reversible falls and back to home and 
friends, fully pursuaded in your mind that 
a better holiday trip you could have scarcely 
had on this or any other continent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



29 



it 



MIDLAND 



5J 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents : 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or. to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture ^v 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



July2'\ 1903. 
l'ticse prices are for such qualities ami 

31 unities as are usually ordered by retail 
ealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases ai better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desbe 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

MKTAL8. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 37 38 
traits 37 38 

Tinplates. 

Oharcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.O., usual sizes $7 00 

I.X.X., " 10 00 

Famous— 

. I.X.X 9 50 

Raven & Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 25 

LX., " 6 25 

I.X.X. " 7 25 

I. XXX., " 8 25 

D.C., 12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 SO 

D-X.X 75J 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual sizes 4 60 

I.C., special sizes, base. .. 4 85 

20x28 950 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. O. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 950 

I. X., Terne Tin 1150 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— Per II, 

X X.,14x56,50sheetbxs ) 

" Hx60 " C 07 07% 

** 14x65, " \ 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08 '4 

" 26 " 08% 09 

" 28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Base Price 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs 2 25 

Refined " " 2 65 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 50 

Hocp ateel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 25 

Sleigh Shoe Steel '• base. 2 35 

Tire Steel j ss 

Machinery 2 6) 

Cast Steel, per lb 00 00 

Toe Calk Steel 2 8) 

Tank Plates, 1-5 and thicker. 3 00 3 25 

Boiler Rivets 4 50 5 00 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inch 13 14 

* ' 15 16 

»% 18 19 

J " 19 20 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

Y*,i"°\- 3 25 

3-16 inoh 3 40 

*6 noh and thicker 3 25 

Black Sheets. 

18i»iue 3 jn 

20 gauge 3 20 

22 to 21 " 3 30 

* " 34) 

38 " 3 6J 



Canada Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 50 

Half polished 3 6J 

All bright 4 U0 

Iron Pipe. 
Discounts are as fallows -Black pi"e, ' , lu 
■"'„ in., 4 1 per cent. % ij., 69 per cent BtO 
2 in , 66-3 per cent. 1 irger sizes. 5) and 
per cent. Galvanized pipe, % in , 40 per 
cent 3 4 to 2 in , 50 per cent. 

tlalvaui/.u! Sheets. 

Queen's 
G 0. Comet. Amer Head 

16 gauge 4 40 4 25 

18 to 24 gauge 4 50 4 2) 4 40 4 50 

26 " 4 75 4 45 4 41 4 75 

28 " 5 00 4 70 4 60 5 00 

Less than case lots, 15c. per 1 00 lb. additional 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16in., per 1001b 

% " .... 8 50 

5-16 " " .... 6 00' 

% " " ... 5 45 

7-16 ' " ... 5 15 

% " " ... 5 "0 

% " " ... 4 8/ 

% " " .... 4 (5 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 41 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 and 5 p.c. 

.lack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
lack chain, brass, 3ingle and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c 

Copper 
Ingot 

English B. S, ton lots 19% 20% 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cutlengths, ound,%to%in. 23% 25 
1 ' round and square 

1 to 2 inches 2314 25 

Sheet. 
Untinned,14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 23 23% 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz, irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25% 

35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boilerand T. K. Pitts. 

P ain Timed, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 

Roll and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge . 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 07 07% 

Domestic " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt.casks 07% 

Part casks 07' 4 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 05 05' 4 

Bar, 1 lb 06'-, 

hoots. 2%lh« «q. ft., by roll 05% 

Sheets, 3to 6 lbs., ' 05 l / 2 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f o.b. Toron'o. 

Vote.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths ins at 7% cents. 



12*4 
87% 



$5 50 
5 75 
5 25 
b 00 


09 
>9 

07% 

06% 



Shot. 

Common, 86.50 per 10 lb ; chilled, 87.(0 
per 100 lb.; buck, stal and bal , $7.50. Die- 
count, 7y 2 pc Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil I'ipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on medium and extra 
heavy, and 45 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb 

Bar half-and-half 21% 2i% 

Refined 21 21% 

Wiping 20% 21 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities ol 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition . 

Antimony. 
Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Percwt 
Pure, Assoc. guarantee, ground in oil 

25 1b. irons 6 87'/. 

No. 1 do 6 50" 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5l» 

No. 4 do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 

Red Lead. 
Genuine, 560 lb casks, per cwt. ... 
Genuinn, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt. . 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 

No. 1, 1U0 lb. kogs, per cwt 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 

Pure White Zinc 08 

No. 1 06 

No. 2 05 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 J>0 

No. 1, kegs 6 00 

Prepared Paints 
In %. % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, per gallon 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 
Colors in Oil . 
25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 19 

Colors, Dry. 
Yellow Ochre ( J. C.) bbls .... 135 
Yellow Ochre (J. F.L.S.), bbls ... 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 

Brussels Ochre 

Venetian Red (best), percwt. 180 

F.nglish Oxides, per cwt 

American Oxides, per cwt . . 

Canadian Oxides, per cwt 

Super Magnetic Oxides. 93 p c. 
Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 

" Umber, " " 

do Raw 

Drop Black, pure 

Chrome Yellows, pure 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 

Ooldo,, fVhrp . ... 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb .... 



lh. 



1 25 
80 

o -1 
55 



1 20 
1 00 

85 

1 35 
1 20 
1 20 
1 10 



Mortar Color, per 100 lb . 

English Vermillion 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 

Whiting, per 100 lb 

Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying , per lb 07 

100-lb.lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or bis 2 25 

Hulk iu bbls., per 100 1 95 

Bulk in less quantities 2 10 

25-lb. tins, 4 in case 2 35 

12%-lb. tins, 8 in case 2 60 

Varnishes. 

(In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 8 00 9 00 

rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Cold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 

Elastic Oak 2 90 

Furniture, nl ra 2 40 

No. 1 1 60 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 

Light Oil Finish 3 V0 

Demar 3 30 

Shellac, white 4 40 

" orange 4 00 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 r;0 

Black Japan 2 40 

" No. 1 1 60 

Discount— general trade discount, 
cent and four months' time : .fecial cash 
. iBCount of 3 per cent in thirty days, or 3% 
per ceH. spot cash. 

The Imperial 
Varnish 4 Color 
Co's , Limited 
Elastilite Varnish, 
1 gal. can, each. 
82 0). 

Granatine Floor 
Finisli, per gal. 
82.00. 

Maple Leaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, COc. : 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each. 



2 80 

3 30 

2 80 
9. (0 

3 10 
3 m 

3 70 

4 80 
4 10 
2 CO 
2 8J 
2 00 
'0 per 




T«, 1^.., m.i VAQM1SK 



3 00 
1 75 

1 75 

2 00 



1 40 

2 75 

1 15 

2 00 

1 90 

3 25 

2 00 
2 00 
2 25 
10 
10 
09 
09 
18 
12 

033$ 



24 

1 00 

07 



Linseed OH. 

Raw Boiled 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 86 $0 89 

5 to 9 bbls " 85 

Montreal. Toronto. Hamilton, Quebec, 
London, Ottawa, Kingston and Guelnh 
2c. less. 

Turpentine. 
•Single barrel, freight allowed ... 71 

3 to t barrels " " 70 

Toronto, Hamilton, London, Guelph.2c. less. 

Castor Oil. 
East India, in cases, per lb.. 10 

" " small lots 10% 

Cod OH, Etc 

Cod Oil, per gal 50 

Pure Olive 

" Neatsfoot 

Glue. 

Common 

French Medal 14 14V, 

Cabinet.sheet 12 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 022 030 

8trip 18 20 

Coopers 19 JO 

Huttner 18 



11 
55 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 






EMERY 



Oloth 
Corn 

Flour 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, MOIltreal. 



HARDWARE. 

A 111 111 unit I on . 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Caps. Dom., 50 and 5 peroent. 
Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 45 p. c, Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Rim Fire, Military, net Hat, Amer. 
Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 18 P.O. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom- 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartr'dges, Sporting and Mili 

tarv, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
net list. B. B. Caps, discount 45 per cent. 
Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion" grides, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 and 10 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads. per lb. 

Besc thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags .. 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-ib.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of SCO each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wada, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wada, iu boxea of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7and8gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 115 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co. 'a Anvils.. lb. U9 09% 
Wilkinson & Co. 'a Vices., lb. 09% 10 

Augers. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 p.o. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axea, 40 and 15 p.c. 
Broad Axe3, 33% percent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 fi 00 

Boy'a Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 3 90 4 00 

Copper, discount 40 and 10 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

" " " 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

Tandem " A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 68% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', diaoount 27% Psr cent. 



Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net Hat. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, perpross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Norway Bolls, full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 50 

" " " full square... 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 52% 

Coach Screws 65 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Blank Bolts 52% 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Nuts, square 3%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4c. off 

Tapping Nuts 60 

Tire Bolts 60 

Stove Bolts 60 and 10 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 50 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% percent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred rooting, per 1U0 lb 1 60 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 80 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 CO 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in, 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Ballard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per groaa 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

Engliah " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulio 100 110 

Chalk. 
Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon , per gross 14 18 



Chisels. 

Socket. Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 

Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
Churns . 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8-- 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames — 20o. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, £8 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days, 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ootario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout. .. . 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Richelieu 4 75 

Emb. Richelieu 5 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round. 14 in 65 

" oval, 17x14 in 155 

" " 19x15 in 2 30 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33V3 per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.e.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. uet list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard, dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz 1 60 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 27% per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 per oent. to 60, 

10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent 
revised list. 

FRUIT PRESSES. 

Henis', per doz 3 25 3 50 

Shepard's Queen City, dis. 15 per cent. 
GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under 26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 00 

26 to 40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 .... 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 00 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 75 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 7 25 .... 14 CO 

91 to 95 15 50 

96 to 100 18 00 

101tol05 2100 

106toll0 24 00 

llltoll5 28 00 



GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 5u to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 

HALTERS. 
Rope, % per gross 



2 40 



to 3 4 



9 00 

14 00 

1 00 
5 20 

2 45 



Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, — per doz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 1 10 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., perlb.... 22 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 1 50 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft.run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft. run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" OKV. 



dis. 

1 20 

08V 

25 

2 00 

1 50 



1 25 
3 75 



5-in., 



06% 

06 

05% 

05% 



" 10-in., " 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pair 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 



brand 50 p.c. d 
brand 50 p.c. 



'■} 



Oval head. 



Acadian, ountersunk head and oval 
top, 50 au'l 10 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



3l 



THOS. FIRTH & SONS, Limited, SHEFFIELD 

fool Steel and Rock Drill Steel 

Tho sta 1n da c r an f . d r 3 P a a n S S ftftT/W... q ALWAYS CARRIED IN STOCK. 





H. W. DeCourtenay & Co. 

Sole Agents for Canada. 476 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 

43* Always Specify this BRAND When Ordering. ~<il> 




HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Moutreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller', 
Light, medium, and heavy. . 3 US 3 93 

8now shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 85 4 10 

Featherweight (all sizes) 5 10 5 10 

F.O.B Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Starperdoz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 27% p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door. japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knnbs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 11 per cent. 

IAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 50 

No. 3 " Wrights" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined 2 20 5 60 

Oalvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

LINES. 

Pish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis. 33' 3 p.c. 

Russell 4 Er win, per doz 3 05 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 
English and Am., per doz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 15 to 17% p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS 

Canadian, per doz 8 50 100 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 60 $4 10 

3d 3 25 3 77 

4and5d 300 360 

6and7d 2 90 3 45 

8and9d 2 75 3 25 

lOand 12d 2 70 3 23 

16 and 20d 2 65 3 15 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 60 3 10 

Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barral nails, dis 25 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 185 3 50 



NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 40 and 5 per cent, for McMullen's. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. 8. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Canada refined (Toronto) 13% 

Sarnia Water White 15 

Pratt's Astral 18 

Sarnia, Prime White 14 

American w. w 16% 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 1 25 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 10 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 1 50 3 00 

Brass head, " 40 100 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 55 per cent. 

American dis. 55. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 37% 

to 40 per cent. 
Bailey's (Stan. R. & L. Co.), 50 to 50 and 5 p.c. 
Miscellaneous, dis. 25 to 27% per cent. 
Bailey's Victor, 25 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 
English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 3714 
40 p.c. 

Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 

Impression work, discount, 60 per cent. 

Fullers work, discount 65 per cent. 

Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
cmint, 60 per cent. 

Jenkins' disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 

Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 

.Imkios radiator valves, discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis, 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valves, discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " •' 2 00 

No. 7. Fuller's 2 50 

No. 4%, '• 3 00 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

8crew 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS 

Canadian cistern 180 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 1 00 

RANOE BOILERS 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 7 25 

35 " 8 15 

40 " 9 25 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

'' 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable Canadian list dis. 

50 and 10 p.c revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 



7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 
%ia 

and 

m 



RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co. a rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 GO 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Carriage, Section, Wagon Box Rivets, etc., 

50 p.c. 
Black M. Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %e 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets * Burrs, 35 p.c. dis., and 

cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets in 

%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Burrs, iron or steel, 45 per cent. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 

9 l /s 13% 

. 10% 14% 

y^andS-lQin , 12 15% 

Cotton base, %-inch and 

larger ./ \2..^14'\i 15 

Russia Deep Se> "^rf 1S % 

Jute • "W- " 

Lath Yarn ....»♦ 9% 

New ealand Rope.fc. fk. .. 

RJTLES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p^ 

SAD IMfNS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polisflfed 

" No. 50, nickftsplated. 

Usual rebate on 12 afra 50 i ate lots.' 
SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint PapA 47% per 
B * A. sand, 40 arid 2%*er cen 
Emery, 40 per cant. 

SAT SPOflte. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, nfr doc 

SAWS.' J 
Hand, Disston's, dis. 12% p.*r v 
S. * D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 0"85y 55 

S. & D. , dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3 X 

Hack, complete, each 75 

" frame only 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 

Solid, " 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln,'' per doz 

SCALES 
Gurney Scales, 45 p.c. 
B. S. * M. Scales, 45 p.o. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.i 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c, 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 80 p.c 
Wood R. H., " dis. 75 p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 75 p.o. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 67%p.o. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 67% p.o. 
R.H. " 62% p.c. 

Drive Screws, 80 percent. 

Bench, wood, per doz. 3 25 

iron, " 4 35 

8CYTHES. 
Discount, per doz, net 9 CO 






SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS 
Bailey Cutlery Co. , full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Heinisch, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Seymour or Heinisch tailor shears. 15 p.c 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRON8. 

1, l%lb., perlb 37 

lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis., 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
lid iruicd, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 

STAPLES. 

Oalvanized 00 00 

Plain 00 3 45 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. ' 
Poultry netting staples, <0 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c 

STONE. Perlb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

slip, 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe o 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPE8. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

nch Per 100 lengths 8 00 

8 50 
IStove Polish. 




2 75 
75 



3 25 
1 50 



4 00 

5 75 



15 00 



No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash . . 
No. 6 — 3 dozen in case, " 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Per cent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 * 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80*12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued .80 * 5 

tinned 80 k 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . .75 & 15 

" % weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80* 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85 i 

" brush, blued* tinned, bulk. 70 
" gimp, blued tinned and 

japanned 75*12% 

Zinc tacks 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper mill 52% 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 



PITTSBURGH, 



MANUFACTURERS 

OF" 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Proof Coil. B.B., B.B.B.. Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties etc. 



ALEXANDER GIBB, 
Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec 



r, j- -o * *• A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Canadian Representatives— Montreal 



For other Provinces. 



>C>=y <±^* Vi-^ <Sc# 




* 



Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Pine finif hing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers — 90 and 10 
bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather ... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 2> p c. 
Same, H. & N., P. S. & W.. 65 do 
Same, steel, 72Vi, 75 p.c 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 

Wrapping, mottled, per pack. 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb 

Mattres8,per lb 

Staging, " 

Broom, " 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 

Bench, parallel, each 

Coach, each 

Peter Wright's, per lb 

Pipe, each 

Saw, per doz 



4 75 6 00 



50 
17 
33 
27 
30 

4 00 

2 00 
6 00 
12 

5 50 

6 50 



21 
60 
18 
45 
35 
55 

6 00 
4 50 

7 00 
13 
9 00 

13 00 



ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $3.00 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to. 5, ad 



yance7o. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9 base- 
No. 10, advance 7c- No. 11, 14c— No. 12, 
20c -No. 13, 35c— No. 14 47c— No 15, 
60c— No. 16.75c Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c. — special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
- — spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c- in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, inc.— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in . casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 15 per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-1K lots : No. 
17, $5- No. 18, 85.50- No. 19. $6-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, $7— No. 2i>, $7.30— No. 23, 
$7.65-No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
»9.50— No. 27, 810-No. 28 $ll-No 29. 
$12- No. 30, *13-No. SI, $14-No 32.815 
No. 33, $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire. Nos. 17-25 $2— Nos. 26-31. 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $3. Coppered, 5c- oil- 
ing, 10c. — in 25-1' . bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c — 
in Vt-lh. hanks, 75c- in '4-lb. hanks. $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c — bagging or 
papering, 10c 

GalvaoiredWire, per 100 lb.— No". 6, 7, 8, $3.95 
No. 9, $3.20— No. 10, $I.I0-No. 11, $4.15 
No. 12, $3 35- No. 13, $3.45-No. 14. 
$4 50-No. 15, $5.00-No. 16. $5.25. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 

per 1,000 feet 3 30 



fM DAMPERS 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B 
Galvanized, 4 barb, 2'A and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 25 

Galvanized barb, f.o.h. level »id. $2.95 in 
less than ca'lots, i nd $3.C5 in rarlots. 
Terms. 60 days nr 2 per cent, in 10 dayB. 

Ross braid truss cable 4 50 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. 2 00 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37'^ per cent. 
Agricultural. 60 p.c 
foe's Genuine, dis. 50 to 25 p.c 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 

G. & K '* Pipe, per doz 

Burrell s Pipe, each 

Pocket, per doz 25 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. 

. Royal Canadian 

Royal American 

Discount, 45 per cent.: terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 
Canadian make, discount, 25 per cent. 



7 00 
6 00 
3 40 
3 00 
2 90 



$60 00 
58 00 
50 00 



ESTABLISH 
I860 




Iron Dampers 



are neatly cast and have an attractive 
appearance. Easily put together. 

Cold handles and Encased Spring 

that will not burn out. 



Our "Empire" Dampers 



" Star," Cast Iron. 



are made of the best quality of Bes- 
semer steel, have all the advantages of 
cast iron dampers, as well as being light and lower in price. 

r o o r Empire," Sheet Steel. 

Coal Hods, Stove Boards, Fire Shovels, Stove Pipes, Elbows, Lanterns, Etc. 




THE TH0S. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



SEND for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthly Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new ana 
secondhand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established and most successful medium in the world. 
Established 86 yi-ars for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to thone who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference bj ■ large number 
of t"' r J,i. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
1 engineers and manufacturers Subscription. 
rice per copy, 6d. Sole Proprietor, I has. 
I M.E.. Newport, Mod., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mom. 



worm, anu is u»eu n 
of fl r Mf- It is con 
rnedah for all eiitti 
6s. per annum, pric 
D. Phillips, M.I ] 



WHY sharpen your bar of sleel? 
USE only "Aylmcr Drills." 
OLD fashioned drills waste time and money. 
WAYS change as inventions multiply 
Send for circular and prices to 
WM. J. CRAWFORD, 
Boom 39, Canada Life Building, MONTREAL. 

R C LeVESCONTE 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc 



The McKinnon Building 
Cor. Jordan and Melinda Streets 



TORONTO 



Telephone 689. 

Cable "LeVesconte" Toronto. 



To Cycle Makers 
and the Public: 

Notice is hereby given that J and 
H. M. Copeland's patented " Im- 
provements in Sprocket Wheel 
Clutches," No. 61918, Free Wheel 
Device, can be obtained from 

The Wortman and Ward Manufacturing Co, 

Limited 
LONDON, ONTARIO, CANADA 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO. 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, 
and endorsed " Tender for Supplying Coal for the 
Dominion Buildings," will be received at this office until 
Tuesday, 24th July, 1900, inclusively, for the supply 
of Coal for the Public Buildings throughout the Dominion. 
Combined specification and form of tender can be ob- 
tained at this office, where all necessary information can 
be had on application- 
Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not be 
considered unless made on the printed form supplied and 
^_ £/ signed with their actual signatures. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted' bank 
cheque made payable to the order of the Honourable the 
Minister of Public Works, equal to ten per cent, of 
amount of the tender, which will be forfeited if the party 
decline to enter into a contract when called upon to do so, 
or if he fail to complete the work contracted for. If the 
tender be not accepted the cheque will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. 

By order, 

JOS. R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 1 
Ottawa, June 28th, 1900. ( 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity from the Department will not be paid for it. (29) 



73 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1823. 



73 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, < 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S:SONS CO. Ka v rK.?. ff /; c s e :a 90 Ch ' mbe " st 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



CHAS. F, CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Trea»ur 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1, 5GO,O0O. Offices throughout the civilised world. 

Executive Offices : 346 and 348 Broadway, New Tork City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers lnfo»matlon that reflects the financial cond it Ion and the con- 
trolling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, by the 
merchants, tor the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort is spared, and do 
reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters affectlnf 
commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It furnishes 
Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciaiy and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its omces. Correspondence Invited. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY 



Toronto Office : Cor. Melinda and Jordan Sts. 
Hamilton Office : No. 39 James Street South. 
London Office : No. 365 Richmond Street. 



Winnipeg Office : No. 398 Main Street. 
Vancouver Office: Cor. Hastings and Hamilton Ste. 
Victoria Office : Board of Trade Building. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen.-Mgr., Western Canada, Toronto, Ont. 




E. B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticks 

PRESTON, 

Ontario, - Canada. 

The Best Stick. 
Made of Rock Elm. 
Wholesale|Trade Only Supplied. 
Ask your Wholesale House for 
Che Preston make of Stick. 
Write for Prices. 



ROUND RE-ACTING 
WASHER 



Quickest selling Washing Machine on the 

market. 
None more satisfactory to dealers or users. 
Even- home requires a good Washing 

Machine. 
Every Merchant should handle them. 
Prices and full particulars on application. 



THE . . 



Dowsiell Manufacturing Co. 

, Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Son, 
Montreal, Que. 




"•*%'%'%'%'%*'^%'<*%'V%''W%/%'%%/%/%/%/%/*%.'< 



•t.1968 




Inc. 1895 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

-* ^ *">■ 




THERE ARE A DOZEN DIFFERENT KINDS OF 

SOLID RUBBER TIRES 



FOR CARRIAGES. 



£ 



Ninety per cent, of all the 
Rubber Tires in use in New 
York City are the 

"Kelly- 
Springfield." 

WHY? 




PATENTED. 



Manufactured by 



The Gutta Perch a and Rubber Mfg. Co. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 

61-63 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO, ONT. 

Factories— 115-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



Ingot Tin, 

"B/VNCA" 

Ingot Tin, 

"LAMB & FLA6" 

Ingot Copper, 
Zinc Spelter, 
Sheet Zinc, 
Antimony, 
Pig Lead. 

From Stock and to Import. 

Enquiries Solicited. 



B.&S.H. THOMPSON &C0'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 



(WWWWWWV^'WWWVWW 



Galvanized corrugated sheets 

"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



<WWWWWWWWWV« «*/W«. 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



...Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Gauge and Lubricator Glasses, 

Langfwell's Manufacture, 

Montreal. 



e^CAMABlTARf* 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 28, 1900. 



NO. 30 



"TANDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. " 



Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
Tne Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed, 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH & McNAUOHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of A nti- Friction Queen Victoria St.. London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




the QUEEN'S th. HEAD 

OF THE EMPIRE 



AND 



Queen's Head 

IS THE BEST IRON USED 
IIS THE EMPIRE. 





CLLLZ&S 


c 


. _ •_• ■ ■ ■ *» 


IB 


'fffff'L- 



CANADA 



BRISTOL, ENG . 
and MONTREAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, LIMITED^-"* 

A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, MONTREAL. 




PROSPERITY 



S'W^c^^- 



o 



(hs^ I One thing is certain — the contractor who installs The 
Safford Radiators wins the confidence of those whom he deals 
with. " Confidence begets success," and success means " pros- 
perity." The " Safford " is the original invention in screw- 
threaded nipple connections for Steam and Hot Water heating 

— all others are imitators. The " Safford " cannot leak, 

because there are no rods, bolts or packings. 

Think of the damage to a contractor's reputation that the 
installation of leaky radiators can do ! 



The Safford Radiators 



have been recommended 
by the leading architects in the country — they have been installed in the largest 
public buildings — they have received the highest awards at all public exhibitions 
since the World's Fair. We have a free illustrated booklet which we would like to 
send you, because we believe that there is "prosperity " ahead for every contractor 
or dealer who will read it. Every statement in the booklet is backed up by the 
largest Radiator manufacturers under the British flag — 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Fishing Tackle 



♦♦««»♦>♦♦<>» 



TROLLING LINES 
RODS and REELS 
BAIT PAILS 
HOOKS 
LANDING NETS 
DISGORGERS, Etc. 



Sporting Goods 



KMHIHU I 



BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

GOLFING 

TENNIS 

CRICKET 

QUOITS 



S 
U 

P 
P 

L 
I 

E 
S 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 

Cor. King and Victoria Sts., 



IN 






& 



THE 



r 

£ 



Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 



OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 



^ Manufacturers of . . . 

§ fiar /row awtf Sfee/ 

| Nails, Spikes 

| r/orse Shoes . . 

I fio/ts, Washers, etc. 



\ 



Belleville, 
Ontario. 



3 
3 



s? _ 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



THRESHING 
BELTS 





with these brands 
insure the best 
of wear for the 
money. 



The Canadian Rubber 
Co. of Montreal, 



MONTREAL, y^Jffify^ 
TORONTO, ^g* + Otf 
WINNIPEG. "*&l> «/mkV> d^"' 



SOME OF THE NEWER "VANI/CC"" THHI Q 

i^lliiXLL wwl-O 




No. 15 "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT AND LEFT HAND, AND RIGID, WITH FINGER TURN ON BLADE— 2, 3, 4 and 5-in. BLADES. 





ftll SPIRAL SCREW DRIVER I X) 




No. 20 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT HAND ONLY, AND RIGID. 3 SIZES, EXTREME LENGTH OPEN, INCLUDING BIT— 14, 17 and 19-inches. 

Sold by Leading Jobbers NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

throughout the Dominion. Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you experience difficulty with other twine, 

try "Plymouth." 



TRADE 




MARK 



it 



THE STAMP OF EXCELLENCE." 



HARVEST TIME. 



We can fill repeat orders with great promptness, as we have Binder 
Twine stocks at London, Toronto and Ottawa. 

Order as you sell, every day, and telegraph (expose) when in a hurry. 



Distributo 



- : PLYMOUTH BINDER TWINE AGENCY, 



54 Bay St., 
...TORONTO 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



We carry In stock a full line of the following goods : 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes 

Canada Plates. 
Copper — Bar and Ingot. 

Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 

Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 
Copperine and Babbitt. 
Cotton Waste. 
Crucibles. 

Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 
Glue — English and French. 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 

Galvanized, 'Gordon" Crown and "Apollo," 

Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 
Iron Pipe— Black and Galvanized. 
Lead— Bar, Pig and Sheet. 
Lead Pipe. 

Solder— Half and Half and Standard. 
Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 
Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 
Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, "L. & F." and Straits. 
Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 
Zinc— Sheets and Block. 

PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ICE CREAM 



The Latest 
and Best. 



The 
'.'Ideal 



99 



will make cream in two 
to five minutes, accord- 
ing to quantity. 

SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 
VERY RAPID 
ECONOMICAL 



Write for Circular and 
Prices. 




Wnnd, VallRnr.fi ^r,n., Hamilton, out. 



Branch House : George D. Wood & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto Office : 88 York Street— H. T. Eager. 




WOOD. VALLANCE A CO.. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



GEO. D. WOOD & CO., 

Iron Merchants 

Importers of British and Foreign 

ARDWARE. 

WINNIPEG, Canada 



CORDAGE . . 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



o 



Manila Rope 


Tarred Hemp Rope 


Lathyarn 


Spunyarn 


Sisal Rope 


White Hemp Rope 


Shingleyarn 


Pulp Cord 


Jute Rope 


Bolt Rope 


Bale Rope 


Lobster Marlin 


Russian Rope 


Hide Rope 


Lariat Rope 


Paper Cord 


Marline 


Halyards 


Hemp Packing 


Cheese Cord 


Houseline 


Deep Sealine 


Italian Packing 


Hay Rope 


Hambroline 


Ratline 


Jute Packing 


Fish Cord 


Clotheslines 


Plow Lines 


Drilling Cables and 


Sand Lines 


"FIRMUS" 


Transmission Rope from the finest 


quality Manila hemp obtainable. 




Orders will 


not be accepted for second quality c 


ir "mixed" goods. 





CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



Toronto Branoh 27 FRONT ST. WEST. 
TEL. 94. Wm. B. Stewart, Agent. 



Montreal, Que. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Our 



MPERIAL OKFOR 

Represents the very highest development attained in 

range construction. 

Its patented improved features give it precedence over 
all others — and these improvements need only to be seen to be 
appreciated. 

ITS FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and handsome appearance are " taking points " that 
sell it everywhere. 

Are you handling them ? 

If not, write for our catalogue and price list — 
they are leading favorites all over Canada. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 




The Gurney=Massey Co., Limited, Montreal. 



AUER GASOLINE LAMP 



Money . . . 
back if 

not satis- 
factory. 

SEND FOR 
CATALOGUE. 

NO. 9. 



Approved by 

Can. Fire 
U'n'writers' 
Association. 

5 STYLES. 



Price - $11.00 




Auer Light Co., - Montreal 



...Defiance 

Cold 

Blast 

Lantern 




With Patent Fluted 

Plate, by which the air is 
admitted so as to come in 
contact with the Globe, so 
tending to keep it cool. 

* 

Sold by Leading 

Jobbers. 



Manufactured by. 



W. W. CHOWN <S CO. 



Belleville, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LEADER SHELLS LOADED WITH S.S. POWDER HAVE NO EQUAL. 




f f SMOKELESS ^V 



*A 




^^ SMC 

•Ok ^^ 



SMOKELESS S. SJSPORTINC 




FOR SHOT CUNS__^^ 

"£^&££2£^I 95/7/, 

SMOKELESS —^ m ^~ 



TRY 




♦ 

X 

♦ 
♦ 



High 
Velocities. 

Extra Hardened. 
Double Waterproof. 
Reliable, Safe, No Jar. 
Hard Hitting. 



Low 

Pressures. 

The Powder of Powders 

for a 

Variable Climate. 



Long 
Range. 

Quick and Strong, with 
Perfect Combustion. 
The Favorite Powder. 
The Choice of Experts. 



As a SPECIAL INDUCEMENT, we will offer for this season only first quality 
loaded shells loaded with this powder at a lower price than any job shells 
and cheap smokeless powder. Write for prices and new gun catalogue. 



^VVMUtWVWMWMVWVM^UMI 



SOLE MANUFACTURERS 



the Smokeless Powder Company 



28 Gresham Street, LONDON, E.C. 



LIMITED 



t 



WORKS: BARWICK. HERTS. 
LEWIS BROS. & CO., Agents for Canada MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




• 



We are Sole Agents in Canada for 



HURD'S CELEBRATED AXES 

Send us a sample order. These are no higher in 
price than inferior makes. 



LEWIS BROS. & CO., *£S? MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



y4uaJtc4A> jop <r(p{#n/ Grades 



. . FULL STOCK 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE. 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by any one. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 




Sold by 
Jobber* 
ol . . . 

Hardware 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 



EXTENDED. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 

Hardwood CHARCOAL ,!■.;-::„'- 

WUUU ALOUnUL equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 

Manufactured only by.. 

THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., limited 

■>.c„,,i..{ £"£;£»■• Gooderham Building, TORONTO 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 

"MAXWELL FAVORITE CHURN" 

PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand- 
Boiler Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive. 




L 



High and Low Wheels, 
from 12-in. to 20-in. 
1 1 widths. Cold Rolled 
Steel Shafting, Cruci- 
ble Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 



WHEELBARROWS, 



In Four different sizes. 



Steel Frame Churn 



If your Wholesale House does not 
offer you these articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 




MAXWELL MOWER 



8-inch Low Wheel. 



'ism* c" "■ 

Wood Frame Churn. 

THE MAXWELL" Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




. , -, ...., 



iW»"™ ? """*°*.'«i .>. p . c . c n ', A A 



ia_V\ ! ^fl !Tl! Ss lH n i W B I 1 1 l|:: " '■■'¥■"" '& "■-."'"' li:: " :: &_££.«.: 





v wvy^ 



'..« , **" vdi «& ow ** c *«. 

CCtarrHntf&\£y.Supf r ior 

EATRA THIN BAC H 



^^^^ 




Everybody knows what Disstons' Saws are. 
Everybody will soon know what Disstons' Files are. 
They are both made on honor. 



Henry Disston & Sons 



INCORPORATED. 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 

A g*"' s ■ • MONTREAL. 



PHILADELPHIA, 



PA. 







Vol. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 28, 1900. 



No. 30 



President, 

|OHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North- West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES 

MONTREAL .... Board of Trade Building. 

Telephone H55 

TORONTO a6 Front Street West, 

Telephone 1148. 
LONDON, ENG. - - - - 109 Fleet Street, EX., 

J. M. McKim. 
MANCHESTER, ENG. - - - 18 St Ann Street, 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. 

I. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N. B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

I. Hunter White. 

NEW YORK. 150 Nassau Street, 

Edwin H. Haven. 

Travelling Subscription Agents : 
T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 

dubaoription Canada, 82.00 Great Britain, $3.00 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address I ^ sctip \' ^° ad ° D 
1 Adscript, Canada. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIRADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



THE TROUBLES OF ST. JOHN. 

A CONFERENCE was held in St. 
John, N.B., on Friday, between the 
representatives of the board of trade 
of that city and President Shaughnessy, of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway. The motive 
■ *c the conference was railway facilities for 
the winter port. 

It will be remembered that early last 
winter, because of the failure of the Cana- 
dian Pacific and the Intercolonial to arrive 
at an agreement satisfactory to the former, 
it looked as if the winter port of St. John 
would suffer severely. And, were it not for 
the persistency and energy of the business 



men of St. John, it would undoubtedly have 
suffered severely. 

But the agreement then arrived at was 
only a patched-up affair, and was, conse- 
quently, only of a temporary character. 
Consequently, the differences that then 
existed between the Canadian Pacific and 
the Government railway still exist, and have 
to be removed, if the people of St. John are 
to escape the decidedly unpleasant circum- 
stances that so alarmed them last year. 

It is evident from the tone of Mr. Shaugh- 
nessy's remarks at the conference on Friday 
last, that the Canadian Pacific is in no 
humor to parley. The Government had 
dealt more generously with the Grand 
Trunk than it had with the Canadian 
Pacific, and, unless matters were evened up 
in this respect, the Canadian Pacific would 
not be able to give the desired through 
freight rates on goods for export by way of 
St. John. This was in effect the burden of 
his contention. This, of course, is the 
ciux of the whole question : If railway 
freight rates on goods are not as favorable 
by way of St. John as by other ports, of 
course goods will be exported by other ports. 

While the Canadian Pacific may have a 
grievance with the Government road, yet 
there is a "stand and deliver" air about 
Mr. Shaughnessy' s remarks that is not 
pleasant. By implication, at least, he told 
the people of St. John that they must help 
his company to get "better terms " out of 
the Government. The fact is that the Cana- 
dian Pacific has been aided from the 
Dominion treasury to a far greater extent 
than any other railway system. And when 
Mr. Shaughnessy talks as he did at St. 



John, this fact is forcibly brought to one's 
remembrance. But the Canadian Pacific 
apparently has the whip hand, and it is to 
be hoped that some means will be devised 
to prevent the threatened blow falling upon 
the shipping trade of St. John. 

It is, after all, a sad commentary on the 
railway conditions in Canada when the 
weal or woe of an industry like that of the 
shipping trade of St. John should depend on 
the ipse dixit of one or more railway com- 
panies. And especially when, as in the 
present instance, foreign ports like Boston 
and Portland stand to largely gain what St. 
John may lose. 

Tne question should not merely concern 
the city of St. John ; it should concern the 
whole country. 

REDUCTION IN THE PRICE OF 
BOLTS. 

A RATHER unexpected reduction has 
taken place in the price of Nor- 
way, carriage, plough and machine 
bolts and coach screws. The reduction is 
approximately from 10 to 15 per cent. 
The new prices are as follows : 

Norway bolls, full square 65 per cent. 

Common carriage bolts, full square. . 65 

5-15 & under 60 

" HS: larger.. 55 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe bolts 75 

Blank bolts 60 

Bolt ends 65 

Plough bolts 55 

Nuts, square 4c. 

Nuts, hexagon 4J<c. 

It will be noticed that a change has also 
been made in the method of quoting 
common carriage bolts. 

Business in bolts is fair, although not as 
active as it was. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS MEN AND POLITICS. 



WITHIN the next 12 months, the 
business men of Canada will be 
called upon to aid in the election of 
another Parliament. 

A Parliament representing any one class 
we do not want. What we want, and what 
we need, is a businesslike Parliament, what- 
ever its political complexion may be. 

The agitation this paper has been carry- 
ing on for the past few years is bearing fruit. 
There is a decided and growing opinion 
among the people of this country, and espe- 
cially among the mercantile class, that the 
thing most to be desired in a member of 
Parliament is not his political beliefs, but the 
measure of common sense he has at his 
command. 

It is true that the present Parliament is 
characterized more by its lack than by its 
possession of the quality of business com- 
mon sense. But, far as it is from being the 
ideal, it is better than its predecessor. 

The claim of the Government for its being 
retained in office is not now based upon 
faithfulness to the tenets of the Liberal 
party. It is based upon its faithfulness to 
business principles. It likes to style itself a 
Cabinet of business men. 

The Opposition, on the other hand, no 
longer claim that the Government should 
be turned out of power because its political 
economy is unsound. What it attempts to 
combat is its claim to the possession of the 
quality of business. "This is what the 
Cabinet of alleged business men has done," 
is in effect a phrase one frequently hears 
sarcastically applied by the Opposition press 
and people. 

We are not venturing an opinion as to the 
merits or demerits of the claim of the one or of 
the assertions of the other. We are merely 
pointing out the existence of certain conditions 
in support of our contention that the opinion 
is growing that business common sense is 
of more importance in a member of Parlia- 
ment than political professions. 

Naturally this opinion obtains more among 
the business men of the country than among 
any other class, but even among the 
majority of these the influence of party is 
still stronger than the influence of business 
common sense. 



Business men owe nothing to party. It 
is only the rare one that secures an office 
of whom there is the least ground for saying 
that he owes anything to party. 

Men will always have their political 
belief, and will always sympathize more 
with the tenets of one party than they will 
with those of another. There is nothing to 
be said against that. But a great deal is to 
be said against being so wedded to party 
that you slavishly follow wherever it chooses 
to lead, be the course according to or con- 
trary to business common sense. 

Good government never was and never 
will be secured by such methods. And it 
is good government the business men of 
this country should be concerned about, for 
its existence or non-existence is of more 
importance to them than to any other class 
in the country. 



THE IRON TRADE SITUATION. 

PRICES and strikes are the disturbing 
factors in the iron trade across the 
boundary line. 

In Pittsburg, the price of pig iron is 50c. 
to $1 per ton lower than it was a week ago. 
Steel bars have dropped to within $2 per 
ton of the lowest price of 1897, while, 
according to Iron Trade Review, raw 
materials and labor represent fully $5 a ton 
advance over the basis of three years ago. 

The iron market is gradually becoming 
more favorable to buyers, but there are 
indications that it will be even more so. At 
the same time, however, the market has 
arrived at a stage where it would not take a 
great deal of influence to impart a little 
more confidence to it. 

Material is wanted. Buyers will not, 
however, pay the prices, but there is a feel- 
ing that values will not have to go a great 
deal further in order to anive at a normal 
condition. 

One of the by no means least unsatis- 
factory features of the iron trade situation in 
the United States is the labor troubles. 
The moulders in 17 foundries in Cleveland 
have been on strike since early in the 
month, and the end is not in sight. So far 
the victory appears to lean towaids the 
employers, for the forces at work in the 
shops are gradually increasing. Then there 



is likely to be trouble over the bar iron and 
puddling scales, the workers having de 
manded an advance of 10 per cent, in the 
base rate, iron Trade Review points out 
that that this would raise the minimum 
market price 1.40c. to 1.50c, though fhe 
market has already gone $6 a ton below 
that price, and it claims that the manufac- 
turers, under such circumstances, art^ot 
at all likely to accord any such advance. 

In Canada, everybody has settled down 
to a hand-to mouth business, and is pre- 
pared to await developments. Stocks of 
hardware are in a healthy condition, as 
there is a steady sorting-up letter-order 
trade. There are indications that the fall 
trade will be fairly brisk. 



HOLIDAYING HARDWAREMEN. 

THIS is the holiday season in the whole- 
sale hardware trade. Managers, in 
some instances, and travelers in 
many, are taking their customary vacation, 
catching fish, or collecting "yarns" re- 
garding the same, or quietly resting at some 
holiday resort gathering energy. 

Most of them, at any rate, have earned 
their holiday, for, while there is not the 
activity there was a short time ago, the 
pa^t 12 months have been busy ones for 
everyone who allowed himself to be in- 
fluenced by the spirit of the times. 

Hardware and Metal hopes that those 
who are taking their holidays, or are about 
to do so, will return with new vigor for 
business, and that the fall trade will be of 
such a character that they may be kept 
hustling to keep up with it. 



A FALLACIOUS IDEA. 

There are men in the political world who 
seem to be possessed of the idea that by 
following a crooked career they are travel- 
ing on the shortest and straightest road to 
success. 

The business men should show them that 
it is the shortest and straightest road to 
oblivion. 



THE MIDLAND FURNACE. 

It is expected that the new iron furna^" 
of The Canada Iron Furnace Co., Limited, 
at Midland, will be in operation in two or 
three weeks, w-ien about 150 tons of pig 
iron per day will be turned out. 

The Lake Superior mines will furnish the 
ore. Pig iron wiil be the only product at 
present. 

About 400 men will be employed about 
the furnaces and on the wharves. 



' 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



LAWS, NEW AND AMENDED. 



THE business results of the late session 
of Parliament embody several matters 
which the commercial community 
will find it useful to know. 

FINANCE. 

In the realm of finance, there is the 
.jj-^isure providing that the whole or any 
part of the public debt may be inscribed 
and transferred in a registered copy in Great 
Britain. This is in accordance with the 
provisions of the Imperial Act which enables 
the debts of colonies to be admitted to the 
list ol inscribed stocks in England. A more 
important measure is the Act amending the 
Bank Act. This law continues the charters 
of 34 incorported banks, and provides that 
the Jacques Cartier Bank may change its 
name to the Provincial Bank of Canada, 
and the Merchants Bank of Halifax to the 
Royal Bank of Canada. A clause provides 
that persons holding bank stock in trust 
shall not be personally liable as a share- 
holder. Several other provisions growing 
out of the failure of certain banks of Canada 
during the last few years, and doubtless 
suggested by these occurrences, are made. 
For instance, arrangements are made for 
the appointment of a curator in the event of 
a bank suspending. Then, again, the 
Canadian Bankers' Association is recog- 
nized and its powers defined. The by-laws 
of the Bankers' Association are not to go 
into force until they are approved of by 
the Treasury Board of the Canadian Govern- 
ment. There are also provisions for the 
purchase of the assets of a bank. 

THE TARIFF. 

No tariff changes were made in detail at 
the late session, but, as is well known, the 
preferential rate on British goods was 
increased to > 3 of the duty. But this prefer- 
ential rate does not apply to wines, malt 
liquors, spirits, liquid medicines, and 
articles containing alcohol, tobacco, cigars 
and cigarettes. Besides that, the reduction 
will only apply to refined sugar when the 
Minister of Customs is furnished with satis- 
factory evidence that such refined sugar has 
been manufactured wholly from raw sugar 
produced in the British colonies. 

It is provided also that machinery not 
made in Canada and for use in beet-root 
— *€ugar factories may be imported free. 

RULES REGARDING FRUIT BARRELS, ETC. 

The regulations of the Inland Revenue 
Department have been amended in several 
particulars relating to weights and measures. 
For example, it is provided that the barrels 
containing apples for export shall be of the 
following dimensions, viz.: 26)^ inches 
between the heads, inside measure, and a 
head diameter of 17 inches, and a middle 



diameter of i8>£ inches, representing as 
near as possible 96 quarts. These dimen- 
sions shall also apply to barrels when apples, 
pears or quinces are sold by the barrel. 
The penalty for disobeying this law is 25c. 
for each barrel of apples, pears or quinces 
offered or exposed for sale or packed. 

Another provision is that when eggs are 
described by the standard dozen, the dozen 
shall mean i^lb. 

Every ball of binder twine is to be stamped 
with the name of the maker or importer, 
stating the number of feet of twine per lb. 
in such ball. The penalty for disobeying 
this section is 25c. per ball. This section 
relating to binder twine does not come into 
force until October 1, 1900. 

COPYRIGHT. 

The passage of an Act giving copyright 
to Canadian publishers of English books 
whose owners make an arrangement with 
local publishers has been passed without 
amendment. 

CHINESE IMMIGRATION. 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier's Act restricting Chinese 
immigration also passed. This is a measure 
of considerable interest to people in British 
Columbia. The Government, by it, are 
given power to appoint one or more persons 
to administer the Act and engage inter- 
preters at salaries aggregating not more 
than S3, 000 a year. Under the Act, only 
members of the Chinese diplomatic corps 
or other Government representatives, with 
their suites and servants, and consuls and 
consular agents may enter without paying 
the fee. Others who escape the tax are 
Chinese children, born in Canada, who 
have left this country for educational or 
other purposes and establish their identity 
on returning ; also merchants, their wives 
and children, tourists, men of science, and 
students who substantiate their status to 
the satisfaction of the authorities. 

Any woman of Chinese origin who is 
married to a person not of Chinese origin 
shall come in free, being deemed to be of 
the same nationality as her husband. 

The Act also contains provision regarding 
the landing of Chinese and certain regula- 
tions to prevent any introduction of disease. 
Another section prohibits the traffic in 
Chinese women. A penalty is imposed for 
landing the Chinese before the tax is paid. 
Rules are also given for the passage of 
Chinese through Canada in transit to some 
other country, and provision is made for 
the registration of those who leave Canada 
and wish to return. 

Any Chinese who break the new law may 
be put in prison for a year or be subject to 



a fine of $500. The organization of Chinese 
cour 1 is prohibited. 

CRIMINAL l.AWS. 

The Criminal Code has rec eived a number 
of amendments, the subjects dealt with being 
chietly the publication of indecent books, 
photographs, etc., the offence of kidnapping, 
counterfeiting money, etc. 

Slight changes are also made in the laws 
regarding theft, and certain procedure in 
the case of accused persons. The changes 
are more technical than comprehensive 
and of more interest to the legal community 
than the commercial classes. 

ARBITRATION OF LABOR DISPUTES. 

The last measure to which attention may 
be directed is the Act passed to aid in the 
prevention and settlement of trade disputes, 
and to provide for the publication of statis- 
tical industrial information. By this 
measure boards are established for the pur- 
pose of settling disputes between employers 
and workmen by conciliation or arbitration. 
The law follows the English Act to a cer- 
tain degree, and provides for the creation of 
an arbitration tribunal when the disputing 
parties are willing. The Act is not obliga- 
tory, and has no power, therefore, to 
terminate a strike. 

In connection with this, the Act sets up a 
Department of Labor which shall collect and 
publish statistical and other information 
relating to the conditions of labor, and issue, 
at least once a month, a publication known 
as The Labor Gazette, containing informa- 
tion regarding the labor market and kindred 
subjects. 

As already announced through the press, 
the Government have appointed as editor 
of this new paper Mr. William Lyon 
Mackenzie King, M.A., LL.B., at present 
on the staff of Harvard University and a 
distinguished graduate of the University of 
Toronto. Mr. King is not a politican, but 
has been engaged in journalistic work and 
in special inquiries into conditions of labor 
for several years. 

In connection with the work of the 
session, it might be mentioned that the 
Minister of Customs, Mr. Paterson, took a 
vote of money for the purpose of providing 
a staff to publish promptly and fully the 
trade statistics relating to imports and ex- 
ports. This will be put into shape at once, 
beginning with the present month, which is 
the first of the new fiscal year. 



The Maritime Hardware Association met 
at Digby, N.S., on Wednesday, Thursday 
and Friday of this week. 

There is a movement to organize a com- 
pany in Gait, Ont., for the manufacture of 
galvanized ware, pumps, piping, etc. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW FIREARMS ARE TESTED. 

THE Government testing of all firearms 
manufactured in Belgium is of more 
importance than is generally recog- 
nized, for it does away almost entirely with 
accidents caused by the bursting of guns in 
the hands of sportsmen, and prevents 
manufacturers imposing dangerous and 
worthless guns on the public. The test of 
the cheap double barrel breech-loading 
shotgun manufactured in Belgium, and sold 
abroad for 30s., is just as thorough and 
complete as the one that sells for ,£30, and 
the same is true of all the guns made in that 
country. 

Liege being the leading firearms manu- 
facturing city in the world, it has the most 
extensive as well as the most complete 
proving station. The Government has 
provided very strict rules and regulations to 
govern it, and the director, Mr. Jules Polain, 
is very jealous of its reputation. 

The law of the land makes it a crime to 
sell, offer for sale, or to be found in posses- 
sion of a gun, pistol or any kind of firearm 
not bearing the proper Government test 
marks, or a gun of a different calibre than 
that stamped on the barrel ; the fine is not 
less than 50 francs nor more than 100 
francs, and the arm in question is con- 
fiscated. 

It is also a crime severely punished for 
anyone to put any testing marks on fire- 
arms, or even to mark the calibre, to add 
the words " choke bored," or anything of 
a similar character. 

Single-barrel muzzle-loading shotguns are 
tested but once, while a double barrel is 
tested twice. A single-barrel breech-load- 
ing shotgun is tested twice, while a double- 
barrel is tested three times. The guns 
having more than one test have the barrels 
tested before they are fastened together, and 
again when breechlock is finished. In all 
cases at least double the usual charge of 
powder is used, and that of an extra fine 
quality, which is carefully tested three times 
each ; and one-third more shot is used than 
ordinarily. 

The loss by testing varies from 1 to 5 per 
cent. ; the largest percentage of loss is in the 
higher priced and lighter guns. The same 
quality of steel is used for all barrels, but the 
difference comes in the workmanship and 
weight. 

The cost of testing is paid by the 
manufacturer, and is 1 franc for the three 
tests. 

To give an idea of the growth cf the fire- 
arms industry in Liege, Mr. Winslow, the 
American Consul, says that the total 
number of tests made at the proving station 



for the past three years were: In 1897, 
1,712,809 ; in 1898, 1,968,708, and in 1899, 
2,238,326 ; showing in two years an increase 
of 525 526 tests. 



CHEAPNESS 



AVERY erroneous idea appears to be 
common as to what constitutes 
"cheapness." The word is too 
frequently treated as if it was a convertile 
term with low price. But because things 
are low-priced it does not at all follow that 
they are cheap. There are many low- 
priced articles that are dear at any price. 
This is an axiom that should be borne in 
mind by all purchasers of goods. On the 
other hand, cheapness does not necessarily 
indicate poor quality, as some affect to 
believe. Low-priced or cheap goods are a 
necessity. Everyone is not able to buy the 
best goods that are made ; consequently, 
articles have to be produced to suit slim 
purses. In most lines, however, such goods 
can be made in an honest and serviceable 
manner, though perhaps not with the fine 
finish of the more expensive goods, and be 
really cheap. 

Cheapness is a positive term. Things 
that are cheap may either be a bargain — 
that is, intrinsically worth more than is 
asked for them — or they may be merely 
well worth the price paid. An inferior or 
poor article is never really cheap to the 
buyer. For example, a man may buy a 
$10 suit of clothes that will last him but one 
season, whereas, for $5 more, he might buy 
a suit that will be good for two seasons' 
wear. Or another may roof his house with 
low-priced tinplate, thinly coated, and his 
roof will wear out and have to be renewed 
in a very few years, whereas the purchase 
for the purpose of heavier coated plate, 
costing perhaps half as much again, would 
insure him a serviceable roof covering for 
three times as long. 

In either case the more expensive article 
is the cheapest ultimately. In this respect 
the poor are placed at a material dis- 
advantage. They are compelled to buy 
"cheap" goods which are generally pocr 
goods and which do not last as long, and 
consequently are the dearest in the end, al- 
though the first cost was less. But those 
who can afford to buy goods of good quality 
and yet deliberately purchase inferior 
material, simply because it is lower in price, 
are, to say the least, displaying mighty 
poor judgment and are certainly not 
getting their goods cheaply. It would do 
no harm for retailers to try and educate 
their customers along this line, especially 
as it is always the rule that " cheap" goods 
rre sold at the slimmest margin of profit to 
the merchant. 



SUPPLIES OF IRON. 

" A good deal of anxiety has been felt 
during the last two years as to the available 
supplies of iron ores and fuel. The total 
world's consumption of iron ores in 1899 
was probably more than 90 000,000 tons. 
Of this quantity," says a writer in The 
Engineering Magazine, " the United States 
contributed more than 22,000,000 tons. 
But in all countries alike very exceptifr" 1 
efforts were made to increase the output so 
as to overtake the greatly-stimulated de- 
mand. These efforts are still being con- 
tinued. Spain has been ransacked from 
one end to the other in order to increase the 
available supplies. France is opening up 
new sources of supply in Greece, North 
Africa and elsewhere. The Germans have 
sought to acquire almost a monopoly of the 
supply of Swedish Lapland — within the 
Arctic circle — for a number of years to 
come, and have concluded arrangements 
which point to their belief that iron ores are 
likely to become increasingly scarce. This 
is a very general apprehension, and if it is 
justified by the facts, then it seems to be 
probable that this condition may mainly 
determine future supremacy. In the war of 
commerce and industry it is conceivable 
that Providence may, in the future, seem to 
interpose on behalf of the nation that has 
the largest available supplies of cheap iron 
ores." 



Thieves entered the hardware store of 
Davis & Rowland, Clinton, Ont., last Sat- 
urday night, and stole $30 or $40 worth of 
razors, knives, etc. 

Westman Brothers, Chatham, have moved 
into their fine large new premises — 36 x 195 
feet — where they display their stock to 
advantage, and report business quite satis- 
factory. 

F. J. Marshall, hardware merchant, 
Orangeville, Ont., has purchased the stock 
and business of J. J. Kelly, who has also 
been engaged in the hardware trade. It is 
reported that Mr. Marshall's intention is to 
amalgamate the two stores. Mr. Kelly 
intends moving to Toronto. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmen'u 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

THOMAS BURNSIDE, general mer- 
(hant. Bothwell, Ont., has assigned 
in S. J. Thomas ; creditors meet 
July 28 

Mrs. Francois Dumas, hardware dealer, 
Quebec, has assigned. 

The creditors of J. W. A. David, hard- 

~Zyt merchant. Montreal, met on July 27. 

V. E. Paradis has been appointed curator 

for H. Boily, general merchant, Sayabec, 

Que. 

Carley & Studer, general merchants. 
Morden, Man., have assigned to C. H. 
Newton, Winnipeg, Man.; creditors meet 
July 26. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

The Bedford Stove Co., Bedford, Que , 
has dissolved ; H. Hulburd continues. 

Jenkins Bros., general merchants, Smith's 
Mills, Que., have registered partnership. 

McNeill & McFarlane, hardware and 
lumber merchants. Snowflake, Man., have 
dissolved. Donald B McNeill continues. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

P. W. Lipka, carriagemaker, Neepawa, 
Man., has sold out. 

T. Race, blacksmith, Niverville, Man., 
advertises his business for sale. 

T. C. Forbes, general merchant, Roth- 
well, Man., is selling out. 

W. F. Thornton, general merchant, 
Hartland, N.B., is selling out. 

J. E. Price, general merchant, Norton, 
N.B., has sold out to Elias Harmer. 

W. J. Reazin, hardware merchant, Pick 
ering, Ont., advertises his business for sale. 

R. B. Fisher, hardware merchant, Car- 
man, Man., has sold out to Buettner Bros. 

B. J. Smith, general merchant, Reston, 
Man., has sold out to John White & Sons. 

The assets of Elzear Gremier, general 
merchant, Murray Bay, Que., have been 
sold. 

W. J. Falconer, hardware dealer, Palm- 
erston, Ont., has sold out to Chalmers 
Bros. 

A. T. Davis, general merchant, Flet- 
wode, N.W.T., has sold out to E. C. 
Warner. 

The stock of Cyr & Guite, general mer- 
chants, New Carlisle, Que., was sold at 
— ^*7^c. on the dollar. 

The stock of Leblanc, Cyr & Guite, 
general merchants, Ruisseau, Que., was 
sold at 68 #c. on the dollar. 

The stock, etc., of R. Richardson & Son, 
general merchants, lumber, etc., Bedford, 
N S., was sold by sheriff on July 25. 

James Gill & Co., general merchants, 
Revelstoke, B.C., have sold out to Mc- 
Arthur & Harper, Kamloops, B.C. 



"ON THE FENCE.' 



You can't be " on the fence " in the matter 
of quality if you handle S W.P. 

You have to stand out unmistakably for 
ever) thing that's best. The high quality and 
good value of S-W.P. will pervade your whole 
business. 

And that's what makes the trade grow. The 
public put confidence in the man who stands 
for high quality. They like to buy where they 
know good things are sold. 

If you're not familiar with S-VV.P. and 
S-W.P. methods, write for our booklet "B 13.'' 
It tells all briefly. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 




CLEVELAND. 
CHICAOo 



NEW YORK 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 

TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCIS! o. 
KANSAS CITY. 




CHANGES. 

The Calcibide Gas Machine Co., Mont- 
real, have registered as incorporated. 

The Renfrew Power Co., Limited, Ren- 
frew, Ont., have obtained a charter. 

Guion & Starratt, general merchants, 
Butternut Ridge, N.B. , have commenced 
business. 

E. Rolston (Mrs. A. W.), general 
merchant, Wellington, B.C., is removing 
to Ladysmith, B.C. 

Shera & Co.. general merchants, Fort 
Saskatchewan, N.W.T., will open a branch 
at Star, N.W T.. shortly. 

Julie Cloutier has registered proprietor of 
Wilbrum, Genereux & Co.'s general store, 
St. Jacques des Piles, Que. 

Yuen Chong & Chang Sew have regis- 
tered as proprietors of K wong Hang Chong' s 
general store, Vancouver, B.C. 

May A. Fairfield has registered as pro- 
prietress of H. Fairfield & Co., agents for 
carriages, etc., St. Johns, Que. 

The Maritime Engineering Works, Monc- 
ton, N.B., have commenced business. 

Mrs. Toussaint Audet Lapointe has re- 
gistered as proprietress of T. Lapointe, coal 
and wood dealer, Ste. Cunegonde, Que. 

FIRES. 

The Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., 
Toronto, were partially burned out ; insured. 



ANOTHER STEP-RIDER. 

E. W. Palfrey, well-known as one of the 
cleverest cyclists who perform at the prom- 
inent vaudevile houses, has added step- 
riding to his work. 

It is needless to remark, perhaps, that 
the dangers incident to this riding are great 
— consequently, but few riders care to 
attempt it. 

Mr. Palfrey rides this week at West End 
Park, New Orleans. A flight of steps built 
in the grounds reaches to the dizzy height of 
125 feet and down this narrow path the 
daring cyclist rushes, causing thousands of 
onlookers to hold their breath in amaze- 
ment at the whirlwind sped with which he 
descends. 

Palfrey rides an Iver Johnson and has 
confidence in it. Kilpatrick, another 
cyclist who has been riding the steps for 
several years, has never had an accident 
— he rides an Iver Johnson cycle too. 

Palfrey, who has just commenced step- 
riding, realizing the importance of a strong 
wheel, decided to buy an Iver Johnson, 
knowing that the same wheel has carried 
Kilpatrick safely. 

The wheels used by both riders are 
regular road wheels, fitted with very short 
and heavy tires. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRREE MONTHS IN TURPENTINE. 

THE first three months of the 1900 01 
naval stores year has witnessed high 
values for spirits turpentine, as fore- 
shadowed in our market and editorial 
reviews at the opening of the season, the 
range of prices at Savannah being 53^ to 
42c, the low price occurring duiing the 
latter half of June, and the high price being 
current April 1. Last year the range was 
42jto 35c, a difference of 11^ to 7c. The 
highest and lowest prices for each of the 
three months, as taken from the circular 
reports issued by the Savannah Board of 
Trade, are given below for this and last 

year : 

1900. 1899. 

Month. High. Low. High. Low. 

April 5354 46 42 38 

May 49 47 4* 39 

June 47^ 42 38 35 

One of our Savannah exchanges which 
follows the spirits market closely states that 
by the close of July half the crop will have 
been marketed, and that a decided falling 
off in receipts at all ports will be witnessed 
after that date. This is not encouraging to 
consumers who look for cheap spirits, but 
is in harmony with other conditions pro- 
phetically outlined in these columns. The 

COURSE OF THE MARKET SINCE APRIL I 

is interesting when presented in detail. The 
opening price as already indicated was 

S3/4 C - Tnls was an unusual fig ure f° r a 
time when the new crop was directly at 
hand, but the floods, blight, cold weather 
and other conditions that created such an 
abnormal value held the market firm at the 
price named for over a week, the first break 
of the season not coming until April 11, 
when there was a drop of i)4c., followed by 
others in quick succession, the market being 
49c. on April 13, and 46c. on April 16. A 
reaction then came, the market advancing 
temporarily to 47 j£c, the month closing at 
46^0. 

May was a month of advancing quota- 
tions. It opened at 46^c, against 4o^c. 
the previous season. The market was 
strong, and quoted between 47 and A7H C - 
until May 14, when it advanced to 49c, 
and closed the month at 48c, or 10c. higher 
than at the same time last year. The course 
of the market thus far had been all that 
producers could wish, the range of prices 
far exceeding expectations and surprising 
everybody. The unfavorable weather during 
the early spring and the dearth of stock 
abroad and in this country, creating a de- 
mand regardless of values, were responsible 
for the high prices that were paid for the 
free spirits that had thus far come out. 

June opened at 47 ^c. against 37c. in 
1899. Receipts had now become larger, 
and the Gulf ports were shipping to foreign 



sources, so that the European markets be- 
came better supplied. With'v 

THE DEMAND LESS URGENT 

from consumers, both in this country and 
abroad, they could afford to hold off for 
more satisfactory prices, and they did so. 
The market's tendency during this month 
was therefore downward. Before the middle 
of the month it had declined to 44c, and 
the outlook was for a further weakening ; 
43c. was soon reached, and on June 22 the 
market was quoted 42c, which, as already 
indicated, was the lowest price to this time 
for the season. In the last days of the 
month the market recovered a part of its 
loss, the situation in the producing districts 
becoming more unfavorable by reason of 
heavy rains and a scarcity of laborers. It 
advanced to 43>£c. where it closed. 

Regarding the future of prices, it may be 
said that much depends on the receipts. 
If, as many expect, they show a marked 
decrease for the first half of July it is the 
belief that values will be sustained and 
further advances occur. Up to July 1 the 
net increase in receipts over last year was 
about 13,000 barrels, with July only left to 
swell this figure. The receipts of the last 
eight months of the year are expected to 
counterbalance this increase, so that the 
higher values which have been maintained 
and are in prospect could be attributed al- 
most wholly to the more expansive demands 
of home and European consumers, should 
the output of the two years be approximately 
the same, as now seems likely. — Paint Oil 
and Drug Review, Chicago. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Henry Clucas, one of the representa- 
tives of The Canada Paint Co. in Ontario, 
is in Montreal, staying at the Balmoral 
Hotel. 

Messrs. T. G. Dexter and Ed. Whyte, 
manager and traveler respectively for H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co , Toronto, are holiday- 
ing in Muskoka. 



1 
GOODS ON THE SIDEWALK. 

The Montreal civic authorities are 
determined to force the merchants of that 
city to leave the sidewalks unobstructed for 
the purpose for which they were laid down. 

Several prominent storekeepers were fined 
$5 and costs each by the Recorder on Mon- 
day for placing their goods upon the side- 
walk, and thus causing an obstruction. 



SONS FOR HARDWAREMEN. 

Sons arrived this week for both Mr. Peleg 
Howland, of H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., 
and for Mr. Segimund Samuel, of M. & L. 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co. Hardware 
and Metal begs to congratulate. 



H. A. Green will open up a blacksmith 
shop at Rock Creek, Ont., in a few days. 



The Gait merchants are talking of adopt- 
ing early closing. 

The retail clerks of Rat Portage, Ont., 
are agitating for an early-closing by-law. 

Robert Phinney is enlarging his tin shop 
at Richibucto, N.B., and making extensive 
repairs. 

The annual picnic of the Burrow, Stewart 
& Milne Co., manufacturers of stoves, etc., 
Hamilton, was held on July 14 at Queen 
Victoria Park, Niagara Falls. 



Major Taylor 

THE CHAMPION OF THE WORLD 
RIDES A 

Red-Headed Iver Johnson Bicycle 

AND WINS. 

Thousands of riders throughout the country ride Iver Johnson 
Bicycles and FIND THEM SATISFACTORY. 



V 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



Branches— New York 
Boston 
Worcester 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



— t 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

POWDERS. 

DEAD SHOT" SPORTING POWDERS. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE. 



"DEAD SHOT" 



RIFLE CARTRIDGE POWDER 




"DEAD SHOT 



The Favorite Black Powder 
with all Sportsmen. 



Unsurpassed by similar graucs ol any othor manufacture. 
SCHULTZE SMOKELESS. 



SAFETY FUSE 




Hemp Safety Fuse. 
Single Tape Safety Fuse. 
Double Tape Safety Fuse 




No 4. No. 3. 

No 3 6', -lb. Keg. 
No. 4 6 -lb Keg. 

No 3 25-lb. Keg. 
No 4 -25-lb Keg. 



CANADIAN POWDERS 







Best Hard Grain White- Powder Made. 

No. 1 Tin (Equal In Measurement to Mb. Black Powder). 
No. 50 Drum (Equal In Measurement to 50-lb. Black Powder), 



FF. Trap Shooting 

FFF. Canadian Rift - 

Snapshot. Blasting Powders 

Northwest Rifle. Nos. A and B. 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



Graham Cat and Wire Nails are the Best, 



OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A VANCOUVER HARDWARE STORE. 

THE accompanying picture is an in- 
terior view of the handsome new 
store of Wm. Ralph, hardware 
merchant and dealer in housefurnishings, 
Vancouver, B.C. Mr. Ralph's business is 
one of the largest and best in the terminal 
city, and at the beginning of the present 
year he moved his stock into the premises 
now occupied and which were erected last 
year and just completed in time for occupa- 
tion when the firm moved in, in February 
last. The building is one of the finest of 
the many new blocks built in Vancouver in 
the past few years. It belongs to Mr. 
Ralph, who had it erected specially for his 
business, and his large and varied stock 
occupies the whole of its three flats and 
full-sized basement which are each 25x132 
feet. The ^block is[of brick, with extra 



one side of the store with a full line of the 
McClary enameled and granite ware, of 
which, also, a specialty is made. The store 
was especially designed by Mr. Ralph for 
effective display of stock, and the view pre- 
sented shows that the idea was successfully 
carried out. Much of the credit for the 
very neat and attractive display of the large 
stock is due to Mr. A. G. Low, to whom 
Mr. Ralph entrusts this portion of his busi- 
ness, his own time being taken up with 
supervising the many branches of the big 
business over which he has control. 

A word concerning Mr. Ralph, himself, 
will not be out of place in concluding. 
While yet a young man, with his life before 
him, he has attained a measure of success 
often not reached with a lifetime of steady 
work — not that steady work has been want- 
ing in the making of Mr. Ralph's success. 



lines handled by Wm. Ralph, and the same 
success has attended this addition as in the 
other branches of the business. 

As a rising young business man in a rising 
young city, Mr. Wm. Ralph is worthy of 
his success. 




DECREASED UNITED STATES PIG 
IRON OUTPUT. 

THE Iron Age in its current issue says : 
"Reports from furnace companies 
show that on July 1 quite a shrinkage 
had developed in the rate of production of 
pig iron as compared with June 1. The 
weekly capacity of the active furnaces was 
12,963 tons less than a month previous. 
The shrinkage was entirely in coke and 
anthracite, as the charcoal furnaces have 
slightly increased their output. The number 
of furnaces in operation is larger than had 
been expected, but the curtailment of pro- 
duction is still proceeding, and August 1 
will show more out. 
]V The weekly capacity of the furnaces in 
blast on July 1 compares as follows with 
that of the preceding periods : 



July , 
June i 
JVIay i 
il 



1900. 






Capacity 


Furnaces 


ptr week. 


in blast. 


Gross tons. 


284 


283,413 


393 


296,376 


202 


293.85° 


291 


289,482 


293 


292,643 


296 


298, U14 


280 


294,186 


283 


296,959 


277 


288,522 


265 


278,650 


257 


207,335 


244 


267,672 


237 


263.363 


220 


251 ,062 



heavy stone] foundation and the front 
finished with handsome white pressed brick, 
and large plate glass windows. 

Mr. Ralph's large staff of tinsmiths and 
plumbers find ample and well-lighted work- 
rooms in the top flat while the second is 
occupied as a warehouse, both bond and 
free, for the storage of bicycles and sewing 
machines in which a large business is done. 
The basement is used for furnaces and 
heavy stock. The ground floor, of which 
the picture is a view, is the showroom, and 
here are displayed full lines of the McClary 
"Famous" stoves and ranges, which Mr. 
Ralph sells and handles exclusively. It 
may be added that he sells a very large 
number of them in a year, and the satisfac- 
tion they give is attested by the fact that 
he sells more every year. 

The splendid range of shelves, which 
reach to the ceiling, are filled the length of 



Coming to Vancouver in 1886, he managed 
the hardware business of Vair & Miller, and 
later was a partner in the firm of O' Toole & 
Ralph which succeeded the former. He 
has continued in the business ever since 
and has long been the sole owner. The 
volume of trade done has grown with the 
city, and now Mr. Ralph has a large house- 
furnishing business as well as doing a big 
trade in plumbing and heating. As men- 
tioned, he has the sole agency for the city 
for the McClary "Famous" stoves and 
ranges. 

Ever since the bicycle industry first grew 
up, he has had a large and growing trade. 
He makes a leader of the standard Cleve- 
land, which partly accounts for the record 
he holds for the largest aggregate sales last 
year, a record likely to be retained this 
year as well. In the past year, sewing 
machines have been added to the varied 



^^^* March 1 
"^ .February 
^jjtiuarv 1 . . . 
Dewftroer i , 18 
** Novembers 

October 1 
Septamber 
August 
July, 

aFURNACE STOCKS 

" Stocks of^fjgi iron have shown further 
increase during the month, the gain in all 
kinds of iron having been 86,358 tons, as 
compared with stocks at furnaces on June 1. 

"The position of furnace stocks, sold and 
unsold, as reported to us, was as below on 
July 1, the same furnaces being represented 
as in former months. This does not include 
the holdings of the steel works producing 
their own iron : 



Stocks — 
Anthracite and coke . . 


Jan. 1. 
107,231 

• 127,346 

May 1. 

216,182 

24,895 


Feb. 1. 

126,418 
24,918 


April 1. 

177,650 
19,882 


Totals 

Stocks — 
Anthracite and coke . . 


148,336 

June 1. 

405.952 

28,728 


197,532 

July .. 

387,482 
33.556 



421,033 



Totals 241,077 334,680 

WARRANT STOCKS. 

■ ' The American Pig Iron Storage Warrant 
Co. report receipts into the warrant yards 
during June of 1,200 tons and deliveries ot 
200 tons, showing a gain in stocks of 1,00c' 
tons during the month, making the following 
showing compared with previous months : 



Stocks — 
Coke and anthracite . . . 


Jan. 1. 
3,200 
1,700 

4 900 
May 1. 

2 OOO 

1,400 


Ftb. 1. 

2, 80O 
1,500 

4.3OO 

June 1. 
3.400 
1,400 


April 1. 
t 500 


Totals 

Stocks — 
Coke and anthracite, . . 
Charcoal 


2,900 

July 1. 

4,400 

1,400 



Totals 



4.000 



4,800 



5,800 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best r-^ssible 
terms, or who are willing to become £f,*.its for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 
'SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE," 
168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

,, -i' Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
...* United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 



if 



Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder 

The cleanest, quickest and best of all. Hard grain, quick ignition, rapid 
combustion, slight residuum, no corroding of gun barrel or locks, high 
velocity, even pattern, great penetration, minimum pressure and recoil. 

Excellent keeping qualities, not affected by climatic influences. 

Safe, reliable, accurate, and pleasant to shoot. 

Absolutely Smokeless. 16-oz. to the pound. 



H 



FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS WRITE TO 



HARRY C. MARLATT, General Sales Agent, SI/VICOE, ONT. 



The TORONTO SILVER PLATE CO., Limited 

Silversmiths and Manufacturers of Electro Silver Plate. 




■MB1 



^ 



No. 091— Fruit Bowl. Satin Bright Cut and Hold-Lined. 
No. 840— Card Receiver. Satin Bright Cut. 



No. 0177— Bread Tray. Satin or Bright Finish. 
No. 715— Chocolate Pot. Embossed. 



'•^We are considered in Canada, headquarters for anything in Silverware, in either Flat or Hollow Ware. Anything stamped 

with our name, "Toronto Silver Plate Co," is fully guaranteed as to quality. 

In buying Silverware from your jobber, see that it is stamped in that way. 

Please bear in mind that we are not in the Trust or members of any Silverware Association or Combine 



FACTORIES AND SALESROOMS, King St. West, TORONTO, CANADA. 



E. G. GOODERHAW. Managing Director. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 27, 1900. 
HARDWARE. 

A JULY week cannot but be quiet 
in the hardware business. The 
farmer in this month is harvesting, 
not building fences, and thus creating a 
demand for barbed wire, or fence staples, 
or bolts, or rivets, and such things. The 
sweltering heat leads the retail merchant to 
think of holidays, rather than the pushing 
of business. The traveler, too, in many 
cases, is off duty for the time being. Yet, a 
fair business has been done the past week. 
Building goes on, even as the farmer is 
harvesting, and a demand for nails, build- 
ing material and shelf goods of all kinds is 



created. Harvesting tools must needs be 
supplied to a needy public. So there are 
many lines which must be distributed, even 
when the mail is the only ordering medium 
available. That the mail-order business of 
the past week has been brisk is a proof of 
the satisfactory financial condition of the 
country. 

Barbed Wire — There is little doing in 
this line. Some few small orders have been 
received, but carlots are not spoken of yet. 
The price is unchanged, with the base at 
$3.30 f o.b. Montreal in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — Trade is moderate. 
We quote as follows : Nos. 6, 7, and 8 
guage, S3-95I No. 9, S3. 20 ; No. 10, #4. 10 ; 
No. 11, S4.15-.N0. 12, $3.35;No. 13, $3.45; 



We quote 



No. 14, $4.50 ; No. 15, $5 ; and No. 16, 
$5.25, for small quantities. 

Smooth Wire — There is little demand 
for any variety of smooth wire 
$3. 00 per 100 lb. base. 

Fine Steel Wire — The discount is 15 
per cent, off list. Business is rather dull in 
this line. 

Brass and Copper Wire — There is not 
much inquiry. Discounts are 55 and 1% 
per cent, on brass, and 50 and 2 }£ per cent, 
on copper. 

Fence Staples — Trade is dull at $3 45 
per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Some fair sorting orders 
have been received this week ; in fact, wire 
nails are beginning to move quite freely 



A /NEW FUR/NACE 




ROUGH WOOD 

For any kind of Fuel \ 5™™™ 

(soft coal 



s 



LONDON, 

TORONTO, 

MONTREAL, 

WINNIPEC. 

or VANCOUVER. 



Made in three sizes, with capacities 
ranging from 10.000 to 50,000 cubic 
feet. The most modern and power- 
ful heater of its kind made in the 
Dominion. 

They have larger heating surfaces than any other, 
and have . . . 

Heavy sectional firepot, 

Triangular grates, 

Double fire door, size IUI5 in. 

Direct or indirect draft. 

Safety gas damper, 

Steel plate dome and radiator. 

They are easily set up, and cased. 

A High-Class Furnace at a Low Price. 

Descriptive matter will be mailed to Agents 
in a few days. 

THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



American Sheet Steel Company 

1 lattery Park Building 

New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

W. Dewees Wood Company s 

-^Planished I. on 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. II. Thompson & Company 

26 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

3. Wellington street, MONTREAL 

*0Ull.D -TO-PAY <Htfi, 
U/ifH A f 1 Qr-i amp 

DO YOtf? 

ituivertisemeti t 
•*• in the *h 

To^orJ-ro 

6 wltl bring you, 
-V-efi tendcrsfrtmjh* 

•'•v.: » -', fast cortrt-acfonr. 

Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

fj DESERONTO, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 




Prices are unchanged. We quote $3.10 for 
small lots and $3 forcarlots, f.o.b. Montreal, 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and St. John, 
N.B. 

Cut Nails — The orders received for cut 
nails have been numerous this week. They 
are not moving in large quantities, but the 
sorting orders are of a fair size and appear 
to be increasing. We quote $2.60 for 
small and $2.50 for carlots. Flour barrel 
nails, 25 percent, discount ; coopers' nails, 
30 per cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — There are not many being 
sold. The discount continues at 50 per cent, 
on Standard and 50 and 10 per cent, on 
Acadia. 

Horseshoes — The demand is improving, 
and a more active market is anticipated. We 
quote: Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.65 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, $3.90 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; 
X L steel shoes all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.85 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4 10 ; 
feather-weight, all sizes, $5.10; toe weight 
steel shoes, all sizes, $6.20 f.o.b. Mont- 
real; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and Guelph, 
ioc. extra. 

Screws — Now that it is reasonably 
certain that there will be no reduction, 
the demand is improving. Discounts 
are as follows : Flat head bright, 80 
per cent, off list ; round head bright, 75 
per cent. ; flat head brass, 75 percent.; 
round head brass, 67 '4 per cent. ; flat head 
bronze, 67% percent.; round head bronze, 
62 j£ per cent. 

Bolts — There are good quantities of 
bolts moving out, in consequence of fair 
sorting orders. Business men seem to have 
confidence in the situation as it is at present 
constituted. Discounts are : Tire bolts, 
60 per cent.; common carriage bolts, all 
sizes, 50 per cent. ; ditto, full square, 
65 per cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 52^ 
percent.; coach screws, 65 per cent.; sleigh- 
shoe bolts, 70 per cent.; blank bolts, 52^ 
percent. ; bolt ends, 52 J4 percent. ; nuts, 
square, 3J^c. per lb. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4c. off ; stove bolts, 60 and 10; plough bolts. 
50 per cent. ; Norway bolts, full, square, 
65 per cent. 

Rivets — The tone of the market re- 
mains unchanged. We quote discounts : 
Best iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
50 per cent, off; swedes iron burrs, 45 per 
cent, off; copper rivets, 35 per cent.; 
coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5 -lb. 
carton boxes, 50 per cent. off. 

Cordage — Rope is moving quite freely 
in both manila and sisal varieties. The 
base prices are unchanged at 14c. for 
manila, and 9^c. for sisal. 



TINPLATCS 

"LYDBROOK," "TRYM," 
"GRAFTON," "ALLAWAYS," 
"CANADA CROWN," ETC. 

CANADA PLATES 

" DOMINION CROWN " All Polished. 
"ALLAWAYS" hest Half Bright. 
"PONTYPOOL" Half Bright. 
"DOMINION CROWN" Galvaniied 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 



MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Offer from Store, 
Montreal, Toronto and Hamilton: 



Special Values in 

Galvanized Iron 

QUEENS HEAD. COMET 
AND APOLLO BRANDS. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASCOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHY BUY YOUR 
VARNISH IN BARRELS 

and go to all the trouble of running to 
the cellar and measuring it out in small quantities ? 

It is a waste of time and varnish, and both 
cost money. Elastilite saves all this unnecessary 
trouble and expense 

It is put up in neat lithographed tins, from 
y 2 -pints to i -gallon, with a large Show Can sup- 
plied free with the first 12-gallon order, in assorted 
sizes, making one of the most attractive ads. you 
can have in your store. 

Elastilite advertises your business. It is a 
good varnish for all purposes, either inside or out- 
side. Once used, no other can take its place. 



— Manufactured only by— 



The 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



LIMITED 



WE HAVE A LARGE AND FULLY ASSORTED 
STOCK OF 

Harvest Tools 



Forks, 
Rakes, 
Hoes, 
Scythes, 



Snaths, 
Spades, 
Shovels, 
Etc., 



and will guarantee prompt shipment from 
warehouse for immediate orders. 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



Spades and Shovels — The demand is 
encouraging. The discounts are 40 and 5 
per cent. 

Firebricks — We quote $17 to $24 per 
1,000, as to brand. 

Cement — The market is firm here, in 
sympathy with foreign quotations. As yet, 
there is no change. We quote as follows : 
German, $2.40 to $2.60 ; English, $2.30 to 
$2.40 ; Belgian, $1.80 to $2. 10. 

Tacks — The demand for tacks is quite 
active. Merely as base prices we quote : 
Carpet tacks in dozens and bulk, blued, 80 
and 5 per cent, discount ; tinned, 80 and 10 
per cent.; cut tacks, blued, in dozens, 75 
and 15 per cent, discount. 

METAL 8. 

In spite of the easy feeling that continues 
to prevail in the American iron market, 
there is a growing feeling of confidence 
here. Not only is it thought that prices 
will go no lower, but it is felt that they have 
no legitimate license to be as low as they are, 
and that an advance is not at all improb- 
able. It is with that feeling that buyers are 
going into the market. Consequently quite 
an active trade has been done this past 
week. Bar iron, particularly, is in brisk 
demand. Ingot tin continues on the ad- 
vance, while lead is also stiff. The situa- 
tion in Canada plates remains unchanged. 

Pig Iron — Fair transactions from $23.50 
io $24.50 for Summerlee, on wharf, have 
taken place this week. 



Bar Iron — The demand has been very 
active. We quote : $2.20 to $2.25 per 100 
lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

Black Sheets — There is no change. 
We quote the base on 8 to 20 gauge at $2.95. 

Galvanized Iron — A better tone pre- 
vails in galvanized iron this week. We 
quote : No. 28 Queen's Head, $4.75 
to $5.00, and Comet, No. 28, $4.40 to 
$4.65. 

Ingot Copper — The tone is firm and 
the demand active. We still quote I7}ic. 

Ingot Tin — English advices show an 
advance of £2 per ton this week, and 
the price here is 37c. 

Lead — The tone is stiff, and we quote an 
advance to a base of $4 .65. 

Lead Pipe — Shows no change. We 
quote : 7c. for ordinary and T%c. for 
composition waste, with 1 5 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — The makers still remain 
apart, and we quote : %, $2.95 per 100 ft.; 

tt. 8 2 -95; X< #3- 10 ; %. 83-45; *. 85- 2 °; 

\%, $6.75; 1%, $8.10, and 2-in., $11.00. 
Tinplates — Prices are firm and business 
is fairly active. We quote : $4.50 for coke 
and $4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — As yet, there has been 
no change, and there is a difference of 
opinion as to how the market should be 
settled. English advices are low, but many 
here have bought supplies at high figures. 
We quote as follows : 52's, $3; 60' s, $3.15; 
75's, $3.10 ; full polished, $3.50, and gal- 
vanized, $4.60. 

Terne Plate — A few boxes of terne 



plate are going out. The price remains 
unchanged at $8.50. 

Swedish Iron — Firm. We quote $4.25 
in carlots and $4.50 for less. 

Coil Chain — There is not much doing. 
We quote: No. 6, 13c, No. 5, nj^c. ; No. 
4, uc; No. 3, io%c; X-inch, 8#c; 5-16, 
8525; H, 85-io; 7-16, $5.00; %, $4.75:9-16, 
$4-7o; #,$4.25; X, $4.15; ft, $4.15, 
and 1 inch, $4.15. 

Sheet Zinc — Prices seem to vary from 
6% to 7tfc. 
Antimony — Unchanged at ioj£c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

With the exception of a slight stimulus in 
the demand for paris green and liquid paints, 
there is nothing very special to mention in 
connection with the paint and oil market. 
There has been some inquiry for vermilions 
for agricultural implement work, and var- 
nishes are being shipped a little more freely. 
Dry white lead continues to hold its own at 
the primary markets. The movement in 
Canada is only normal. Oxides and graphite 
paint for construction work seem to be in. 
fair inquiry. We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, $6.75 ; No. 1, $6.2,7% ; No. 2, 
$6; No. 3, $5.62^, and No. 4, $5.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal, prompt cash. 

Dry White Lead — $5. 75 in casks; kegs, 
$6. 

Red Lead — Firm; casks, $5.10; in 
kegs, $5.35 to $5.50. 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6#c.;in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7%c. 



CANADIAN HARDWARK AND METAL 



21 



Putty -We quote : Bulk, $ 1.95 ; blad 
ders, in bbls., $2.10; bladders, in cases 
52.25; in tins, $2.35 to $2.60. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 84c. ; boiled, 
87c, five to nine-barrels, ic. less, ten 
and twenty-barrel lots open, net cash, plus. 
zc. lor 4 months. Delivered anywhere in 
Ontario between Montreal and Oshawa at 
2c. per gallon advance and freight allowed. 

Turpentine— Single barrels, 69c. ; two to 
four barrels, 68c; five barrels and over, 
open terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

.v/ixed Paints — Firm ; $ 1 . 20 to 5 1 .40 pe 1 
gallon. 

CastorOil — Firm; 8^ to f)%c. in whole- 
sale lots, and %z. additional lor small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47 >£ to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c. 

Paris Green — Demand fair at firm prices ; 
1 -lb. packets, ig^4c., and drums, i8#c. 

Naval Stores — An active business has 
been done in naval stores, and prices gen- 
erally rule steady. We quote : Resins, 
82.75 to $4.50, as to brand; coal tar, 
$3.25 to $3.75 ; cotton waste, &,% to 5 j£c 
tor colored, and 6 to 7j£c. for white 
oakum, 5^ to 6#c, and cotton oakum, 
10 to 1 ic. 

GLASS. 

The Germans have withdrawn all quota- 
tions on glass and have advanced prices 4 
points. Glass must advance in Canada in 
sympathy before long The trade is only 
moderate. We quote as follows : First 
break, ii ; second, 82.10 for 50 feet ; first 
break, 100 feet, $3.80; second, $4 ; third, 
84.50 ; fourth, $4.75 ; fifth, J5.25 ; sixth, 
JI5.75, and seventh, 86.25. 

PETROLEUM. 

There is no change in petroleum quota- 
tions. Trade is remarkable only for its 
summer dullness. We quote: "Silver 
Star," jobbers, i6j£c. ; retail, 17 %c. ; 
" Imperial Acme," 17^ and i8#c; " S. 
C. Acme," 19 and 20c; "Astral," 20 and 
2ic. 

nir>ES. 

As last quoted : Beef hides, 8c. for No. 
1 ; 7c. for No. 2, and 6c. for No. 3. Calf- 
skins, 9c. for No. 1, and 7c. for No. 2. 

market notes. 

Coil chain is lower. 

Ingot tin shows ic. advance. 

Glass has been advanced 4 points on the 
German market. 

The base price of lead is advanced from 
84. 50 to 84-65. 

The establishment of The Canada Paint 
Company is closed down to-day, this being 
the occasion of the annual picnic of the 
employes to Otteiburn Park. 

A reduction in oil rates has been made 
by the C.P.R. and G.T.R. on all oil con- 
signed in carloads from Petrolea, Sarnia, 
Buffalo and Detroit. 

Contractor Davis. Quebec, has received 
several carloads of machinery, valued at 
over 840.000, which will be used in the 
construction of the Quebec bridge. He has 
leased Victoria Cove. 



Have You Seen O 

Our New Catalogue • 

We think you will agree that it is the most artistic, complete and 
practically valuable one ever issued by any firm in the world in our line of 
business. 

We have spared no pains or expense in making this catalogue accurate 
and up-to-the-moment in every detail. You may be interested in knowing 

that the edition weighs over Ten Tons and cost us upwards of 
Seven Thousand Dollars. 

Anyone in the trade or concerned with Architectural Sheet Metal Build 
ing Materials who has not yet received one will find it to their business ad- 
vantage to write and ask for a copy. 

They are handsomely illustrated and full of interesting technical infor- 
mation. 



METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 



KING and 

DUFFERIN 

STREETS, 



Toronto. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 27, 1900. 
UARDVVABE. 

THE wholesale hardware trade has been 
unmarked by any striking features 
during the past week. The only 
change in price we hear of is a reduction of 
10 to 15 per cent, in bolts. A good many 
of the travelers are taking their holidays, 
and business through them is naturally 
thereby curtailed. At the same time, how- 
ever, a large number of letter orders are 
beiiig received, and trade is, on the whole, 
good lor this time of the year. Retailers are, 
however, buying in small lots, and it is 
likely they will continue to do so for some 
time. There is scarcely anything being 
done in any kind of fence wire. Wire nails, 
while still quiet, are, if anything, meeting 
with a little better demand. Cut nails are 
dull. Business keeps fair in screws. Cut- 
lery is beginning to move a little better, and 
the same maybe said of arms and ammuni- 
tion. Rope is quiet, but in binder twine 
trade is more active. 

Barbed Wire — There is very little being 
done either from stock or shipment from 
factory. We still quote f.o.b. Cleveland 
$2 95 in carlots, and 83.05 in less than car- 
lots ; f.o.b. Toronto, 83 25 in less than 
carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — Business in this 
line is at a stand still. We quote as 
follows from Toronto: No. 5, #4-52>£; 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, 8385; No. 
9, 83-io; No. 10, 84; No. 11, 84 05; No. 
12, 83-25: No - '3- 53-35 : No - H. $4-4o ; 
No. 15. 8510; No. 16, 85.15. The f o.b. 
price Cleveland for Nos. 6 to 9 base is 82- 80 
in less than carloads, and 82.70 for carloads. 
Terms are 60 days or 2 per cent. 10 days. 



Smooth Steel Wire — There is nothing 
doing either in oiled or annealed or hay- 
bailing wire. Base price, S3 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — There is a little more 
being done in wire nails, but the volume of 
business is still small. The feature of the 
wire nail trade this week is the number of 
letter orders that are coming in. We still 
quote carlots at 83. and less quantities at 
83.10 per keg. 

Cut Nails — There are a few kegs going 
out, but trade in this line is flat. The base 
price is 8 2 -6o per keg, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Belleville. 

Horseshoes — Business is moderate, 
although without any special features. We 
quote, f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, 83-75 ; 
snow shoes, 84 ; light steel shoes, 83-95 : 
featherweight (all sizes), 8520 ; iron 
shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), 84; snow- 
shoes, 8425; light steel shoes, 8420; 
featherweight (all sizes), 85- 20. 

Horse Nails — The demand is just fair. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on standard oval 
head, and 50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Screws — Business is not, perhaps, as 
active as it was, but there is still a nice 
trade being done. We quote as fol- 
lows : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off 
the list ; round head bright, 75 per cent. ; 
flat head brass, 75 per cent.: round head 
brass, 67^ per cent.; flat head bronze, 
67X P er cent.; roundhead bronze, 62 }£ 
per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — The feature of trade 
in this line is a reduction in the price of 
bolts and nuts, which went into effect on 
July 25. The reduction is approximately 
from 10 to 15 per cent. We quote as 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



follows : Norway bolts, full, square, 65 
per cent. ; common carriage bolts, full 
square, 65 percent.; ditto, 5-15 and under, 
60 per cent.; ditto, y% and larger, 55 per 
cent. ; machine bolts, all sizes, 60 
per cent. ; coach screws, 70 per cent. ; 
sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; blank bolts, 
60 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
nuts, square, 4c off; nuts, hexagon, 4-'A c - 
off; tire bolts, 60 per cent.; stove bolts, 
60 and 10 per cent.; plough bolts, 55 per 
cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — A fair trade is being 
done with price unchanged. We quote: Car 
riage section, wagon box, rivets, etc. 50 per 
cent. ; black M rivets, 50 per cent. ; iron 
burrs, 45 per cent.; copper rivets, 35 per 
cent. ; bifurcated, with box, 5 -lb. carton 
boxes, 30c. per lb. 

Enameled Ware — Business continues 
fairly good. 

Ice Cream Freezers— A fair sorting up 
trade still being done. 

R OPE — Trade is quiet with prices as before. 
We quote: Pure manila, \y/ z to 14c; "A" 
quality manila, wyi to 12c. ; special 
manila, \o%. to lie; sisal, g% to 10c. 

Binder Twine — Stocks in the country 
have been light, and, now with the harvest 
on, an improved demand is being experi- 
enced, although the buying is still of a 
hand-to-mouth character. Although the de- 
mand is better prices are easier. We quote; 
Pure manila, I2^c. ; mixed, 9^c. sisal, 9c. 

Harvest Tools — There is quite a good 
demand for harvest tools, although the 
orders are individually small. Discount 
50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — There is scarcely 
anything being done in this line. Discount 
40 and 5 per cent. 

Sporting Goods— Trade is becoming a 
little more active and wholesalers are be- 
ginning to make delivery of fall orders. A 
good trade is anticipated this fall. 

Cutlery — There is a fair business being 
done for fall delivery, and orders for the 
Northwest will soon be shipped. 

Cement — The improved condition of the 
market continues, and is expected to do so 
until the end of the season. The demand 
outside is still heavy. We quote as follows 
in barrel lots : Canadian Portland, $2.80 
to #3 ; Belgian, $2.75 to #3; English do., 
$3; Canadian hydraulic cements, $ 1.25 to 
$1.50; calcined plaster, $1.90; asbestos 
cement, $2.50 per bbl. 

METALS. 

Although not many orders are being 
placed for forward delivery, the demand 
from stock is fair for this time of the year. 
Prices are being fairly well maintained, 
except, perhaps, for pig iron and bar iron, 



Pig Iron — The market is still decidedly 
weak, and prices have declined in the 
United States from 50c. to $1 per ton since 
our last review. 

Bar Iron — It is difficult to ascertain just 
exactly the price of bar iron, as sellers 
appear to be willing to take almost any 
figure; $2 to $2.10, the former being for 
carlots, probably represents, as near as can 
be ascertained, the ruling prices. The 
demand is light. 

Hoop Steel — Business is moderate at 
$3.25 base. 

Pig Tin— It is claimed that a corner has 
existed for spot tin in New York, and the 
price there has reached $35.50 during the 
week, but the receipt of fresh shipments 
has given the market an easier tone, there 
having been declines there as well as in 
London. Locally, prices are unchanged at 
37 to 38c. There has been considerable 
buying in a small way. 

Tinplates — A good business has been 
done in coke plates although at figures 
slightly under quotations. A fair trade is 
also being done in charcoal plates. 

Tinned Sheets — The demand has im- 
proved, although shipments have been 
small. 

Black Sheets — There has been a steady 
demand during the past week for small lots. 
Base price is unchanged at $3.60. 

Galvanized Sheets — The demand has 
been much more active in this line during 
the past week. The movement from stock 
has been larger than for some time. Import 
orders are also arriving. We quote : 28 
gauge, English, at $5 in case lots, and 
American at $4.60 in ton and half ton lots. 
Add 15c. for smaller quantities. 

Canada Plates — Orders in this line 
have been few. We quote : All dull, $3.50 ; 
half-polished, $3.60, and all bright, $4. 

Iron Pipe — Trade has been fair, with 
prices unchanged. Discounts are : Black 
pipe, % to y% inch, 40 per cent. ; \i inch, 60 
per cent. ; ^ to 2 inch, 66 % per cent. ; larger 
sizes, 50 and 5 per cent. Galvanized pipe: 
y z inch, 40 per cent.; X t0 2 inch, 50 per 
cent. 

Lead Pipe — A fair trade is still to be 
noted. We quote 7c. per lb., with discount 
15 per cent., f.o.b. Toronto. 

Lead — There has been a fair movement 
in small lots. We quote 5 to S/4 C - P er lb. 

Solder — The demand has been heavy 
in this line during the past week. We 
quote: Half-and-half, 21^ to 22j£c; 
refined, 21 to2i^c, and wiping, 20^ to 
21c. 

Antimony — Business has been more 
active during the past week, and a fair 
volume of trade has been done. We still 
quote Cookson's at 11 to u#c. per lb. 



II fl \l ry'n The original and only Genuine Pre- 
I |U IV I T ^ paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
UnllLI V 6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass %j\& 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.V. 

DERBY SIS A P. 

With Plated Rust Proof 
and Guarded Spring. 

" THE LATEST AND BEST." 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

^taGa -^»JP Largest Variety, 

" -— '" Toilet, Il»nd, Electric Power! 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep- Shearing Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8XND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
i»nhu Sburn Bft. Co.. Nuba*. N.H..US* 





The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over the 
ordinary spring, and lias twice the wear. In use 
throughout threat Britain and the Colonies. Gives 
perfect satisfaction. Wade only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 
Hospitals!. - BlltMlXUHAM. 



BURMAH&SOHS', LIMITED clippers 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War ( mice to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Field Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BUR MAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



L - 



Pullman Sash Balance Go, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester, N.Y.. U.S.A. 

On sale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






Copper — The demand has been small 
for ingot copper, and there has not been 
much doing in sheet copper. We quote 19 % 
to 20c. for ingot, and 23 to 23>£c for sheet 
copper. 

Zinc Spelter — Trade has been quiet in 
zinc spelter during the past week. We quote 
7 to 7#c per lb. 

Zinc Sheets — Prices are lower and we 
m s"w quote 6>£ to 7c. for casks and part 
casks respectively. The demand for this 
line during the past week has been active. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The market remains quiet, although, con- 
sidering the season, there is a fair amount 
of business being done. Turpentine, which, 
on account of the advance in Savannah, was 
expected to go up here, has failed to do so, 
and continues to fluctuate around the prices 
quoted. There is no change in the condi- 
tion of the linseed oil market. Prices remain 
firm and are not expected to change till the 
fall. A small quantity of Canadian oil has 
been on the market this week, but sold at 
the same price as imported oil. The de- 
mand for pans green is still brisk, and the 
prices remain firm. We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.87^; No. i, $6.50; No. 2, $6.12^ 
No. 3, $15.75; No. 4, $5 ; dry white lead is 
casks, 55-75- 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $5.50 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75; 
No. 1, in casks of 560 lb. ,$5 to $5.25; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $5.25 to $5.50. 

Litharge and Orange Mineral — 
Litharge, 6 to 6^c. ; orange mineral, 8 
to 8}£c 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to #7.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb.; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22^c. ; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Potty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.15 ; bulk, in bbls., 
$1.95 ; bulk, in less quantities, $2.10. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1 90 
per barrel. 

Paris Green — Petroleum, bbls., 18c. ; 

arsenic, kegs, i8#c. ; drums, 50 and 100 

lb. i8^c. ; drums, 25 lb., 19VC ; tins, 1 

«£ac^b., 2o^c; tins, j£ lb. 22^c; packages, 1 

lb., i9^c. ; packages, % lb., 2i^c 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2. 50 per cwt. 
in barrels, and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less quan- 
tity ; lump, ioc. in small lots, and 8c. in 
barrels. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gallon ; No 1 quality, 51.00 per gallon. 

Seal Oil — 54c. per gallon, and yellow 
seal at 45c. 



84,000 Dally Production. 
5 Factories. S Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the Worlc 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Slivered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glaus. 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " M ARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embo 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 

Works: Ravenhead, 8t. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street. London, EC— 128 Hope Street, Glasgow— 
12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 I'aradiBe Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address; "Glass, St. Helens." Telephone Nr, 
68 St Helens. 



Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 
to ioj^c. per lb. and 10^ to nc. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, i to 4 barrels, 
86c; boiled, 89c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 85c; 
boiled, 88c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, Guelph and London, 2C. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 71c; two 
to four barrels, 70c, delivered to outside 
points. Toronto, Hamilton, London, Sarnia, 
Walkerville, Chatham, Dresden, Wallace- 
burp; and Amherstburg, 2c less. For less 
quantities than barrels, r,c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

Prices have been advancing in Belgium, 
and dealers are looking for an advance 
here. A large quantity of glass has lately 
been coming into Canada. We quote 
first break locally : Star, in 50 foot boxes, 
$2.10, and 100-foot boxes, $4.00; double 
diamond under 26 united inches, $6.00, 
Toronto Hamilton and London ; terms 
4 months or 3 per cent., 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

There is a little better movement of old 
material this week, and dealers think it is 
the commencement of the fall trade. The 
market is, however, still quiet, and the de- 
mand is slight. We quote jobbers' prices 
as follows : Agricultural scrap, 50c per 
cwt. ; machinery cast, 50c per cwt.; stove cast 
scrap, 40c; No. 1 wrought scrap, 50c per 
100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 12c per 
lb. ; bottoms, io^c ; heavy copper, 12c ; 
light scrap brass, 7c. ; heavy yellow scrap 
brass, ioc ; heavy red scrap brass, io^c ; 
scrap lead, 2^c; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 
5c. ; good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c ; 
clean dry bones, 40 to 50c per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — Another decline of %c. in cured 
hides is quoted this week, the price now 
being %%c. The market is very quiet. We 
quote: Cowhides, No. 1, 7^c; No. 2, 
6^c ; No. 3, 6c. Steer hides are worth 
tfc. more. Cured hides are quoted at 8j^. 



Skins — The market is rather dull. Spring 
lambskins have advanced 5 to 15c since 
last week, and are now quoted at 35 to 50c 
We quote as follows : No. 1 veal, 8-lb. 
and up, 9~. per lb.; No. 2, 8c; dekins, 
from 40 to 60c; culls, 20 to 25c Sheep 
are selling at $1.25 to $1.40 ; spring lamb- 
skins, 35 to 50c each. 

Wool — There is no change in quotations 
this week, and the market remains very 
quiet. Combing fleece sells for 15 to 16c, 
and unwashed at g}4 to ioc 

PETROLEUM. 

Market conditions remain practically the 
same as last week. A small amount 
of business is doing, though it is fairly 
satisfactory for the time of the year. We 
quote as follows : Pratt's Astral, 18c. 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; American 
water white, 18c in barrels ; Photogene, 
i7J^c; Sarnia water white, 17c in barrels; 
Sarnia prime white, 1 6c in barrels. 
COAL. 

The market remains quiet, and no change 
in prices will take place until next week, 
when there may be a difference for August 
shipments. Our quotations, for July ship- 
ments, for anthracite on cars at Buffalo 
and bridges are as follows : Nut, egg and 
stove, S4.50 per gross ton, or $4.01 per 
net ton ; grate, $4.25 per gross ton, or 
$3.79 per net ton. 



market notes. 
Bolts are quoted 10 to 15c lower. 



A harness shop will soon be opened by 
W. H. Brigham in Wiarton, Ont. 

The Robin Hood Powder Co., Swanton, 
Vt., have leased Ed. Arpin's warehouse, St. 
Johns, Que., for the purpose of filling cart- 
ridges and then shipping them to various 
points in Canada. 

Michael Carmody, carriagemaker, Egan- 
ville. Ont., has sold out his business to his 
brother, John Carmody, and has gone to 
Barry's Bay, Ont., with Herman Potter, 
blacksmith, Egansville, where both will 
carry on business with Michael Conlon, 
carriagemaker, 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 24, 1900. 

THE whole city is given over to decora 
tions and festivity. The Earl of 
Minto can have no doubt as to the 
pleasure with which his visit is regarded by 
the citizens of Winnipeg. The volume of 
business for the week has been very fair. 
There is no change in this market in any 
line. We quote : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 75 

Plain twist 3 75 

Staples 4 25 

Oiled annealed wire 10 • 3 95 

" n 4 00 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 4 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 75 

" 16 and 20 3 80 

10 3 85 

8 3 9° 

6 4°5 

4 4 15 

3 4 4° 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 3 3° 

20 to 40 3 35 

" 10 to 16 3 4° 

8 3 45 

6 3 60 

4 3 7° 

3 3 95 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 65 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 5 15 

No. 2 and larger 4 90 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 5 2 ° 

No. 2 and larger 4 95 

Bar iron, $2.90 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5 basis. 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 °° 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 °° 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 4 25 

18 to 22 gauge 4 5° 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 °° 

28 gauge 5 2 5 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 12 75 

IXX " 14 75 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 4 °° 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 4 5° 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 and 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 45 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger 11 25 

H 11 75 

Yt and 5-16 12 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 15 00 

% 15 5° 

Vi. and 5-16 1600 

Solder 23}^ 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 15 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 7° P-c. 

Flat ' ' brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57 K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 42 K p.c. 

Machine 45 P c - 

Tire 55 P-c. 

Sleigh shoe ...: 65 p.c. 

Plough 4° P-c. 

Rivets, iron 37 H p.c. 

Copper, No. 8, lb 33^c. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 5°. and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 15° 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 I 25 



Linseed oil, raw, per gal 92 

boiled " 95 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 40 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 10 p c. 

C.F. military Net. 

Loaded shells, Robin Hood, M $20 00 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 7 25 

Chilled 750 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Robin Hood 10 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

Turpentine, by barrel 80c. 

Less than barrel 85c. 

ECONOMIZED MOMENTS AND 
GREATER RESULTS. 

THE schoools may do a great deal for a 
youth, but he can do more for him- 
self. That is, what he makes of 
himself depend upon himself, and not upon 
the things that schools tumble into his head 
like loads of coal into a cellar. 

You can overcome any defect of educa- 
tion if you care enough about it to try. 

It is not much harder than learning to 
dance or play pocket-pool, and is about a 
billion times more satisfactory. 

The ground that may be covered by the 
systematic use of even a small part of what 
we call " idle time " is amazing. 

George Grote, the great Greek historian, 
was a banker. He had his evenings to him - 
self. By resolutely devoting a short time 
every evening to study, in a few years he 
had taught himself Greek, mastered the 
whole range of Greek literature, filled his 
mind with the knowledge of Greece, and 
written his history, an imperishable monu- 
ment of learning and research. 

He did that with about half an hour every 
night. 

Another man took 15 minutes a day, and 
in 10 years had so saturated himself with 
the choicest works of English literature that 
he had expert knowledge of them. 

The " idle hours" are really the most 
valuable in life. There never was a success- 
ful man or woman who did not turn such 
hours to profit, and there never was man or 
woman who habitually wasted them and 
didn't end a failure. 

It is rather an odd thought, but perfectly 
true, that there is at this moment probably 
not one poorly paid, hard-working young 
man — clerk, stenographer, salesman, 
artisan, laborer, office boy, whatever he 
may be — who has not ample time to make 
himself a great success in life, just as there 
are few who will make themselves anything 
but comparative failures. And what will 
chiefly determine one way or the other are 
the "idle hours," you can be very sure of 
that. — N.Y. Evening Journal. 



DOG 
DAYS 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 
COMPANY 
Limited 



Respectfully announce to their 
clients and the trade generally, 
that, owing to the usual 

AKMER 

holidays, the travellers will not 
be making their calls with their 
accustomed regularity. Mean- 
time, orders 

By Letter 
By Wire 
By 'Phone 

will continue to receive prompt 
attention. 

Visitors will be cordially wel- 
come at our 

Head Office and Works, 
572 William St., MONTREAL, > 
or at 
90 Bay Street, TORONTO. 



cot 

LIMITED. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



PANADIAN ADVERTISING ii liest done by THE 
^ E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 
Montreal 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 



Wolverhampton, England. 



-ianufacturers of 



"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 



6 St. Sacrament St. 



MONTREAL 



F. A. YORK, Manager. 



TRENT CANAL. 



SIMCOE-BALSAM LAKE DIVISION. 



NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned 
and endorsed " Tender for Trent Canal," will be 
received at this Office until noon Friday, 241I1 August, 
1900, for the construction of about thirteen miles of Canai 
between Kirkfield and Lake Simcoe, which will be divided 
into two Sections. 

Plans, specifications of the woik and forms of Contract 
can be seen at the office of the Chief Engineer of the 
Department of Railways and Canals, at Ottawa, or at the 
Superintending Engineer's Office, Peterborough, where 
forms of tender can be obtained on and after Tuesday, 
24th July, 1900. 

In the case of firms there must be attached the actual 
signatures of the full name, the nature of the occupation, 
and place of residence of each member of the same, and, 
further, an accepted bank cht.|ue for the sum of $15,000 
must accompany the tender for each section; these 
accepted cheques must be endorsed over to the Minister of 
Railways and Canals, and will be forfeited if the p rties 
tendering decline entering into contract for work at the 
rates and terms stated in the offer submitted. The 
accepted cheques thus sent in will be returned to the 
respective parties whose tenders are not accepted. 

The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted 
By order, 

L. K. JONES, 

Secretary. 
Department of Railways and Canals, 1 
Ottawa, July i6th, 1900. / 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity fiom the Department will not be paid for it. (31) 



"BR 


•A-SSXO" 


Bat & Coat 


Crfiu 


k BOOKS. 


2 Dos. 


ko. 10a 



TRADE M \KK 
SAVE MONEY BY BUYING 

Gunn's Patent 

Brassic Goods 




Equal to solid brass in every particular. Cost 
less money — look and wear as well. Sales increas- 
ing all the time. 



THE GUNN CASTOR CO., Limited. 

KNOX HENRY, 

Canadian Agent, 320 Board of Trade Montreal 



EXTENDED 
INSURANCE. 



One of the many liberal features embodied in the 
UNCONDITIONAL ACCUMULATIVE POLICY 

issued by the 

Confederation 
Life Association. 

HEAD OFFICE-TORONTO. 



is the provision for Extended Insurance. After three full annual premiums 
have been paid, the insured is entitled to Extended Insurance for the full 
amount of the policy for a term of years definitely stated therein. Paid-up 
and Cash Values also guaranteed. 

Rates and full information sent on application to the Head Office, To* 
jy^Jronto, or to any of the association's agents. 



W. C. Macdonald, 

Actuary. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 



Managing Director 



The James Robertson Co., Limited. St. John, N.B., are 

exhibiting paints and gas and plumbing fittings at Paris Exposition. 

Wm. Appel, harnessmaker, Milverton, Ont., is going west, 

and has sold out bis business to S. Rumford, Port Huron, who 

will take possesion about August i. 



Short But Frequent Talks 




WE SHOW ABOVE, THE 



BOWSER 



GLASS 

FRONT 

CABINET. 

Finished In Antique Oak or <i rained and varnished. 
with 

PUMP Measuring SMLlons 



QUARTS 
AT A STROKE. 

i-itti Steel Ball Cage Valves, Anti-Di 



Equipped 
Nozzle anil Dial Discharge Register. We bu Id Forty 

\ ine ..Hum st\ 1"*. V.m nillsl b. hard tO suit If we can't 
please you. We should like to try. Bead 11s your ad- 

. .lay. 



Is our idea 
of advertising Oil 
Tanks. Merchants 
rather seem to fall 
in with the idea 
too, judged by the 
number of in- . . 
quiries coming by 
every mail This 
question ii an all- 
absorbing one with 
us, of course, but 
we realize that . . 
other people may 
be equally absorb- 
ed in their own af- 
fairs and hence we 
endeavor not to 
lire or "bore" them 
by "harping con- 
tinually on one . 
string." It is un- 
necessary to say 
much about the 
elegant outfit . . 
shown herewith. 
It speaks for itself. 
It certainly is a 
beauty and a . . 
triumph of the . 
cabinetmaker's . . 
art. And it's as 
good as it is hand- 
sorre. In short, it 
is up to the Bow- 
ser standard. . 
which is nothing 
short of "Perfec- 
tion" in Oil Tanks. 
This is as fine an 
outfit as we build. 
We build others 
lhat work just as 
accurately, but are 
not so ornamental 
— they cost less — 
though none are 
expensive 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., I 



0. Box 56*. TORONTO. 
Factory: FORT WAYNE, IND. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



THE INFLUENCE OF PLUMBERS' ASSOCIATIONS. 



THE educative influence is the most 
important and most productive of the 
influences exerted by the National 
Association of Master Plumbers or any of its 
subordinate branches. Some cynics may 
say, and they do say it, that the plumbers 
who are members of an association are 
engaged in a vain endeavor to increase 
prices, to grind down wages, to bring the 
supply men to low terms, or to confine and 
restrict the trade to themselves. Of course, 
such arguments carry no weight. But, be 
that as it may, who can deny the existence 
of 

THE GREAT EDUCATIVE INFLUENCE 

of the plumbers' associations ? What 
plumber has joined an association with his 
confreres, has taken an interest in its wel- 
fare, and has attended a convention, with- 
out becoming thereby a better and more 
competent plumber ? 

And yet the convention does not take the 
form of a school, nor does the entertain- 
ment at a monthly meeting of an association 
take the form of essays on different branches 
of sanitary science. Perhaps, the meeting 
would be more profitable ; perhaps, there 
would be greater education, if such were the 
case. But it is not. How, then, is it that 
an association plumber is 

A MORE FIT MEMBER 

of his profession than his isolated neighbor 
who has served as long an apprenticeship ? 
It is simply because he has new duties im- 
posed upon him. 

He takes a different view of the purpose 
of his profession. He will not sacrifice 
good plumbing for immediate gain or for 
the securing of a contract. He learns the 
advisability of doing good work ; he re- 
cognizes his responsibility. 

In his address, this year, to the National 
Master Plumbers' Association, President 
Harris said : " Let us educate our members 
in the way of protecting the public in 
giving them good work. Let us have in 
our association none but men who under- 
stand that we have to reduce the work of 
doctors, by preventing desease, in giving 
the public the very best sanitary plumbing." 
That is the main purpose of the plumbers' 
associations in Canada to-day, and it is the 
inflexible determination of the associations 
to accomplish this aim that has reduced 
this education to tangible form. This 
tangible form is 



SANITARY LEGISLATION. 

Nearly all Canadian legislation that apper- 
tains to plumbers or plumbing has origin- 
ated with associations of the members of 
the profession. 

That work is still going on, and, as efforts 
are succeeding, wider fields of operation are 
opening out. As a matter of fact, the 
campaign has only begun, and will not end 
even with the triumphant achievement of a 
national plumbing code. But, meanwhile, 
small successes are being gained in different 
sections, all the way from Halifax to Vic- 
toria. Let us look at 

SOME OF THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

of the past year. The Toronto plumbers 
carried on a campaign against some pro- 
posals that were not calculated to elevate 
the profession. The Brantford Plumbers' 
and Steamfitters' Union showed up the 
incompetency of a plumbing inspector, and 
improved their system. The Hamilton 
plumbers clamored for by laws, and ex 
posed the ridiculous and impracticable side 
of some regulations proposed by the board 
of health. The Halifax plumbers have 
established an examination board. But the 
most important success is now being gained 
in Montreal, where the council is passing a 
code which will 

FORCE ALL MASTER PLUMBERS 

to pass an examination and make them 
responsible for the work they do. Certain 
building regulations will also concern the 
the plumbers. Vitrified tile, for instance, 
will have to be laid in cement. Hitherto, 
although the Montreal plumbers were well 
posted on the science of plumbing and 
sanitation, low prices have prohibited them 
from putting in the best work. Conse- 
quently, the public health has not been 
safeguarded. It is hoped that the new laws 
and new inspectorate will improve the 
condition of affairs. And so the work goes 
merrily on. 

PROVINCIAL CODES NEEDED. 

Is it not high time that Provincial codes 
was formulated, and an agitation for their 
enactment commenced ? The plumbers' ex- 
amination ought at least, like that of the 
doctors, to be a Provincial affair. 

It is to be hoped that the plumbers in 
unorganized towns will look after their own 
interests by coming together and cooperating 



in the task whose accomplishment will only 
be for their own interests. 

The educative influence should be made 
far-reaching. It comes from associa* '£""" 
So there should be an association in every 
town that counts plumbers amongst its 
inhabitants. 



PLUMBING NOTES. 

M. J. Chisholm has withdrawn from the 
firm of Chisholm & Co., plumbers, New 
Glasgow, N.S., and he and Charles H. 
Mackay have formed partnership as 
Chisholm & Mackay. They will carry on 
business in the same place. 



TENDERS FOR A STATION. 

Tenders for the building of the new fire 
station at Hochelaga were accepted at the 
meeting of the Montreal Fire Committee 
last Thursday. It had been decided to call 
for tenders for the work separately. The 
following is the result : 

J. H. Lambert, painting and glazing, 
$593 ; F. Decarie & Sons, plastering, $398; 
J. H. Giroux, plumbing and heating, $1 ,090; 
J. H. Giroux, roofing, #725 ; Chapleau & 
Lebeuf, carpenter work, $4 384 ; O. Marti- 
neau, masonry, $3,111; J. B. Lalonde, 
Electricity, $450 ; P. Lebue, ironwork, 
#1,747; L. J. Rochon, brickwork, $2,497. 



PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIPS. 

AT the annual convention of The 
National Association of Master 
Plumbers of the United States, the 
question of apprenticeship was opened by 
the reading of the apprenticeship com- 
mittee's report. This report favored the 
securing of an agreement from the journey- 
men plumbers and restriction in the number 
of apprentices. 

In the discussion that followed, many 
opinions were heard. One member did not 
agree in restricting the number of appren- 
tices ; if the trade school plumber was pro- 
ficient he must be recognized, and if the 
members of the association could not hold 
their own, they must go to the rear. It was 
pointed out by another that there were 
agreements existing between masters and 
journeymen masons, plasterers and roofers, 
and the plumbers needed an apprenticeship 
agreement also. The restricting of the 
number of apprentices was several times 
objected to, one plumber saying that he 
refused to relinquish the right of being 
master of his own shop. Reference was 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



zt 



PLUMBING 



Recomninnl.iticMi 



\ - : 1 1 1 > i i > • < l customer the knui lhal 
u in oomi obtained by good «mk 

mill g i goods. 

The J. M. T. Cushion-Disc Faucet 
imi good one. Made lu the dlft'erenl i ai 

ii. Basin, sink and Laundry. Has a 

vatdinr, prevents hammering, que 

In design. madvertlsemenl for the pi i 
» ho usee them, l he trade BuppUi ii by 



The Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 



TORONTO 



Limited. 




HOT WATER 
INSTANTLY, 

NIGHT OR DAY. 

Boiling Water 
in a Minute. 
Hot Bath When Wanted 



EWART'S 

"LIGHTNING" 

GEYSER 

FOR GAS OR OIL. 

346 EUSTON ROAD. 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Illustrated Price List Free. 



Refrigerators 

BUY 

EUREKA 

it is the best. 
WHY? 

i^t. Because it is 
built on scientific princi- 
ples, having insulated 
walls it is easy on Ice. 

2nd. Because the sys- 
tem of circulation of air 
is perfect. 

3rd. Because it is well 
built. 

Further information 
can be obtained in cata- 
logue which is free. 

Address, 

Eureka 
Refrigerator Co. 

This cut represents No. 13. 54 Noble St., Toronto 




jw* 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESSUPPIIG BUREAU, 

5:5 Board of Trade Bldg., MO.NTHKAI,, QUE 

Telephone Maiu 1255. 

26 Front St. West. Toriititn. Telephone 2148. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attend id to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers ot 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 




KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220'/, Board of Trade. MONTREAL. 

SPECIALTIES C Bran.. la— Canada 

BolM Null < 10, 

BOLT8— Tire and Stove Klvets ot all kl 
craft Screw DO. 

BRASS GOODS ■ uunn Caatoi 
mlngbam, Bog, 



HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 




WORCESTER, MASS., U. S. A. 



l^Z REVOLVERS 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE. 

For sale by Sporting Goods and 
Hardware Stores almost everywhere. 



Berlin Felt Boot Co. 



BERLIN, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Guaranteed 
BEST and 
CHEAPEST 
in the 
market. 



HAIR FELT 



Hade in 
1/2 INCH 
3/4 " 



For Water and Steam Pipe Covering. 

We keep a Large Stock to make Prompt Shipments. 



AS GOOD AS THE 
BEST, AND BETTER 
THAN MOST. 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, CAN. 



Special list of low-priced Japanned 
and Regalvanized Wire Cloth. 

D 

24, 30, 36 in. wire, in 50 ft. rolls. 

SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



made to the plumbers' strike in Philadelphia, 
in which the master plumbers had won, as 
the best workmen had shown that the 
agitator who caused the strike was their 
enemy ; and now the Philadelphia plumbers 
were forming independent local associations. 
The abolition of the helper was thought by 
some to be the proper solution of the 
question. "Do we wish," said one, "to 
regulate the apprenticeship question so as 
to give the journeymen the upper hand, 
or do we wish to regulate it so that the 
apprentice will become a good workman ? 
I think the question could be settled so as 
to help the East without hurting the West. 
I favor using only the apprentice and doing 
away with the helper ; then doing honestly 
by the apprentice and endeavoring to make 
him a thorough workman." Still another 
speaker favored allowing each section or 
locality to settle the question according to 
its requirements. 

The motion, that the committee be con- 
tinued, and the report be referred back to 
them, so that, in connection with The 
National Executive Committee, they could 
work for a final agreement and report at the 
next convention, was carried. 



TORONTO PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

W. Mashinter & Co. have secured the 
contract for the plumbing in Maxwell Carr's 
dwelling on St. Patrick street. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

Louis Thibault is building a residence in 
Quebec city. 

A new Mosonic Hall is to erected in 
Sombra, Ont. 

A Baptist college is being built in Brandon, 
Man. 

A new school building is being erected in 
Ottawa. 

A new church is being built at Port 
Elmsley, Ont. 

John Burns is building a dwelling at Port 
Arthur. 

A new schoolhouse will be built in 
Bethel, Ont. 

Dr. Beeman is building a new house in 
Newburgh, Ont. 

A new Methodist church will be erected 
in Sydney, N.S. 

A. O. Pasley will shortly build a dwelling 
in O'Connor, Ont. 

A Salvation Army Barracks is being 
built at Carberry, Man. 

Tenders are called for to erect a town 
hall at Gravenhurst, Ont. 

L'Academie Ste. Marie will be recon- 
structed immediately in Montreal. The 



building will be three storeys high, with 
basement for gymnasium. 

A. Fawcett is building a new house in 
Nation Valley, Ont. 

McKay & Mathieson are building a new 
store at Reaverton, B.C. 

Archie M. Reid, Oivet, Ont., is building 
a new warehouse in that place. 

Tenders are asked for the erection of a 
school building at Winnipeg, Man. 

A school building is to be erected at 
North Bay, Ont., to cost $i 1,000. 

The City Dairy Co , Toronto, will erect a 
brick and stone building in that city. 

Reeve McGregor, of Southampton, Ont., 
intends to build a residence in that place. 

C. R. Cunningham will erect a residence 
on MacLaren street, Ottawa, to cost $3,500. 

S. Henry, Cornwall, Ont., is building a 
large addition to his store at Maxville, Ont. 

The Sisters of Providence will erect a 
large building for school and other purposes 
in Montreal. 

An extensive annex is being built to the 
Bank of Montreal, Wellington street, 
Ottawa. 

The Robertson Taylor Co.'s factory at 
Guelph, Ont., is expected to be commenced 
on August 1. 

A Dominion Government building is to 
be erected in Kamloops, B.C., providing 
accommodation for a post office and other 
offices. 

Building permits have been issued in 
Toronto this week as follows : B. J. Judge, 
four two-storey attached roughcast, brick- 
fronted dwel ings on Taylor street, $1,500; 
Mr. Emma Edward, pair two-storey semi- 
detached brick dwellings. 410 and 412 
Manning avenue, $3 800; R. Wat-on, one- 
storey brick dwelling, Withrow avenue, near 
Broadview avenue, $1,800 ; Rice. Lewis & 
Son, five-storey brick addition to warehouse, 
corner King and Victoria streets, $10,000 ; 
Wm. Williamson, pair two storey semi- 
detached brick and roughcast dwellings, 
Gerrard street, near Bolton avenue, $4,000 



AGENT WANTED FOR PAINTS, ETC. 

A firm of oil and color manufacturers in 
Edinburgh, Scotland, whose name is among 
the few on the list of the British Admiralty, 
is desirous of opening an agency in Canada 
for paints and varnishes. 

Hardware and Metal will be pleased 
to forward communications from applicants. 



TILBURY BUSINESS MEN. 

MR. W. C. Crawford, general, or you 
might say departmental store, for 
you could scarcely conceive of any 
article he does not carry in his monster new 
premises in Tilbury, which for modern con- 
venience could hardly be improved on. Mr. 
Crawford is a hustler, and has the tact to do 
everything in systematic order, and although 
kept so busy in superintending so larfr t. 
business, has always time to see all callers, 
and dispose of them in a way which makes 
them feel they would like to call again. 
Judging from the fine premises and active 
business carried on there, the Tilbury 
merchants must be prospering. 

Since I last visited Tilbury, Mr. J. S. 
Richardson, general merchant, has moved 
into his large new brick premises, 40 x 155 
ft ; with plate glass front, 14 x 37 ft. This 
is one of the finest stores I have seen. 
There is not a single pillar to obstruct the 
view over the whole floor, the ceilings being 
supported by steel girders. On the first 
floor, dry goods, boots, shoes, hats, caps, 
and ready-made clothing are tastily arranged, 
while, at the back, the grocery department is 
located. On the south side is a fine suite of 
offices of fine workmanship, finished in ash. 
The second floor is devoted to the millinery, 
carpet and housefurnishing lines. The 
building is heated throughout by steam, 
lighted by electricity, and cash carriers 
traverse the whole store. 

Mr. Richardson is an active business man, 
and courteous to everyone. He reports 
business good. 



Charles Reimann, a carriage blacksmith 
of Winnipeg, Man., has invented a new 
swivel for the front axles of wagons by 
which the vehicle can turn in half the space 
required by the old-fashioned rigs. 



A NOISE-PROOF HOUSE. 

It is stated that a man in Chicago has 
recently completed what is claimed to be a 
noise-proof house, as a protection to him- 
self and his family against street dins. The 
house is pointed to by the anti-noise agitators 
as a possible solace to persons suffering from 
midnight cat cries, dog barks and railroad 
whistle screechings, and daybreak crowing of 
roosters, banging of delivery wagons and 
rattling of coal shovelers. This plan is the 
filling of all cracks and apertures in the 
house which might admit sound with a 
material so constructed as to afford access 
to air while shutting out noise. The 
material which the owner says discriminates 
between noise and air is in the form ofjk. 
strips of rubber, perforated with zigzag 
holes. Through this the air is admitted, 
while the noise is softened or completely 
deadened, the sound waves dying out in 
repeated reflections in the crooked passages. 
These strips of rubber have been placed 
over all cracks around the doors and 
windows of the house, and two months' 
experience with the plan has convinced the 
owner, he says, of its practicability. — Metal 
Worker. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ISLAND CITY 




The best way for a hardware dealer to insure the success 
of his business is to handle 

The Island City Mixed Paints 
Floor Paint dries hard in 8 hours 
The Island City Varnishes 
The Island City White Lead 
The Island City Pure Colors in Oil 
and Japan. 

Customers are sure when they buy our Island City Paints 
that they get the best value for their money. 



P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, 

TORONTO, HALIFAX, WINNIPEG 



188-190 McGill Street. 
MONTREAL. 



ALUMINUM SAFETY CHAIN 



A % 





We are now making ALUMINUM "PLUMBERS" and "REGULAR" 
SAFETV CHAIN. The price Is low, and for many purposes it is better than the 
ordinary chain. We, of course, continue to manufacture the brass chain, making 
all the standard sizes and styles together with a complete assortment of accessories 
such as Shooks, Split Links, etc. Special Plumbers' chain price list on application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, Niagara Falls, Canada 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. 



NORTON EMERY WHEELS 



properly selected for your work 
will give better results than any wheel you have 
used. We carry at all times a large assortment of 
wheels, and have many customers on our list for 
whom we carry special wheels. 



We should like to do it for you. 



» 



_Eacb.< 



NORTON BENCH 



AND 



FLOOR GRINDERS. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO 




749 CR-A.IG STEEET, 



zucozlSTTZRE^il. oxriE. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE QUESTION OF QUANTITY DISCOUNTS. 



By J. D. 

IT was suggested by our secretary that 
what I have to say would be merely 
introductory to the subject, which would 
be discussed by the convention, and, as a 
consequence, what I shall have to say to 
you will be an impromptu talk, as I pre- 
pared no particular remarks upon this sub- 
ject, and do not expect to take very much 
of your time. 

This is a question on which there is argu- 
ment on both sides. The question of 
quantity discounts has been recognized for 
a long period of time. It has the pre- 
cedence of history behind it, and it has 
some arguments in favor of it. We might 
say the very question of being a jobber itself 
carries with it the idea that we are entitled 
to a differential on account of the quantities 
we take, and that is true. A manufacturer 
will say that he can handle large quantities 
for less expense, and he can manufacture 
them more cheaply, and have less invoices 
to make out, and you can give a number of 
reasons why a quantity would be more 
favorable to him, and why he would be 
ready to grant it, because he likes to intro- 
duce large purchases and dispose of his 
product as rapidly as he can. 

But it is necessary to look at the other 
side of this question. There are some 
dangers in this direction. The trade, as we 
all know, even among jobbers, have not 
the same capacity as to quantity. Some 
jobbers, who are legitimate jobbers, cannot 
take as great quantities as some other men 
who are jobbers as well and can handle 
large quantities. 

LARGE JOBBER USES EXTRA DISCOUNT. 

It we make preference in this direction, a 
danger arises, because the large jobber will 
use his extra discount to invade the territory 
of the smaller jobber and very often make a 
price upon which the small jobber cannot 
work. In order for this small jobber to get 
the extra discount he takes a quantity that 
he is not able to dispose of with the legiti- 
mate trade. Consequently he seeks a fellow 
jobber, or someone else, or perhaps the 
retail trade, 'and makes a price on his 
surplus that breaks him up, because he 
says, " It is better for me to dispose of half 
of my product at cost in order that I may 
get the price on the other half on such basis 
as I can handle it." He is not thinking at 
the time that he will produce any demorali- 
zation, but he does. There is no condition 
with this jobber. When he goes and over- 
loads himself he finds difficulty in meeting 
his bills, and he finds the bills are maturing 



* Paper read before the convention of the Southern 
Hardware Jobbers' Association. 



Moore. 

and he must realize, so he goes into the 
market somewhat desperate and creates 
considerable harm. Here he does harm to 
the larger buyer, who can handle the 
quantity required. He goes out and de- 
moralizes his trade, and makes a price at 
which, if he sells his goods, there will not 
be that profit there ought to be, and there 
comes up a long story and the many evils 
that follow overbuying and a demoralized 
market. 

Another thing. If you get this extra 
discount, then very often the small man 
can take the small quantity through a syn- 
dicate buyer and get an advantage of the 
large man, of the man who takes larger 
quantities. The syndicate buyer will take 
the quantity himself, and he will give these 
prices to the smaller man, or to a man who 
can handle more goods, but not enough to 
take the extreme quantity. I was told 
recently, by the representative of a bolt 
manufacturer, that the recent price on bolts 
was broken through a syndicate buyer sell- 
ing his goods to his own customer at less 
price than the manufacturer did. The 
syndicate buyer, having a number of cus- 
tomers, could take the quantity very easily, 
and, making an extremely low price, the 
market was broken, and demoralization 
came, and a great deal of trouble followed. 

CLASSIFY THE BUYERS. 

My theory is to classify your buyers. 
Legitimate jobbers should have the same 
price, because the small jobber has just as 
much expense going out hunting the busi- 
ness as the large jobber ; his traveling 
man has to pay railroad fare and hotel bills, 
and the salaries are the same as the large 
jobber. When he goes out he ought to be 
placed on a footing whereby he could secure 
the business and have the same share of 
profit as the large man, and then he can 
keep the larger man from coming into his 
territory and demoralizing the price. I 
understand and realize that this question of 
classifying buyers is a difficult one, even 
among jobbers themselves. When it comes 
to taking the quantity, there is some diffi- 
culty. 

We ought to have wise heads in the 
selection of what are legitimate jobbers, and 
they should be put on the same plane. While 
that may seem unjust to the large man, and 
reasoning along the first principles of the 
quantity which has been recognized and 
recognized so long, I think the evils that 
flow from it are greater than they would be 
to classify your buyers and put all in the 
same class as to quantity, but if he is a 
jobber then he is as much entitled to the 



prices where he has to send out and hunt 
for trade as the large man, so he would not 
have to sacrifice his profits in order to get 
the goods into the market. 

As I said at the outset, my remarks were 
intended as introductory, and I hope there 
are some other gentlemen here who have 
ideas on this subject, because there is 
argument for both sides, but my conclusion 
is that a classified list of buyers is the ^ ~~. 
and best. 



CANADIAN WALL PAPER AT PARIS. 

PDARTIGUENAVE, the leading New 
York designer, has written a letter 
• to a New York wall paper journal 
as follows relative to his observations at the 
Paris Exposition : 

Paris, June 20, 1900. 
In my last letter I told you I would writ e 
to you again about what I might find inter- 
esting in the wall paper exhibits of the Paris 
Exposition. The other day I was visiting 
the English Colonies, when I was agreeably 
surprised to see a beautiful display made by 
The Watson, Foster Co. in- the section of 
Canada. They have a very large and 
splendid showcase where one can see a 
selection of the best samples of their line. I 
was not the only one to be attracted by their 
showing, for a whole crowd were standing 
around, admiring the richness of the color- 
ings and the grace of the drawings. One of 
the company's best and most attractive 
samples is a large parlor paper in half- 
tapestry shades and with a heavy gold 
background. I have hardly ever seen any- 
thing of a more striking and artistic effect. 
I will not try to depict to you all the good 
things I have seen in their exhibit. A design 
is something that must be looked at ; a 
description of it is hardly interesting. Still, 
I will tell you that their assortment is com- 
plete. Florals, heraldics, halls, scrolls, etc., 
are in great variety. Besides their central 
display, they have a number of panels, 
spread a little all over the rooms of the 
Canadian section. 

I have also noticed in the section of the 
United States two beautiful rooms decorated 
with papers of Wm. Campbell & Co. You 
have already given their complete descrip- 
tion in your weekly paper, so I need only 
tell you that they are of great taste and 
attract a great deal of attention. 

Do I need to tell you that the exhibition 
here is now in full bloom ? Paris is no 
more the capital of France, but seems to be 
in the hands of strangers, for one can hesjjt. 
all languages spoken here. Americai 
especially, are in great numbers. They 
will find here all they want that is interest- 
ing, for the American exhibit alone is of 
great importance, and it would take several 
months to study it thoroughly. 

Yours, most sincerely, 

P. Dartiguenave, 
31 Avenue de la Republique, 

Nanterre, near Paris, France. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent andMetal Broker 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and Aiuerioan manufacturers or 
Tinplate»,Tiunedhhoot«, Terne Plates, Canada ttlates, Gal- 
vanized Sheets, Imitation RusaiaSheets. Black Sheets— Iron 
and Steel— Hoops and Bands, Proved Coil Chain, Brass and 
Copper Sheets, Norway Iron and Steel, Wheelbarrows.etc. 




VanTnyl & Fairbank 



Petrolla, Ont. 
Headquarters (or . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools. Cables, etc. 



V/UbWl/?acuL)i!4.*{. . 



S^j/r 



"//»*« 



COOPER PATENT ELBOWS 

Bright and Common. 




E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

Sole Manufacturers 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



^TlCv. ML 

Each J 



"JARDINE" 

TIRE UPSETTERS 
WILL UPSET TIRES 

Some machines sold as Upsetters will not. 
Perhaps you make as much money on the 
sale of a useless Upsetter as on a good 
one, but your customer does not. He 
don't want a machine because it is called 
an Upsetter he wants a machine to upset 
tires. Sell him one of ours. 

IT PAYS TO SELL THE BEST TOOLS 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



Berger's Gutter Hangers. 









The very best m.de. Strong and easy to put up and adjust. By proper selection of th<: shank the rcquiri 
for any style eave will be met. Other kind~ of Hangers, Pipe Hooks and Fasteners, Gutter and Pipe, and a general 

line of Tinners' and Roofers' Supplies. 



BERGBR BROS. CO., 



PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Babbitt Metals . . . 
Tinners' »»d Plumbers' Solder 
Ingot Brass, etc. 



IMPORTERS ANO DEALERS 

Pig Tin, Pig Lead 
Ingot Copper . . 
Antimony, etc. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. ^IrffiKv. 



This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, shshhiHL 




STEVENS 



IN 



Stevens 




We make a perfect line 



CALIPERS and DIVIDERS 

Also such tools as Surface Gauges, Tool 
Makers' Clamps, Center Punches, etc. 

Write for our New Catalogue containing a description of our Tools. 
It is also a valuable hand-book of information for mechanics and people 
interested in such lines. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 

P.O. Box 216, Cblcopee Falls, Mass, U.S.A. 



Carried by our representatives at Toronto and Montreal. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Band Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored, Tennis and Fi , Nets. 
Skipping: Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON ORE MOVEMENT FOR 1900. 

THE effect of the curtailment movement 
all along the line, from blast furnaces 
to steel works, rolling mills and 
foundries, is seen at length in iron ore. 
The Mesabi range, where the proportion of 
advance sales to estimated production was 
smaller than on the old ranges, responded 
first. Several properties have been entirely 
shut down, including the Victoria and 
Sauntry, and there has been a reduction of 
forces at the Auburn, Biwabik, Oliver and 
other mines. On the Marquette range the 
forces at the Cambiia and Lillie mines have 
been reduced one half and the Volunteer 
mine has been closed down. The Cuff mine 
on the Menominee range will be worked for 
an output of 50,000 tons instead of 125,000 
tons as intended. At a number of the other 
properties there is a revision of early 
estimates which will work a considerable 
reduction in outputs scheduled. 

We call attention to this condition in 
view of the exception taken in some quarters 
to a recent statement in these columns that 
the total shipments for the season promised 
to be nearer 16,000,000 tons than 20,000,- 
000 tons, or rather under than over 18,000,- 
000 tons. 

In the case of the large steel companies, 
which have their own ore supplies, it is 
certain that their ore programmes will be 
modified in the balance of the season by 
the demand upon them for finished material, 
and that shipments in the closing months of 
the season are likely to show a substai ial 
decline from the present price. More tl in 
ever, with so large a proportion of the o, k :- 
put of Lake Superior ores going to mine- 
owning steel companies, can the movement 
of ore be adjusted to conditions arising after 
the season is fully under way. 

The Mesabi range programme of 8,000,- 
000 tons is certain to be materially reduced, 
and the output is not likely to exceed 6,626,- 
384 tons of last year. Here are nearly 
1,500,000 tons to be taken from the 20,- 
000,000-ton estimate. On the old ranges, 
too, every effort will be made to adjust 
shipments very closely to consumptive 
needs as they shall be made plain in the 
remaining months of the season. If such 
a shutting down of blast furnaces takes place 
as is now discussed, it can be seen that an 
18,000,000 ton estimate for the water ship- 
ments of Lake Superior ore this year will 
still leave large lee-way for the ore that will 
go on dock. And with freights at this 
year's height it will be appreciated that this 
factor will be reduced to the very lowest. 
The best estimate of the consumption of 
Lake Superior ores between May 1, 1899, 
and May 1, 1900, puts the total close to 
18,000,000 tons. Who doubts on which 



side of that total the statistics for the year 
ending May 1, 1901, will fall? — Iron Trade 
Review. 



TORONTO'S GREAT ALL-CANADA 
EXHIBITION. 

" Educational and Entertaining, Aggres- 
sive and Progressive," are the very 
appropriate watchwords adopted by The 
Toronto Industrial Exhibition this year, 
which will be held from August 27 to 
September 8. This is the twenty- second 
successive year of Canada's great Exposition 
at Toronto. It is the intention to make the 
exhibition immediately approaching superior 
to all its predecessors. 

A good deal of the space has already 
been taken up, and a number of entries 
have been made, but there are so many 
divisions comprised in the prize list, with its 
131 classes and $35,000 in premiums, that 
there is ample provision for all ; and, 
talking of those divisions, it is interesting to 
note that there are no fewer than 55 in class 
128, knitting, shirts, quilts, cloths, etc. ; 
354 in class 54, poultry ; and an average 
of 16 or 17 in each of the two dozen 
classes devoted to horse and cattle. This 
will give some idea not only of the scope of 
Toronto's Great Exposition, but also of the 
opportunities offered to secure a prize. 

It is a little early to refer to what is 
promised in the way of entertainment, but, 
when it is stated that §30,000 is spent 
annually on this department, visitors have 
ample guarantee that they will be abun- 
dantly provided for, and the admission to 
the Toronto Exhibition with its myraids of 
attractions is only 25c. 

Entries close on August 4, and prize lists 
can be had by addressing H. J. Hill, 
Manager, Industrial Exhibition, Toronto. 
As last year, so this, the exhibition will be 
inaugurated on Tuesday evening, August 
28, with a brilliant Military Tattoo. Re- 
duced rates will be given and excursions 
held on all lines of travel. 



THE SMALL BLAST FURNACES. 

Pig iron production was reduced 13,000 
tons last month, while the reduction in the 
number of furnaces in blast was only nine. 
This looks as if the blowing out of furnaces 
were due to other considerations than the 
decline in prices. The large furnaces can 
produce most economically ; it is the small 
furnaces that blew in last, after prices got 
high, and that were expected to blow out 
first as prices declined. No large number 
of them have been shaken out yet. If there 
is any profit at all for the small furnaces 
there must still be a good margin for the 
larger and more modern and better located 
ones, and the buying will hardly fail to 
revive when there is good reason for sup- 
posing that prices can go no lower without a 
large reduction of output. — New York 
Journal of Commerce. 



BIG CARGO FOR MANCHESTER. 

The Manchester Trader, which has 
cleared from Montreal for Manchester, has 
on board a large cargo, comprising 2,915 
bales 0/ pulp, 371 rolls of paper, 1,920 
doors, 3.500 bags of grape sugar, 9,522 
bushels oats, 68,000 bushels wheat, 410 
boxes of cheese, 254 bundles of dressed 
lumber, 742 packages boards, 121 packages 
of meat, 1,380 boxes of butter, 14 b«fifc*f 
boards, 19,508 deals, 599 bundles of hay, 
and 410 head of cattle. 



The merchants of Merritton, Ont., have 
agreed to close their stores every afternoon 
through July and August. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 

Portland 
Cements 



-~~ — BEST BRANDS. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Drain Pipes, 
Calcined Plaster, 

and a full stock of 

Builders' and Contractors' Supplies. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



W. McNally & Co. 



MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



U 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
laud" will rival in finality and grading tin- 
v.-Tv best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents : 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture - ""^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Out. 



CURKENT JVIA^ET QUOTATIONS 









July 27, 1900. 
These prices are for such qualities ami 
1 i mtitiea as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is anxious to b6 informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desiie 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 37 38 

traits 37 33 

Tlnplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.C., usual sizes $7 00 

IX., " 8 50 

„ I-X.X.. " 10 00 

Famous— 

JX... 8 50 

I.X.X 9 50 

Karen & Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 5 25 

IX., " 6 25 

I.X.X. " 7 25 

I-XXA., " 825 

D.C.. 12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. , usual sizes 4 60 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 85 

20x28 9 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C, 20x28, 112 sheets 9 50 

I. X., Terne Tin 1150 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb 
XX.,14x56,50sheetbxs ) 

" 14x60 » 001 07% 

•' 14x65, " ) ' 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08V, 

" 26 " 08% 09 

" 28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

_ Base Price 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs 2 00 2 10 

Refined " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 50 

Hocp steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 25 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 35 

Tire Steel 2 55 

Machinery 2 61 

,nv». w. steel, per lb 00 00 

Each /Calk Steel 2 8) 

.oujc j. ink Plates, 1-5 and thicker. 3 00 3 25 

rioiler Rivets 4 50 5 00 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inch 13 14 

2 " 15 16 

*% " 18 19 

3 " 19 20 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

% inoh 3 25 

3-16 inch 3 40 

*6 nch and thicker 3 25 

Black Sheets. 

IS gauge 3 20 

20 gauge 3 20 

22 to 24 " 3 30 

26 " 3 43 

28 " 360 



Canada Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 50 

Half polished 3 63 

All bright 4 00 

Iron Pipe. 

Discounts are as follows -Black pioe, ', to 
<& in., 41 per tent. % io., 60 per cent. % to 
2 in , 66- :l per cent, lirger sizes, 50 and 5 
per cent. Galvanized pipe, % •, 40 per 
cent. >i to 2 in , 50 per cent. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

■ Queen's 

G C. Comet. Ame Head 

16 gauge .... 4 4 25 

18 to 24 gauge 4 50 4 23 » 4 50 

26 " 4 75 4 45 1 40 4 75 

28 " 5 00 4 70 4 60 5 00 

Less than case lots. 15c. per 100 lb. additional 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 
Proof Coil, 3-16in., per 1001b 

«H. .. '.'. ■•• 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 85 5 35 

% " " 4 8J 5 30 

" 7-16 ' " 4 50 4 95 

(j .'.' 463 

% " 4 20 

\ " - 4 15 

7 « " " 3 70 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p c 

Trace chain 25 and 5 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 19% 20% 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cutlengths, ound, % to%in. 23% 25 
1 ' round and square 

1 to 2 inches 23% 25 

Sheet. 
TJntinned ,14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 23 23% 

TJntinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz, irregular sizes 23 23'/4 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4 x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25% 

35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boiler ami T. K. Pitts. 

P ain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 
Roll and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge. 10 percent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base. Der lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 07 07% 

Domestic " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 06% 

Part casks 07 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 05 05' 4 

Bar, 1 lb 06 l <i 

heeU, 2%lh». «q. ft., by roll 053, 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., ' 05% 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. fob. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths ists at 7% cents. 



Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per HO lb. ; chilled, 87. CO 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% pc Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on medium and extra 
heavy, and 45 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb 

Bar half-and-half 21% 2i % 

Refined 21 21% 

Wiping 20% 21 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 

quantity. The prices of other qualities of 

aolder in the market indicated by private 

brandsvary according to composition. 

Antimony , 

Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Percwt 
Pure, Assoc, guarantee, ground in oil 

25 lb. irons 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50" 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No.4do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. k=gs, per cwt 5 00 

'White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 0(9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks , 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 6 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %. % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 135 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 120 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 19 

Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre ( J. C.) bbls .... 135 140 

Yellow Ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), percwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, percwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt .. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, percwt 175 2 00 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93 D c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" TJmber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre 03^i 

T'ltramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb .... 07 



Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45, lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per lb 07 

100-lb . lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or bxs 2 25 

Bulk in bbls., per 100 1 95 

Bulk in less quantities 2 10 

25-lb. tins, 4 in case 2 35 

12%-lb. tins, 8 in case 2 60 

Varnishes. 

(In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 8 00 9 10 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, txtra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 160 2 CO 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 10 3 60 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 83 

" orange 400 440 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 fo 2 CO 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

" No. 1 1 63 2 CO 

Discount- general trade discount, f0 per 
cent and tour months' time: i,e<ial cash 
discount of 3 per cent in thiity clays, or 3y, 
per ceLt. spot cash. 

The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's, Limited 
Elastilite Varnish, 
1 gal. can, each. 
•*2 03. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2.00. 

Maple Leaf 

Coach Enamels ; 

1. fOc. : 

Size 2. 35c. : Size 

3, ICc. each. 




VARNISH 



" -'■■ 



Linseed Oil. 

Raw. Boiled 

1 to ( bbls delivered $0 86 $0 8 

5to9bbla_ " 85 8 

Montreal." Toronto, Hamilton, Quebec, 
London, Ottawa, Kingston and Gueli.h. 
2c. less. 

Tnrpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... 71 

!• to 4 barrels " " .... 70 

T oronto, Hamilton, London, Guelpb,2c. less. 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb.. 10 10% 

" " small lots 1'.. 11 

Cod Oil, Etc 

Cod Oil, per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 1 20 

" Neatsfoot 

Glne. 

Common 08y, 09 

French Medal OH ' 14% 

Cabinet, sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 022 030 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner IS 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL, PEECH & TOZER, luu 

Phoenix Special Steel Works. The Ickles, near Sheffield, England. 

Manufacturers of^ ^a^^, 

Axles and Forgings of all descriptions, Billets and Spring 
Steel, Tyre, Sleigh Shoe and Machinery Steel. m ~ 

Sole Agents for Canada. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition • 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Caps. Dom., 50 and 5 per cent. 
Rim Fire Pistol, diB. 45 p. o., Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Rim Fire, Military, net list, Amer. 
Central Kire Pistol and Rifle, 18 p.o. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom- 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Oartr'dges, Sporting and Mill 

tarv, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer, 
net list. B.B. Gaps, discount 45 per cent. 
Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.o. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 and 10 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads. por lb. 

Best, thick white folt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-.b. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of oUO each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin oard wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and K gauges 7U 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each- 
It and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5and6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Anvils., lb. t'9 09% 
Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 

Angers. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 p.o. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 5 5) 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 0J 

Bench Axes, 40 and 15 p c. 
Broad Axes, 33% percent. 

Hunters' Axe3 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gro38 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 390 4 00 

Copper, discount 40 and 10 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5>/,-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A perlb. 27 

B " 21 

C " ny 2 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 68% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 27% per oent. 



Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 percent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Roekford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per cross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nnts. Percent. 

Norway Bolls, full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, full square 65 

•' " " 5-15 and under 60 

" " % and larger 55 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts, square 4c off 

Nuts, hexagon 4 Vic. off 

Tire Bolts 6u 

Stove Bolts 60and 10 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 55 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

B utchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred rooting, per 100 lb 160 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 80 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 CO 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6u per cent 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per oent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Billiards, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulio 1 00 1 10 

Chalk. 
Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 



Chisels. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 

Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
Churns . 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— IVo. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, £8 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days, 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fit tings 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 4 75 
Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout.... 5 25 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Richelieu 4 75 

Emb. Richelieu 5 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 65 

" oval,17xl4in 155 

" " 19x15 in 2 30 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, diB. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. &D., No. 3, per pair :...17% 

" 5. " 22% 



5, 



15 
.20 



Boynton pattern " 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 0U 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis.. 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard, dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No.l.perdoz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz 1 60 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 27% per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FAC TORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 per cent, to 60. 

10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent 
revised list. 

FRUIT PRESSES. 

Henis', per doz 3 25 3 50 

Shepard's Queen City, dis. 15 per cent. 
GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 00 

26 to 40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 01 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 75 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86to90 7 25 .... 14 CO 

91to95 15 50 

96tol00 18 00 

101tol05 2100 

106toll0 24 00 

llltoll5 28 00 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % '• 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 1 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, — per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 08% 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

• Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " .... 06% 

" " 6-in., " ... 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pair 

Spring 12 U0 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. • 

Cast Iron. 'k 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 1 iV*. 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 £1 >" 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat., per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand 50 p.c. dis. L„. . - 
"M" brand 50 p.c. f ° Tal head - 

Acadian, ountersunk head and oval 
top, 50 and 10 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






MALEHAM & YEOMANS, 



Highest Award. 



manufacturers of_ 




Table Cutlery, Razors, 
Scissors, Butcher Knives 
and Steels, Palette and 
Putty Knives. 



SPECIALTY : 



Exposition Unlverselle, Paris, 1880. 



Cases of Carvers and 
Cabinets of Cutlery. 



SHEFFIELD, 
^ ENGLAND. 

► - • ■ *$. 

►_• *A**ANT f/) 

^> ^T "W BRAD SHAW fcSOM 

Granted I780. 

— ■ K 



WHOLESALE ONLY. 



F.H.SCOTT, 360 Temple Building, MONTREAL. 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. S 65 3 99 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 IS 

Staal shoes. 

Light 3 85 4 10 

Featherweight (all .sizes) 5 10 5 10 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Ouelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Starperdoz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lh 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 27% p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

" KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 3 75 3 25 

Bronze Geuuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, P. A L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door kn >bs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

L\MP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined, 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 J 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Pish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis. 33' i p.c. 

Russell A Erwin, per doz 3 05 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 
English and Am., per doz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 15 to 17'.. p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Plat head, discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS 

Canadian, per doz 8 50 100 

s»~ "* MEAT CUTTERS. 

Each berican, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
h»ok /-German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 60 $4 10 

3d 3 25 » 77 

4 and 5d 3 00 3 60 

6 and 7d 2 90 .(45 

8and9d 2 75 3 25 

10 and 12d 2 70 3 2) 

16and20d 2 65 3 15 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 CO 3 10 

Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per oent. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis J5 par cent 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 185 3 50 



NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and ootagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 40 and 5 per oent. for MoMullen's. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U.S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Canada refined (Toronto) 13% 

Saraia Water White 15 

Pratt's Astral 18 

Sarnia, Prime White 14 

American w. w 16% 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zino and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAIL8. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per oent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per oent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
PICKS. 

P. r doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 1 50 3 00 

Brass head, " .... 40 1 00 

PLANES. 
Wood, benoh, Canadian dis. 55 per cent. 

American dis. 55. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or Amerioan, 37% 

to 40 per oent. 
l!aiIey's(Stan. R. * L. Co.), 50 to 50 and 5 p.c. 
Miscellaneous, dis. 25 to 27% per cent. 
Bailey's Victor, 25 par oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per dos 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.o. 
Button s Imitation, per doz. . 5 00 9 00 
German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Impression work, discount, 60 per cant. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 percent- 
Jenkins' disk globe and anglj valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 
Standard valves, discount, 80 per per cent. 
Jenkins' radiator valves discount 55 per cent. 
" " standard, <lis, 80 p.c. 

Quick opening valves, discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 60 

No. 4%. " 3 00 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Sorew 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS 

Canadian cistern 130 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 1 00 

RANGE BOILERS 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 7 25 

35 " 8 15 

40 " 9 25 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

'' 35 » 26 00 

" 40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable Canadian list dis. 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 



RA8PS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 
RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade 4 Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile 4 Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 CIO 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURKS. 
Carriage, Section, Wagon Box Rivets, etc., 

50 p.c. 
Black M. Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-1 b. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets & Burrs, 35 p.c. dis., and 

cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets in 

%-lb. oartons, lc. per lb. 
Burrs, iron or steel, 45 per cent. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 
7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9% 13% 

%ia 10% 14% 

%and5-16in 12 15% 

Cotton base, %-inch and 

larger 14% 15 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New ealaod Rope 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished U 75 

No. 50, nickle-plated.... 80 
Usual rebate on 12 and 50 1 are lots. 
SAND A»D EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
BAA. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAW8. 
Hand, Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. A D , 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. 4 D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 3 25 

Solid, " 150 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES 
Gurney Scales, 45 p.c. 
B. S. It M. Scales, 45 p.o. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. U , iron, and steel, 80 p.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 75 p.c. 
" F. H, brass, dis. 75 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 67%p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 67% p.c. 
RH. " 62% p.c. 

Drive 8crews, 80 per cent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

8CYTHE8. 
Discount, per doz, net 9(0 15 00 



SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS 
Bailey Cutlery Co , full ni< keled, dis. 69 p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Heinisch, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Seymour or Heinisch tailor shears. 15 p.c 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per edit. 

8NAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, lVi 11).. per 11, 37 

lb. or over, per lb o 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52 j 

STAMPED WARE. 
riuin, dis., 75 and 12V.;, p.c off revised list. 
Returned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

Plain 00 3 45 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 C7 

„ " . slip 09 09 

Labrador fj 13 

_ ," Axa 15 

Turkey o 50 

Arkansas 00 1 50 

Water-ofAyr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

6 inch Per 100 lengths goo 

7 imD " '.'.'.'. 8 50 

Stove Polish. 




No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash $4 80 

No. 6 — 3 dozen in case, '* .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Percent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 ,t 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80;. 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued SO A 5 

tinned 10 

" (in ketfs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ..75 A 15 

" % weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers, bulk - I 

" bni h, Uned 4 tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued tinned and 

japanned 75 4 12% 

Zinc tacks 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52% 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN 



PITTSBURGH, 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



CHAIN 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



t>roof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, PanQ(1ian p onr „ aT1 t Q t,w A. C. LESLIE & CO., 
Montreal. -Canadian Representatives- MontrBa i 



Montreal 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 






For other Provinces 




Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Ulout nails, blued and tinned 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tuftinj buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz — 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather ... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson'a per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 2> p c. 
Oame, H. &N., P. S. k W.. 65 p.c. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 21 

Wrapping, mottled, per pack. 50 60 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb 17 18 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cenr. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granitp or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $3.00 per 100 

Hi. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, d 



vance 7c. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advance 7c— No. 11, 14c— No. 12, 
20c.-No. 13, 35c —No. 14. 47c— No. 15, 
60c— No. 16,75c Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, Sp- 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire. 30c 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c- in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c — 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. )5 per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, $5- No. 18, $5.50-No. 19. $6-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, $7— No. 21, $7.30— No. 23, 
$7.65-No. 24, 88— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
*9.50— No. 27, SlO-No. 28 fll-No 29. 
$12- No. 30, $13— No. 31, $14— No 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $fi. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, 10c— in 25-l>\ bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in H-lb. hanks, 75c— in Vi-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, perlOO lb.— Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.95 
No. 9, 33.20-No. 10, $4.10-No. 11, $4.15 
No. 12, $3 35-No. 13, $3.45-No. 14, 
$4 50— No. 15, $5.00— No. 16. $5.25. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 

per 1,000 feet 3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B 
Galvanized, 4 barb, 2% and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 25 

Galvanized b»rh, f.o.b. ■ levelaLd, $2.95 in 

If-ss tban ca-lotp, i nd $3.C5 in carlots. 

Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 

Roes braid truss cable 4 50 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. . 2 00 
Terras, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37V, per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 50 to 25 p.c 
Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., perdoz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 0U 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent.; terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 
Canadian make, discount, 25 per cent. 



ESTABLISHED 18GO. 



INCOEPOEATED 1895. 



Enamelled Ware 





We make 7 Different Qualities : 

"Crescent" 
"Premier" 
"Princess" 
White 
Blue and White 
"Star" Decorated 
White Decorated 

"Crescent" Steel Agateware takes the lead. It is a light mottled grey color, and, owing to the 
ingredients used in the manufacture of this ware, it is not brittle and will not chip or burn. K 

The large variety of our lines are unequalled. Principal lines are carefully packed in crates 01 
y 2 or i dozen, thus insuring purchaser safe delivery. 

Catalogues and Prices on Application. 



THE TH0S. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



SEND for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthly Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The uliUnt 
established and moat successful medium in i be world. 
Established 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to tho«e who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference by a large number 
of Hrms. It is consequently a most valuable adv 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers Subscription , 
t'.« per annum, price per copy, 6d. Solo Proprietor, I'm IB, 
D. PHILLIPS, M.I M.K.. Newport. Hon., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon.' 

WHY sharpen your bar of sleel ? 
USE only "Aylmer Drills." 
OLD fashioned drills waste time and money. 
WAYS change as inventions multiply 
Send for circular and prices to 
WM. J. CRAWFORD, 
Cji 39, Canada Life Building, MONTREAL. 



HrT. ..l 



R C. LeVESCONTE 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc 

The McKinnon Building 
Cor. Jordan and Melinda Streets 



. . . TORONTO 



Telephone 689. 

Cable "LeVesconte" Toronto. 



To Cycle Makers 
and the Public: 

Notice is hereby given that J and 
H. M. Copeland's patented " Im- 
provements in Sprocket Wheel 
Clutches," No. 61918, Free Wheel 
Device, can be obtained from 

The Wortman and Ward Manufacturing Co, 

Limited 
LONDON, ONTARIO, CANADA 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO. 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, 
and endorsed as follows: "Alterations of and additions 
to Newspaper Sorting Room, also Elevator Tower, Union 
Station. Toronto," will be received at this office until 
Tuesday, the 31st July, instant. 

Plans can be seen and a form of tender and all necessary 
information obtained at this Department, and at the office 
of S. G. Curry, Esq , Architect, Toronto, Ont. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not 
be considered unless made on the forms supplied, and 
ied with their actual signatures. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted 
bank cheque made payable to the order of the Honour- 
able 1 he Minister of Public Works, equal to ten per 
cent. (icV) of the amount of the tender, which will be 
forfeited if the party decline to enter into a contract 
when called upon to do so, or if he fail to complete the 
work contracted for. If the tender be not accepted the 
cheque will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order, 

JOS. R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, 20th July, 1500. 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity from the Department, will not be paid for it. (30) 



7S YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1823. 



75 YEAKS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. EiS A ^.?. FF i c f:A 90 Ch " nbe " su 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



)ARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,506,000. Offices throughout the oiviliied world. 

Executive Offices : 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the con- 
trolling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may In; defined as of the merchants, by the 
merchants, tor the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information, no effort is spared, and no 
reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an authority on all matters affecting 
commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It rarnlabea 
Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fidurlaiy and business corporations. Bpedflo 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY 



Toronto Office : Cor. Melinda and Jordan Sts. 
Hamilton Office : No. 39 James Street South. 
London Office : No. 365 Richmond Street. 



Winnipeg Office : No. 398 Main Street. 
Vancouver Office: Cor. Hastings and Hamilton Sta. 
Victoria Office : Board of Trade Building. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen.-Mgr., Western Canada, Toronto, Ont. 



THE 



Waggoner 
Extension Ladder. 




The strongest, lightest and most convenient ladder In the market. The only really satisfactory extension ladder 
made. Pulls up with a rope. Made in all lengths. Also extension and other step ladders, sawborses, ironing 
boards, painters' trestles, etc. All first-class goods. Write for quotations to 

The Waggoner Ladder Company, Limited, London, Ont. 



PERFECTION 
AUTOMATIC 
REVOLVER. 



NEW Automatic shell extracting, 
"" fc double action, small frame. 

Weighs 12 oz. Rebounding lock. 32 
caliber. 5 shot. 

Made with shorter barrel for bicycle 
use. 

The most perfect small pistol made. 




Forehand 
Arms Co. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



Manufacturers of 
the 

Forehand Guns 

Worcester, 
Mass. 



ROUND RE-ACTING 
WASHER 



Quickest selling Washing Machine on the 

market. 
None more satisfactory to dealers or users. 
Every home requires a good Washing 

Machine. 
Every Merchant should handle them. 
Prices and full particulars on application. 



THE . . 



Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 

Limited. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents : W. L. Haldimand & Son, 
Montreal, Que. 





fee. IMS 



!! 



: 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



THERE ARE A DOZEN DIFFERENT KINDS OF 

SOLID RUBBERTIRES 

FOR CARRIAGES. 



Ninety per cent, of all the 
Rubber Tires in use in New 
York City are the 



"Kelly- 
Springfield." 

WHY? 




JPATZNTED. 



t 




*%>%'+%>%>%>%*'%>%>%*%'%>+n 



Sole Manufacturers in Canada 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 

61-63 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO, ONT. 

Factories— 115-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



Ingot Tin, 

"BANCA" 

Ingot Tin, 

"LAMB & FLAG" 

Ingot Copper, 
Zinc Spelter, 
Sheet Zinc, 
Antimony, 
Pig Lead. 

From Stock and to Import. 

Enquiries Solicited. 



B.&S. H.THOMPSON &C0'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 



/wwwvw»'wvw**>ww\*<w 



GALVANIZED CORRUGATED SHEETS 
"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



V*.'- 



<VV>/»/V\,V'»/VVVVVVV'V'VVV» WW* 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 

...Limited 

LONDON, EJSG. 

Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Gauge and Lubricator Glasses, 
Langwell's Manufacture, 

Montreal 



%&&&&&> xa$ 







The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XII 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, AUGUST 4, 1900 



NO. 31 



"TIBET ANTi-FRlCTIOH METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
Toe Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH A McNAUGHTON. 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smellers of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




the QUEEN'S the HEAD 



OF THE EMPIRE 



s 



AND 



a 



Queen's Head 

IS THE BEST IRON USED 
IN THE EMPIRE. 



LA±±±M 




CANADA 






BRISTOL, ENG . 
and MONTREAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, LIMITED^^H 

A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, MONTREAL. 



PROSPERITY 




-*V 



\ 



One thing is certain — the contractor who installs The 
Safforcr' Radiators wins the confidence of those whom he deals 
with. " Confidence begets success," and success means " pros- 
perity." The " Safford " is the original invention in screw- 
threaded nipple connections for Steam and Hot Water heating 

—all others are imitators. The " Safford ** cannot leak, 

because there are no rods, bolts or packings. 

Think of the damage to a contractor's reputation that the 
installation of leaky radiators can do ! 



The Safford Radiators 



have been recommended 
by the leading architects in the country — they have been installed in the largest 
public buildings — they have received the highest awards at all public exhibitions 
since the World's Fair. We have a free illustrated booklet which we would like to 
send you, because we believe that there is "prosperity " ahead for every contractor 
or dealer who will read it. Every statement in the booklet is backed up by the 
largest Radiator manufacturers under the British flag — 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited 
Toronto, Ontario. 






Fishing Tackle 



II Ut tl MH t 



TROLLING LINES 
RODS and REELS 
BAIT PAILS 
HOOKS 
LANDING NETS 
DISGORGERS, Etc. 



Sporting Goods 



************ 



BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

GOLFING 

TENNIS 

CRICKET 

QUOITS 



S 
U 

P 
P 

L 
I 

E 
S 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 

Cor. King and Victoria Sts., 



INI 



^fflimrnmwifnfnirw^ 



& 



THE 



Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 



OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 



Manufacturers of 



I Bar Iron and Steel 

| Nails, Spikes 

| Horse Shoes . . 

I Bolts, Washers, etc. 



\ 



Belleville 



3 

3 



3 



) 



Ontario. I 



3 
^ 
3 



tfllUWUJttiUlUUlUI^^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARi: AND METAL 



ISLAND CITY 




The best way for a hardware dealer to insure the success 
of his business is to handle 

The Island City Mixed Paints 
Floor Paint dries hard in 8 hours 
The Island City Varnishes 
The Island City White Lead 
The Island City Pure Colors in Oil 
and Japan. 

Customers are sure when they buy our Island City Paints 
that they get the best value for their money. 

P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, ""MUff"* 

TORONTO, HALIFAX, WINNIPEG. 



THRESHING 
BELTS 





s'« 








with these brands 
insure the best 
of wear for the 
money. 



The Canadian Rubber 
Co. of Montreal, 



MONTREAL, 




*X; 




MONTREAL, y63»\xT»A*<?<V 
TORONTO, ^K ^ £> 

wiNNippn 'SSls. »»akv> .<$V 



WINNIPEG. 






SOME OF THE NEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




NO. 41 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN HANDLE. 

W 1 




NO. 42 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN BOX. 




NO. 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, FOR WOOD OR METALS. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you experience difficulty with other twine, 

try "Plymouth." 



TRADE 




MARK 



U 



THE STAMP OF EXCELLENCE." 



HARVEST TIME. 



We can fill repeat orders with great promptness, as we have Binder 
Twine stocks at London, Toronto and Ottawa. 

Order as you sell, every day, and telegraph (expense) when in a hurry. 



°£l ibutors: PLYMOUTH BINDER TWINE AGENCY, 54 Ba, TO st RON To 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



We carry in stock a full line of the following goods : 



Antimony. 

Brass— Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 

Copperine and Babbitt. 

Cotton Waste. 

Crucibles. 

Eave Trough— Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 

Glue— English and French. 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron— Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 

Galvanized, "Gordon" Crown and "Apollo," 

Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 
Iron Pipe— Black and Galvanized. 
Lead— Bar, Pig and Sheet. 
Lead Pipe. 

Solder— Half and Half and Standard. 
Steel Sheets— Common and Dead Flat. 
Tin Plates— Charcoal and Coke. 
Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, "L. & F." and Straits. 
Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 
Zinc — Sheets and Block. 

PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ICE CREAM FREEZERS 



The Latest 
and Best. 

The 
"Ideal" 

will make cream in two 
to five minutes, accord- 
ing to quantity. 

SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 
VERY RAPID 
ECONOMICAL 



Write for Circular and 
Prices. 




Wood,Yallance&Co.,fii&M 



Branch House : George D. Wood & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto Office: 88 York Street— H. T. Eager. 



r 














* 


TTfl 


»- 


-- 















WOOD, VALLANCE * CO.. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



GEO. D. WOOD & CO., 

Iron Merchants 

Importers of British and Foreign 

HARDWARE. 

WINNIPEG, Canada 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 



Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables and 



Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"FIRMUS" 
Orders will 



Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila hemp obtainable, 
not be accented for second quality or "mixed" goods. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



Toronto Branch 27 FRONT ST. WEST. 
TEL. 94. Wm. B. Stewart, Agent. 



Montreal, Que. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING BY WARM AIR 

is the title of one of our new catalogues, now ready for distribution. It covers 
the complete field, describing our different furnaces, already favorably known, 
and introduces our latest construction : 

"THE OXFORD 400 SERIES" 

This new line is supplied either Portable, or Stationary for brick setting, and 
will be found eminently satisfactory — its improved features being specially inter- 
esting and gratifying to all experienced furnace men. 

Our Little Ox and Oxford Wood Furnaces, in popular use all over the 
country, are also fully described in this new booklet. 

If you have not received one, send us your address. 

We are now ready for Fall Orders in these reliable lines. 

Let us hear from you. 



THE GURNEY F-QUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



THE AUER GASOLINE 
LAMP 



100 CANDLE-POWER. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR 

MONEY REFUNDED. 

Approved by Canadian Fire Under- 
writers' Association. 



Send for Catalogue. 



NO. 5 
PRICE $7.00. 



AUER 
LIGHT 
CO., 

MONTREAL. 




. . . Defiance 

Cold 

Blast 

Lantern 




With Patent Fluted 
Plate, by which the air is 
admitted so as to come in 
contact with the Globe, so 
tending to keep it cool. 

Sold by Leading 
Jobbers. 

Manufactured by. 



W. W. CHOWN & CO. 



Belleville, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A/ A. V #.,/^J. 






THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
i, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 

Root 




B askets 

THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO. 



it 



Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder 



M 



The cleanest, quickest and best of all. Hard grain, quick ignition, i 
combustion, slight residuum, no corroding of gun barrel or locks, high 
velocity, even pattern, great .penetration, minimum pressure and recoil. 

Excellent keeping qualities, not affected by climatic influences. 

Safe, reliable, accurate, and pleasant to shoot. 

Absolutely Smokeless. i6-oz. to the pound. 

FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS WRITE TO 

HARRY C. MARLATT, Gen,,,,! fetes Agent, SI/VICOE, ONT. 



ROUND RE-AGTING 
WASHER 



Quickest selling Washing Machine on the 

market. 
None more satisfactory to dealers or users. 
Every home requires a good Washing 

Machine. 
Every Merchant should handle them. 
Prices and full particulars on application. 



THE 



Dowswell Manufacturing Co, 

Limited. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Son, 
Montreal, Que. 




THE SPRING TRADE 



+ *** 
+ *** 
* + ** 
+ *** 




To secure thoroughly reliable goods send 
your orders for 

Ready-Mixed House and Floor Paints, 
Varnishes, Japans, Coach Colors, 
White Lead, Colored Paints, Enamels, 
Wood Stains, Wall Tints, Putty, etc. 



To 



Henderson & Potts, 



NOVA SCOTIA PAINT AND 

VARNISH WORKS, 



HALIFAX, and 747 Craig St.. MONTREAL. 



Sole Agents for the 
Dominion for 



Brandram's Celebrated White Lead. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Pipe Ttaaig . . 



AND 




This cut represents our s l A and 6 x / 2 
Combined Hand and Power Pipe Threading 
and Cutting Machine. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOGUE ^^ 

THE FAIRBANKS 
COMPANY 

749 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



Kemps 

STANDARD 
ONE-PIECE ELBOWS. 

Introduced to the trade in 1897 and proved to be the best 
Stove Pipe Elbow ever produced. 

They are made out of Extra Heavy Smooth Steel in two 
qualities. 

The improved process of manufacture produces a short turn, 
therefore less material is used, and, consequently, less weight per 
dozen, which results in a great reduction in freight, and a re- 
duced cost to the buyer. 

Made in STEEL, in 5, 6, 7 and 8-inch. 

Made in GALVANIZED IRON, in 7 and 8-inch. 

Made in TIN, in 7 and 8-inch. 




Strongest Elbow made. 
Attractive in appearance. 
Coated so as to prevent rust. 
Riveted ready for use. 
Will not get damaged in shipping. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



Toronto, 
Canada. 




VOL XII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO. AUGUST 4, 1900 NO. 31. 

President, we have gone on the assumption that the lines of demarcation are concerned there 

IOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. contrary was the underlying principle of are none. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. good government. The great question with the one is how 

Limited. WCi as a rulC( giye our VQtes t0 meri> not to keep in ; with the other, how to get in. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- i» „.. „.i j »v.«.» £— «. _«..*_.:_.. „,, „.,->l™<- rs( 

._ ., ,„;,•_„ . ._. hwaii«»» nf thpir nartirnlar fitn#»«s tn It should therefore occasion no qualms ot 

culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, Decause 01 ineir particular nineSS 10 "i 

North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, represent us in Parliament, but, because conscience to ignore the party when the 

Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. . 

island and Newfoundland. they bear the stamp of the particular party P art y ignores those principles which underlie 

0FFI0M to which we profess allegiance. g° od government. 

MONTREAL - - • - Board of Trade Building, 

Toronto 16 Fron T t e s e t?e h e°t n we"; As to whether this or that candidate is WILL THE PRICE OF IRON PIPE 

London, enq. - - - - 109 Fleet streeT'EX^ possessed of ordinary business common- BE FIXED? 

Manchester, enq. - - . , 8 S J «' An"£; sense scarcely ever enters our mind. A MOTHER attempt is being made 

winnipfo w».t,r^'r S «'ntH^ b Ri'nrv" „, L . „ , . f~\ this week to induce the wholesale 

Winnipeg .... Western Canada Block. Were the same methods employed by £ \ 

ST. john, n. B. - - - No. 3 Market Whari! ,,,„.,,„,,.„ ,„, „ . ■ .- „ mmn tn dealers to arrive at some agree- 

J I Hunter 'White shareholders when appointing men to 

new york. is'o Nassau street! . .- r /- • 1 .1 ment regarding the price of iron pipe. 

Edwin H. Haven. tne directorate of a financial or mercantile 

_ ... „ . . .... .. , ... It will be remembered that a few weeks 

Travelling Subscription Agents : institution there would soon be a winding- 

T. Donaghy. f. s. Millard. . ag0 an understanding was arrived at 

Subscription. Canada and the United State,. $2.00. Upof affairs. But they do not do those ... . . . . . . 

Great Briuin and esewh,. i Js . things in financial and mercantile circles. Wherebv the CUttmg m P " CeS WhlCh had 

fubiianed «vor> Saiurday. ... r- . ,r r . been going on for some months was sup- 

Having first the welfare of the concern at » o 

Cable Address J Adscript, London posed to have been stopped. But, as all 

1 Adscript, Canada. heart in which they are financially interested, 

..... , hardwaremen are probably aware, it proved 

they appoint as directors the men who are 

,,_,,. . . to be only of a very temporary character, 

deemed best fitted for the position. 

_ , _ ,. , for, before the agreement was two weeks old, 

Before we can secure a Parliament, the 

. . , , , , it was broken. And the conditions are 

majority of whose members are character - 

. , , , now almost, if not fully, as bad as they 

lzed for the business commonsense they 

, ... were before. 

■ — possess and not for the commonsense which 

TRE RESPONSIBLE OF BUSINESS they lack, this same principle must govern Th<5 preSCnt a " empt t0 pUt * St ° P l ° thC 

MEN. ... , indiscriminate cutting of prices is only what 

us when selecting representatives for the 

EVERY citizen must share in the , „ is to be expected under the circumstances. 

House of Commons, 
responsibility for the good or bad T , . .... , ,, . One meeting was held in Toronto on 

In doing this it does not follow that we 
government of a country, but there is ,,,,.,,. , . . Wednesday, and another is being held as 

should bid adieu to the particular party 
- »o class upon whom the responsibility rests . , . ,. . „ we go to press. What the outcome is, 

whose tenets we profess to believe in. But 
heavier than upon the mercantile class. . . , ,, . . therefore, we cannot say. 

it does follow that we must be prepared to 

The work of governing a village, a city. refuse t0 support its candidates when it per . What started th * cu » in i ° f P* c « ™> ™ 

a township, a county, a province or a sis ts in nominating candidates who are lack- d ° Ubt ' th<5 eff ° rtS ° f the manufacturers in 

nation demands the employment of sound ing in lhe quality of business commonsense . the United Slat ^ t0 S et int0 this market 

and ordinary business principles, not of After all, however, the two political parties when Jobber s' stocks were, as a rule, heavy, 

abstract theoretical schemes, elaborate and in Canada are more defined by the names When a merchant is selHng his goods at 

y ' they carry than by the principles they bottom prices he is in danger of scraping 

By our practices, if not by our professions, enunciate. In fact, as far as economical the bottom out of his business. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE TRADE SITUATION IN CANADA. 



A FEW months ago business men 
were occupied in considering pre- 
sent business conditions, and plan- 
ning how best they could cope with them. 
In other words, how they could supply the 
demand. 

To day, while trade is active for the time 
of year, a good deal of consideration is being 
given to the question as to what the future 
of business will be. Are dull times near at 
hand or far off? 

Business conditions are certainly not 
exactly the same as they were a year ago. 
There is not that rush and excitement that 
there was, as a result of the abnormal de- 
mand and the rapid appreciation in values 
that characterized many branches of trade. 

But it must be remembered that the con- 
ditions then ruling were not normal. They 
were decidedly abnormal. And the abnor- 
mal is no more perpetual than the snow of 
January. 

The condition of trade is certainly more 
normal now than it was then. But a nor- 
mal trade does not mean hard times. 

Some time in the future we shall, no 
doubt, again pass through hard times, if the 
experience of the past is any criterion. 

In Canada, at the moment, the most dis- 
couraging feature is the wheat crop outlook 
in Manitoba. It is, undoubtedly, bad. 
Owing to the want of rain, when there is 
usually plenty, it is the general estimate 
that the yield will be 40 to 50 per cent, 
short of that of last year. It was at one 
time thought that the crop of fodder would 
also be seriously short, but the rains, while 
not early enough to materially benefit the 
wheat crop, insured an ample supply of feed 
for the live stock. Oats and barley also 
promise to yield well, but, of course, the 
yield in those cereals cannot fully compen- 
sate for the loss in the wheat crop. 

But mixed farming has developed a great 
deal of late years in Manitoba, particularly 
in the dairying branch, and the loss from 
the wheat crop will not be by any means so 
serious as it would have been a few years 
ago. It is serious enough, at any rate, no 
matter how we look at it. 

Cereal crops in the Northwest Territories 
are about as promising as those in Manitoba 



are unpromising, all reports from there 
indicating a large yield. The dairying and 
stock-raising industries there are also 
developing in a satisfactory manner. 

In Ontario, the wheat crop is not a heavy 
one, but it is a good one nevertheless, and 
particularly as far as quality is concerned. 
Other grains are most promising, while the 
fruit crop, taking it all round, is a bountiful 
one. Roots are also yielding well. The 
dairying industry of the Province is in a 
most thriving condition. 

The hay crop of the Province of Quebec 
will be equal, if not in excess, to that of last 
year. The grain crops are looking well and 
fair root crops are predicted. 

Down in the Maritime Provinces the hay 
crop is a beautiful one, and the fruit trees 
are yielding liberally. An excellent crop of 
apples is assured in Nova Scotia, that im- 
portant apple producing country. 

Out in British Columbia, the agricultural 
industry, which includes stock-raising, fruit- 
growing, etc., is making steady develop- 
ment. But, of course, mining is the principal 
industry in that Province. As everyone 
knows, the metalliferous mining there has 
been quiet, owing largely to certain mining 
laws passed by the Provincial Legislature 
in regard to labor, but recovery is being 
made from this, and it is asserted that in 
the precious metals the present year will be 
a record one. In the coal mining industry 
the activity is most pronounced. On Van- 
couver Island the demand exceeds the 
supply, and from the information that comes 
to us from Nova Scotia, much the same 
condition of affairs prevails there. 

The lumber industry from one end of the 
Dominion to the other is in a healthy con- 
dition, and the demand for home and foreign 
requirements is likely to take care of all the 
mills can turn out. 

The railway returns and the reports of 
the clearing houses are pretty reliable bar- 
ometers of the present conditions of trade. 
These do not show a steady increase from 
week to week, yet, they are satisfactory. 

The gross earnings of the Grand Trunk 
for the first six months of the year aggre- 
gated # 10, 842, 746, compared with #10,076,- 
802 for the same period in 1899. Those of 



the Canadian Pacific Railway were #14, 107,- 
038 and #12,688,362 respectively. 

The bank clearings some weeks show 
increases and others again decreases, but 
they are larger than they were two years 
ago. The clearings for the first six months 
of the year were 2.5 per cent, less than 
during the same period in 1899, the figure - 
being #763,822,002 and #784,277,759 
respectively. The monthly bank returns are, 
as a rule, of a favorable character, and an 
increase of nearly by z millions in the note 
circulation of June over the same month of 
1899 is certainly indicative of active trade. 

There is certainly nothing alarming in the 
situation as far as Canada is concerned. In 
fact, there is a great deal that should impart 
confidence. But it is well that business men 
should be careful and not hoist too much 
sail. 



HOW THEY DO IT IN ENGLAND. 

WHILE they may not always do so, 
yet the people of Great Britain 
quite frequently elect to public 
positions men who have earned reputations 
as practical and successful business men. 
We only wish the disposition was as marked 
in the people of Canada. 

London, England, daily papers to hand 
contain reports of a meeting of the livery- 
men, held there for the purpose of electing 
two sheriffs for the city. 

Nine gentlemen were nominated and not 
one of them was any other than a practical 
business man. Had the nomination taken 
place in this country, ten chances to one, 
every nominee would have been a lawyer, 
a professional politician or a " gentleman" 
without visible means of support. 

One of the gentlemen elected was Mr. 
Alderman Vaughan-Morgan, a member of 
the cutlery firm of Morgan Bros., founders 
and proprietors of The Ironmonger and The 
Chemist, two of Great Britain's leading 
trade journals. The other was Mr. JosephV- 
Lawrence, gold and silver wire drawer, and 
also closely associated with the British press 
and several manufacturing concerns. 

Both these men are successful business 
men, and we may safely presume that to 
this fact is due their appointment to the 
honorable office of sheriffs of the great city 
of London. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN BOLTS WANTED IN GREAT BRITIAN. 



WE have before us copies of some 
recent correspondence which has 
passed between Mr. Harrison Wat- 
son, curator of the Canadian section of the 
Imperial Institute, and a Glasgow commis- 
*i-m firm, regarding bolts and nuts of Cana- 
dian manufacture. 

Great Britain is an importer of nuts and 
bolts, and a year or more ago Hardware 
and Metal referred to the fact that 
inquiries had been received here from Great 
Britain asking for quotations for round lots. 
At that time the manufacturers in Canada 
were so pressed with orders on home 
account that they were not in a position to 
give the export trade little if any con- 
sideration. 

Now, the question of buying bolts and 
nuts in Canada is again receiving attention 
in Great Britain, and it is claimed that the 
combination which the nut and bolt manu- 
facturers of Scotland formed a few weeks 
ago has made it easier for Canada to do 
business in those lines. 

Judging from the correspondence referred 
to in the beginning of this article, letters 
have been passing between the Glasgow 
commission firm in question and some of 
the manufacturers in Canada. The latter, 
it appears, are of opinion that the commission 
firm should buy outright. But this the com- 
mission firm states it cannot do on account 
of the smallness of the margin of profit, and, 
furthermore, claims that, if the Canadian 
manufacturers are to do a successful trade 
with the shipbuilders in Scotland, it would 
be necessary for them to have stock in 
Glasgow, " as a better price can be got for 
prompt delivery, as high as 10 per cent, 
being charged for delivery from stock." 

United States manufacturers are making 
a bid for the trade, and the largest bolt and 
nut manufacturing firm in France has 
already not only appointed a Glasgow man 

- T 

io represent it in that city, but keeps stock 
there as well. The result is that this agent 
is doing a large business. 

" It will be the first in the field that will 
get the hold," writes the commission firm, 
"and it is almost certain the Americans 
will seize the opportunity, as they have been 
shipping rivets already to this district." 

The question of exporting rivets and bolts 



to the British market is one well worth the con- 
sideration of the Canadian manufacturers. 
That market, with its great shipbuilding 
interests, is naturally one well worth having 
a share of. Now, that there is a possibility 
of doing so, it seems to us it would be a 
mistake to allow the opportunity to slip by 
without making an effort to take advantage 
of it. 

The bolts made in Canada possess a high 
reputation for quality. We believe we are 
well within the mark in saying that none 
have a better reputation. On the score of 
quality, therefore, we have nothing to fear. 



A COUPON FAILURE. 

THERE have been several failures of 
concerns devoted to such schemes as 
coupons, trading stamps, etc. The 
latest failure in this line is that of The 
Toronto Cash Coupon Co., 35 Yonge street 
arcade, Toronto. 

The concern was started thiee years ago 
as The Buyers' and Mercantile Benefit 
Association, but the style was afterwards 
changed to that which it bears to-day, a 
new company with a capital of 540,000 
having been formed. 

The company sold to retail merchants 
books of stamps, one stamp to be issued for 
each 10c. worth of goods purchased. The 
book, when filled, would represent $100 
worth of goods purchased, and, on being 
presented to the office of the company, $3 
in cash was given the holder. The stamps 
cost the retailer y 2 c. each, or 5 per cent. 

Hardware and Metal always has been 
and is still opposed to such lines of business 
as that carried on by the firm in question. 
But business men who deem it wise to 
patronize them have had lessons enough to 
teach them that they should only employ 
the coupons or stamps of companies whose 
financial standing is sound, for the customer 
who fails to get her stamps or coupons 
redeemed will not throw all the blame upon 
the company that becomes insolvent or 
absconds, but upon the retail merchant who 
gives coupons. 

Just what the liabilities of the company 
are no one knows and probably never will 
know. The liabilities outside the share- 
holders are between 5400 and $500, but 



that does not include the sums owing to those 
who are holding coupons. The assets are 
about $100 and will be r.o more than enough 
to pay for the winding up of the estate. 

TIN IS ADVANCING. 

There has been a most phenomenal rise 
in pig tin since the first of the present 
month. 

When the month opened tin was quoted 
at ,£139 10s. London and ^133 Singapore. 
These prices were £16 higher than those of 
the same time last year, and consequently 
there was not the same reason to expect no 
advance this year as there was last July. 

To-day, however, ,£143 10s. is asked for 
it in London and ^138 at Singapore. In 
New York it has risen from 3 1 . 50 to 32. 75c. 
It is not surprising, then, considering this 
advance, that spot prices in Canada have 
been marked up. As a matter of fact, the 
Montreal dealers were slow, rather than 
prompt, in responding to outside conditions. 

Moreover, it seems likely that there will 
be further advances for the article can 
hardly be obtained on this market, so low 
are the stocks. 

The foreign markets in tin are still firm 
and advancing, while the statistical position 
of the metal continues to favor strength. 



A HIGH PRICE FOR LEAD. 

One of the features of the metal market 
at the moment is the high price of pig lead 
in Great Britain. 

Quotations there, according to cable ad- 
vices received in Toronto this week, are 
£\Z per ton for Spanish and ^18 5s. for 
English. 

It is a number of years since the price of 
pig lead touched these figures. 



PARTNERS WITH UNIQUE NAMES. 

Chu Tai, Chu Toy, Chu Kum, Fook and 
Shum Moon are the proprietors of a new 
mercantile concern in Victoria, B.C. In 
order that the firm will have some chance 
of being remembered, its style has been 
reduced to The Wing Chong Co. One 
would have to travel many days' jour- 
ney to find a list of parties whose names 
are more unique. We wonder whether 
their methods of doing business will be as 
unique as their names. For in-tance, will 
they eschew price cuttinj, ■ 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINNIPEG'S GREAT ANNUAL FAIR. 



THE Winnipeg Industrial Fair of 1900 
is now history, and a dating point for 
the future. The weather, the number 
of exhibits and the attendance all surpassed 
previous years. 

THE LEATHER. 

It was Queen's weather (as was but just 
and right, considering that we had the 
Queen's representative with us), but then, 
Manitoba Queen's weather is just a little bit 
better than you get anywhere else. Each 
morning Winnipeg got up to cloudless skies 
and bright sunshine, tempered with cool 
western breezes ; the evenings were clear, 
calm and starlit, and cool enough to render 
sleeping a luxury (that is, where you had 
anything to sleep on). Twice during the 
week a smart shower fell during the night, 
ust enough to lay the dust, but not enough 
to stir up Winnipeg's all too affectionate and 
clinging mud. 

THE VICE REGAL VISIT. 

Winnipeg was really en fete on Saturday, 
July 21, for on that date His Excellency 
the Earl of Minto and the Countess of Minto 
were to arrive. All day the trains coming 
into the city brought hundreds anxious to 
join in the loyal procession. The city was 
gay with bunting, and from almost every 
building on Main street, and on all public 
and many private buildings, floated the 
Unibn Jack. The decorations were really 
very beautiful, and many of them costly. 
Main street was not arched, as it is no trifle 
to span its ioo feet of driveway, and it was 
also thought unwise to in any way obstruct 
the view of the procession. 

The illuminations were nearly all in elec- 
tric lights — red, white and blue royal 
crowns, rose, shamrock, thistle and the 
maple leaf being the most popular forms. 
On the city hall was a crown with " V.R." 
and a maple leaf on each side, while below 
were the words " Welcome, Minto " written 
in fire. Perhaps the most effective thing 
was the monument in the City Hall Square. 
The tall column supporting the figure of the 
soldier in full uniform was literally a pillar 
of fire (most appropriate, when it is remem- 
bered by what a fiery road the brave young 
soldiers it commemorates went home). The 
train bearing Their Excellencies reached 
the city about 8.30, and by 9 o'clock the 
procession had reached the city hall. Let 
the reader remember that Main street is 132 
feet wide (100 feet of driveway and 16 foot 
sidewalk on each side) and ijs^ miles 
long between the C.P.R. depot and the 
Assiniboine river. It is well paved all the 
way, and the City Hall Square is just mid- 
way. The last of the procession was barely 
formed at the C.P.R. when the first part 



was passing the city hall. It was headed 
by the fire brigade, their apparatus beauti- 
fully decorated and all the big steamers and 
hook and ladder wagons burning limelights. 
It is impossible to describe that procession 
in detail. It would fill pages. The car- 
riage with Their Excellencies was drawn 
by four white horses, and the guard of 
honor was formed of Royal Canadian 
Dragoons, their brilliant scarlet tunics 
showing with fine effect, the Boys' Brigade 
and the 90th Regt., the latter being 
out in full force, their white helmets con- 
trasting vividly with their dark uniforms. 
The military were closely followed by the 
Scottish Clans in Highland costumes and 
with a contingent of no less than 10 pipers 
playing for dear life, half a mile of 
fraternal societies in full regalia, bands, 
bugles, fifes and drums and thousands upon 
thousands of well-dressed cheering, singing 
citizens, the light bright dresses of the 
women and children reflecting the light 
of the torches. As the viceregal party 
passed along, the electric light switches 
were turned on and a perfect blaze of colored 
light would stream across the street. The 
bands played " God Save the Queen " and 
the crowds cheered to the echo, they broke 
into the " The Maple Leaf Forever " and 
again and again the cheers broke forth, then 
' ' Soldiers of the Queen ' ' and it seemed as 
if the whole city had suddenly shouted 
together. Viewed from the top of a three- 
storey building it was a most gorgeous 
pageant, and once seen not likely to be for- 
gotten. Lord Minto was left in no doubt 
that he was welcome to the West (where he 
is looked upon as an old friend) and that 
the West is loyal straight away to the point 
" Where West is East Beside the Land- 
Locked blue," for there were scores of 
people all the way from British Columbia. 
But all this is not the Fair. With so 
auspicious a beginning it was not wonderful 
that the whole week was a success. 

EXHIBITS. 

It has been already said that the attend- 
ance was ahead of anything yet recorded, 
so it is not necessary to say anything more 
unless, perhaps, to quote the words of an 
American visitor who remarked : "Well, 
I'm blessed if I ever saw so well dressed a 
crowd. There must be 25,000 people on 
the grounds this minute, and I have yet to 
see one that is shabby, let alone in rags." 

The exhibits were best in those features 
that really represent the strength of the 
country. The stock was superb. The 
judges in all classes could hardly be too 
enthusiastic about it. And, not only were 
the exhibits fine in quality, but they were so 



numerous that at the last moment new 
stables had to be erected. The horses, 
cattle and pigs were all strongly represented, 
the sheep were the weakest class in the 
stock, and even they were a very good 
exhibit. The dairy exhibit was excellent in 
quality and very representative. The best 
cheese shown was made by a young woman 
student of the Manitoba Government Dairy 
School, Miss Lokier, of Genela, in the 2 
Dauphin District. The display of dairy 
machinery was tastefully arranged, and the 
largest yet made. Speaking of machinery, 
the local implement dealers came to an 
agreement some time ago that they would 
not exhibit on the Fair grounds, but in their 
own warehouses, and they claim that from 
the standpoint of business and orders, it 
has paid them better. From the stand- 
point of the appearance of the Fair, there is 
but one opinion, and than is the loss is very 
great. The machinery hall was always a 
great centre of attraction, for the dealers 
made large displays and their goods are 
effective. Good machinery in motion is 
always a pleasant sight. It is to be hoped 
by another year that some arrangement 
may be come to for their presence on the 
ground. 

Owing to the extremely dry weather of the 
month of June the horticultural exhibit fell 
far below its usual merit, though many of 
the specimens shown were very fine. 

The main building showed many fine and 
very tasteful exhibits; those of E. L. Drewry 
and The Scott Furniture Co. being pro- 
nounced the most attractive. The art 
critics are still disputing over the merits of 
the art gallery, so it is best let alone. There 
were a number of pictures that looked good 
and pleasant to the eye of the unlearned. 
The British Columbian building, built of 
British Columbian native woods, was a new 
and most attractive feature of the fair, and 
was thronged all day long and every day. 
The mineral exhibit was most instructive, as 
were also the grain and grass exhibits from 
Alberta, which were given place in this 
building. 

ATTRACTIONS. 

These grow yearly a more important 
feature of our Western fairs until the more 

WIRE NAILS^ 



TACKS 
WIRE 



Prompt Shipment! 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






sober-minded are inclined to think the thing 
is entirely overdone. However, this may 
be, there was at least one very regrettable 
feature of the attractions at Winnipeg, and 
that was the introduction of a "Midway." 
It is to be hoped it will not be repeated. 
Attractions which have as their lure women 
performers, and are of a character no decent 
women may see, should have no place on 
"we grounds of an Industrial Fair, which 
makes its proud boast of being educational 
as well as amusing. Education in vice can 
be obtained all too easily without the 
Exhibition directors making money out of 
placing it under the very eyes of hundreds, 
yes thousands, of youths fresh from country 
homes and eager for change and excitement. 

One of the sights of the Fair always is the 
" stock parade " of Citizens' Day and it is 
a sight worth going far to see. It is esti- 
mated that there were 12,000 people on the 
grand stand and in the paddock when it 
passed this year, and the crowd was quite 
as goodly a sight as all the glossy stallions, 
stately bulls and grunting, protesting pigs. 

American Day was, as ever, a great 
success. Year by year more of our cousins 
come to see us and fall in love with our 
country and come back to stay, or fall in 
love with our purebred stock and pay long 
prices for them. 

MERCHANTS IN TOWN. 

It is estimated that there never has been 
as many merchants from outside points in 
the city at any previous Fair, and though 
in the dry goods and hardware lines but a 
small amount of business was done, yet 
wholesale men express the opinion that in 
the end the meeting of heads of depart- 
ments and customers is a wise and profitable 
thing and is productive of much better 
mutual understanding. All travellers were 
in the city for the week and devoted them- 
selves to the comfort and pleasure of their 
customers. 

THE U.C TS MAKE MERRY. 

Some of the officials of the United Com- 
mercial Travelers of Minnesota and Dakota 
took the opportunity of the cheap rates for 
Fair week to visit the brethren here. Busi- 
ness being got through with by noon Satur- 
day an adjournment was made to Edison 
Hall, River Park, where, after a pleasant 
run on the electric cars, the guests and hosts 
n=at down to a banquet. The menu was 
choice, the service good, and it is safe to 
say that after the first course the repartee 
was as choice as the viands. Toasts and 
speeches followed the banquet, and from 
10 p.m. until midnight dancing was kept up 
merrily. The wire screening sides of the 
great hall admitted plenty of sweet fresh 
air, the floor was good, and the music better. 
Outside was a perfect Manitoba summer 
night and a grove of cool rustling poplar 




with seats here and there in shady corners, 
and the Knights of the Grip and their lady 
friends found this a delightful spot to cool 
off between dances. Winnipeg was reached 
shortly after midnight by a tired but jolly 
crowd, the American visitors insisting to the 
last breath that the Winnipeg U.C.T's were 
in very deed "Jolly Good Fellows." 



tion against foreign competition, united 
action will be inaugurated." 



TOOL TRUST IN GERMANY. 

United States Consul General Guenther 
writes from Frankfort, June 12, 1900: 
"The manufacturers of first-class tools and 
of iron and steel goods in Westphalia and 
Rhenish Province, have formed a trust. Its 
avowed purpose is to right foreign com- 
petition in tools, etc., and the menacing 
commercial invasion from the United States. 
At the same time, it is intended to combat 
the domestic production and sale of shoddy 
goods at ruinous prices. Every competent 
manufacturer who obligates himself to sell 
only first-class goods and mark them with 
the firm's name and price, can become a 
member of the union. The sale of poor 
and defective articles will result in expulsion. 
A committee will supervise the quality of 
the goods. The sale will be regulated by 
the union as much as possible, especially as 
to prices, terms, etc. For effective opposi- 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. R. C. Fisher, of Rice Lewis & Son, 
Limited, is taking a well-earned holiday. 

C. H. Rigby, chief purchasing agent for 
The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., Sydney, 
N.S., has resigned his position. 

A. MacGregor, head of the hardware firm 
of MacGregor & Son. Victoria, B.C., died 
suddenly yesterday from an attack of heart 
disease. 

Mr. S. W. Vogan, retail hardware mer- 
chant, Walkerton, Ont., was in Toronto 
early this week,- on his way to Europe. 
Hardware and Metal wishes him a 
pleasant journey. 



TO ABOLISH TRADING STAMPS. 

At a meeting of the Retail Merchants' 
Association of Toronto, held in the Temple 
building, on Tuesday night, it was unani- 
mously decided to discontinue giving trading 
stamps after August 1. Addresses, urging 
those present to adhere to the resolution, 
were delivered by W. B. Rogers, president 
of the association, and others. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

SPORTING GOODS. 

LEWIS BROS. & CO., Montreal, have 
just issued their annual sporting 
goods catalogue for the season 1900- 
1901. The cover is particularly attractive 
and appropriate. It is printed in black, 
yellow and white. In the foreground is the 
figure of a man in the act of taking aim, 
while in the background there are trees in 
black and the sky in yellow and white. 
The catalogue contains 58 pages, with some 
200 or more illustrations of guns, rifles, 
revolvers, cartridges, gun-cases, hunting 
clothing and sporting appurtenances of 
various descriptions. 

ENAMELED WARE. 

The National Enameling & Stamping Co., 
of the United States, with executive offices 
at New York, have issued a large catalogue 
of their wares, 35,000 copies of which have 
been distributed among those interested in 
their line of business. The catalogue is in 
ordinary book form, bound in heavy paper, 
and contains 650 pages, with 3,050 cuts of 
their enameled, japanned, granite steel 
wares, etc. A number of lithographed 
pages show their Patent Genuine Granite 
Steel Ware and Venetian and Brilliant 
Enameled Steel Ware in the natural colors. 
The book is being distributed throughout 
the entire world, and any dealer who has 
not received one, can do so by dropping a 
line to theii offices at 81 Fulton street, New 
York. 



"OXFORD FURNACES. 

The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, 
Toronto, have issued a catalogue, tastefully 
gotten up, for their new "Oxford" warm 
air and combination furnaces. It is illus- 
trated fully with halftones of their different 
styles of furnaces, each having a page of 
descriptive text. One page gives the 
dimensions, capacity and price list of their 
new " Oxford " 400 series, to which special 
attention is paid in the catalogue. Direc- 
tions in setting up the furnaces, locations, 
draughts, etc., are given a place in the 
catalogue, making it more than a mere 
advertisement. 

THE MARLIN TAKE DOWN REPEATER. 

A tasty booklet is being issued by The 
Marlin Fire Arms Co., New Haven, Con- 
necticut, called the " Marlin Trap-shooters' 
Score and Record Book." The covers are 
printed in colors, and are an attractive and 
artistic piece of work. Every alternate 
page is taken up with a printed score-card 
on which to record the number of targets, 
the number scored, entrance money and 
money received. Besides the space given 



to the score-card, the " Marlin Take Down 
Repeater" in three grades, "A" "C" 
and " D," is fully illustrated and described, 
and the price of each is quoted and com- 
pared with other makes. This shot gun is 
made with a single barrel only, and a page 
of the book is given to show the advantages 



of a single barrel over a double barrel. The 
booklet closes with a number of points of 
the superiority of the "Marlin," which will 
appeal strongly to all lovers of good guns. 
On the whole this booklet is a creditable 
production. Dealers should obtain a copy 
of it. 



IVER JOHNSON 



AND 



Guns 
Revolvers 
Are The ! 



The accidental discharge of an Iver Johnson Automatic Revolver is 
absolutely impossible. The only way to discharge the weapon is to pull 
the trigger. Handy for police, house, and pocket use. 

The Iver Johnson Single Guns are noted for their high-class construc- 
tion and low price. 

Leading jobbers handle the Iver Johnson Fire-Arms. 

SEND FOR NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



Branches— New York- 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 163 Washington St. 
Worcester— 304 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



AN ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY 

and economy of valuable space are two of the many 
advantages derived by using 

BOECKH'S ADJUSTABLE 
DISPLAY TABLES* 

Artistic in 
ip-rr 



Easily and 
instantly ad- 
justed to any 
angle. 

Useful for 
many purposes 
and always 
ready for use 




ffUt* 



and 



finish. 



Adopted by 
experienced 
window 
dressers every- 
where. 

Ornamental 
as well as 
useful. 



WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET. 




80 York 
Street, 

TORONTO 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

Marlin Safety Repeating Rifles. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE. 



— n .»ri...,^_T-, 



ft 



<5 
5 




Winchest 



ns. 






1 



Piepers Breech-Loading Guns 




10, 12 and 16 Gauge. 



Piepers Hammerless Guns. 

IMIOIDEIl 1900. 





© 

& 

Q. 

a 
Q. 

to 

to 

o 

n 

to 



LETTER ORDERS 
FILLED PROMPTLY. 



1 2 Gauge. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 

Graham Wire and Cat Nails are the Best. 



OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

VE. PARADIS bas been appointed 
curator of Mrs. F. Dumas, hard- 
• ware dealer, Quebec city. 

T. C. Forkes, general merchant, Rath- 
well, Man., has assigned to C. H. Newton. 

The creditors of George P. McNish, 
founder, etc., Lyn, Ont. , met August I. 

An assignment has been demanded of 
Major Frere & Co., roofers, etc., Montreal. 

Garner Bros., hardware merchants, etc., 
Niagara Falls, Ont., have assigned to Alex. 
Fraser. 

Francis Laroche, harnessmaker, Hull, 
Que., has compromised at 50c. on the 
dollar. 

J. J. Kelly, hardware merchant, Orange- 
ville, Ont., offers to compromise at 50c. on 
the dollar. 

Alf. Drolet, general merchant, St. 
Felecien, Que., has compromised at 35c. on 
the dollar. 

J. A. Costello, general merchant, etc., 
Brundenell, Ont., has assigned ; creditors 
meet August 4. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Poupore & Malone, contractors, Montreal, 
Que., have registered partnership. 

James & Huot, roofers, Montreal, have 
formed a partnership. 

S. & J. Carriere, general merchants, 
Coteau Station, Que., have compromised 
and dissolved. 

John Cox and Harry Clark, painters, 
North Sydney, N.S., registered copartner- 
ship July 25, as Cox & Clark. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

James Coakwell, harness dealer, Mark- 
ham, Ont., has sold out. 

J. H. Clark, general merchant, Tree- 
shank, Man., has sold out. 

Samuel J. Morris, general merchant, 
Crampton, Ont., has sold out. 

Andrew McAfee, general merchant, 
Waterford, N.B., has sold out to John 
Frier. 

H. Hyde, coal dealer, Truro, N.S., 
advertises his property for sale by tender, 
August 18. 

The stock of Elz. Grenier, general merch- 
ant, Murray Bay, Que., was sold at 69c. on 
the dollar. 

The stock of Carley & Studer, general 
merchants, Morden, Man., was sold by 
auction July 28. 

John Younie, manufacturer of window 
latches, etc., Montreal, Que., has sold his 
stock and machinery to the Montreal Hard- 
ware Manufacturing Co., Limited. 

CHANGES. 

F. M. McConnell, general merchant, 
Calton, Ont., has closed up. 

C. W. Raymond, general merchant and 



hotelkeeper, Mitchell's Bay, Ont., is closing 
up his store. 

George Doan, harness dealer, Glanworth, 
Ont., has closed up. 

Samuel Coburn, blacksmith, Westbourne, 
Man., is giving up business. 

Wm. McMaster, hardware merchant, 
Ridgetown, Ont., has commenced business. 

Mrs. J. Smith, harness dealer, Innisfail, 
N.W.T., has been succeeded by W. Hall. 

M. F. McDonald, hardware merchant, 
Okotoks, N.W.T., has commenced business. 

The Dominion Rock Drill and Foundry 
Co., Limited, Napanee, Ont., have obtained 
a charter. 

Fortune & Sons, general merchants, 
Bridgeport, N.S., have opened a branch at 
Sydney, N.S. 

The Hamilton Gasoline Engine and Auto- 
mobile Co., Limited, Hamilton, Ont., have 
obtained a charter. 

Wm. Calbeck has bought out W. T. 
Hodgson's share in Hodgson & Bowness, 
grocers and hardware merchants, Bedeque, 
P.E.I. ; style changed to Bowness & Co. 

STARTING BUSINESS. 

Isaac Kersey has commenced business as 
general merchant at Edy's Mills, Ont. 

D. Locerte has commenced business as 
general merchant in Prince Albert, N. W.T. 

FIRES. 

T. J. Hunt, blacksmith, Thornhill, Man., 
has been burned out. 

The storehouse of The D. Moore Co., 
Limited, stoves and tinware, Hamilton, Ont. , 
was damaged by fire and water ; insured. 



THE FIRST NAIL MACHINE. 

W. Perry writes to The Montreal Herald 
as follows under date of July 27 : "Look- 
ing over The Herald of July 21, I read an 
interesting letter on the invention of the first 
wire nail machine. Please allow me space 
to say that I built the first pin machinery in 
Canada for Pullan & Co. (for manufacturing 
the ordinary brass pin in daily use). Leav- 
ing their employ in 1868, I went to Cote St. 
Paul to build the machinery for the manu- 
facturing of shovels, and for Messrs. Froth- 
ingham & Workman, and, while there, in 
connection with a Frenchman from France, 
a wire nail machine was made for Patrick 
Dunn, Esq., manufacturer of nails. This 
machine turned out nails in every respect 
equal to many made to-day ; this was over 
30 years ago, and I think, Mr. Editor, Mr. 
P. Dunn should be credited with making 
the first nail machine in Canada for making 
wire nails. He paid the bills. The pin 
machinery alluded to was on a fair basis to 
build the wire nail machinery." 



THE COST OF STOVES. 

INQUIRY among stove manufacturers 
develops as strong reasons as ever 
for maintaining prices. A very promi- 
nent Western stove manufacturer says that 
the dealers who are waiting for reductions 
in prices do not understand how largely 
labor enters into the cost of stoves. Since 
1898 the average wages paid to working- B 
employed in the stove foundries and mount- 
ing shops have advanced considerably, and 
there is no prospect at this time of getting 
any reduction. Manufacturers have a yearly 
agreement with the moulders' union which 
does not expire until spring, and they 
would have to be confronted by a very 
serious state of affairs to attempt to make 
reductions in the wages of their other em- 
ployes just as activity is expected to develop 
in fall trade. With no relief from high labor 
cost, the only direction in which a reduction 
might be expected is in the cost of materials. 
But here it is found that prices have not yet 
shown a sufficient decline to establish much 
of a difference as compared with contracts 
for materials from which stoves are now 
being manufactured. We are advised by 
manufacturers whose reputation for vera- 
city and integrity has never been questioned, 
that thus far, notwithstanding published re- 
ductions in prices of pig iron, they have 
been unable to get a concession of more 
than 50c. a ton on the grades which they 
are obliged to use to get satisfactory cast- 
ings. As previously stated in these columns, 
very little iron was contracted for at the 
high prices prevailing last fall, most stove 
manufacturers having had the forethought 
or good judgment to buy enough when 
prices were lower to carry them well into 
this year. As they did not advance stove 
prices to correspond with the extreme ad- 
vance in pig iron, it cannot reasonably be 
expected that they will make a reduction in 
stove prices simply because the advance in 
pig iron could not be maintained. On the 
other hand, if the demand for pig iron had 
developed sufficiently to keep its price at 
the very high level reached, it is absolutely 
certain that stove manufacturers would have 
been compelled to make a greater advance 
in their prices than any thus far charged. 
Their old pig iron contracts would have ex- 
pired and they would no longer have been 
in a position to give their customers somOk 
of the advantages of the possession of 
cheaper material. — The Metal Worker, 
July 28. 



The Nova Scotia Steel Co., Limited, will 
build 1 2 miles of railway in Cape Breton in 
connection with their coal areas there. 



About 400 delegates will attend the con- 
vention of the Canadian Electrical Associa- 
tion in Kingston, on August 29, 30 and 31. 
Arrangements are being made to entertain 
them with searchlight excursions, banquets 
and band concerts. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., 



M.inut.i< lui 
Imp' • I 

n ten, 

Nippers and Plyers, Wrenches, Glass Cutters, Nail Pullers, Razors, Butcher Knives, etc. 



296 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 



OUR 1900 CATALOGUE SENT FREE UPON APPLICATION 




The British Columbia Copper Co., 
Limited, are building a 300 ton smelter at 
greenwood, B.C. 

A farmers' cooperative binder-twine com- 
pany is being organized in Walkerton.Ont., 
with a capital of #120,000. 

The Victoria Foundry Co., Ottawa, who 
were burned out in the late fire, expect to 
be running in two months' time. 

The Nova Scotia Steel Co. have postponed 
the new company's flotation for a time, 
owing to the tightness of the English money 
markets. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 
Montreal. 



. . FULL STOCK . ■ 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 




Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

ihe CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Portland 
Cements 



BEST BRANDS. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Drain Pipes, 
Calcined Plaster, 

and a full stock of 

Builders' and Contractors' Supplies. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

W. McNally & Co. 

MONTREAL. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 



Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Back. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 




For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 



\ 

Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
A. R. WOODY ATT & CO., Guelpb, Ontario. 

Hardwood CHARCOAL m b^ or sacks. 

WUUU ALUUnUL equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 



Manufactured only by.. 



THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., limited 



Factories -( •%...——•*- 

( Ueseronto. 



Gooderham Building, TORONTO 



HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 




WORCESTER, MASS., U. S. A. 



Makers of 



H k ;; h '^7e REVOLVERS 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE. 

For sale by Sporting Goods and 
Hardware Stores almost everywhere. 



NOTICE TO IRON BRIDGE BUILDERS. 

C EALED TENDERS addressed (o the undersigned and 
^ endorsed " Tender for iron work of bridges over the 
slide channels, Ottawa," will be received at this office 
until Thursday, August 16 next, for the reconstruction of 
the iron work of the bridges across the Chaudi*re slide 
channels of the Ottawa River, in the City of Ottawa, 
which was destroyed by fire in April last, according to 
plans and a specification which can he seen at the office of 
the Superintending Engineer of the Ottawa River Works, 
over the Post Office in the city of Ottawa, and at the 
Department of Public Works, Ottawa, after Wednesday, 
August 1 next. 

Tenders will not he considered unless made in the 
manner called for by the specification and signed by the 
actual signature of the tenderer. 

An accepted chartered bank chequ", payable to the 
order of the Minister of Public Works, and equal to 10 per 
cent, of the bulk amount of the lender, must accompany 
each tender. The cheque will be forfeited if the paity 
decline to contract or fail to complete the work contracted 
for. It will be returned in case of non-acceptance of 
tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order, 

JOSEPH R. ROY. 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa, July 30, 1900. 

N.B. — Newspapers inserting this advertisement without 
authority from the Department, will not be paid for it. (32) 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO, 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 






HRS&C 

UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carri.s a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office: 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL. 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, August 3, 1900. 
HARDWARE. 

TTADE is quiet, but there is no lament- 
ing, for there are unmistakable signs 
which go to show that business is in 
a fairly healthy condition. Payments are 
good, and mail orders continue to come in 
for seasonable goods. A good fall trade is 
generally looked forward to. There have 
been some discouraging reports of crops, 
yet the harvest, on the whole, will be fair, 
and we reasonably look for continued pros- 
perity. The outlook in Manitoba is not so 
encouraging, and some orders, placed early 
in the season, have been cancelled, yet it is 
hoped that the Province and Territories will 
not be so badly off when the inventory is 
taken. The farmers out there have more 
sources from which to draw a livelihood 
than they once had, for they do not now 
grow grain only. The only change in quo- 
tations we have to note is that the price list 
of bolts has been entirely recast. 

Barbed Wire — In this line the trade are 
only getting ready for the fall demand. 



The orders coming in now are few. We 
quote the base at $3.30 f o.b. Montreal in 
less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — There is little doing 
in galvanized wire. We quote as follows 
Nos. 6, 7, and 8 guage, $3.95; No. 9, $3.20 
No. 10, $4 10; No. 11, $4. 15; No. 12, $3.35 

No. 13, $3.45; N °- H. #4-5°; No - I 5- #5 
and No. 16, $5.25, for small quantities. 

Smooth Wire — All varieties are slow at 
$3 per 100 lb. base. 

Fine Steel Wire — Fine wire shares in 
the slow tendency of other grades of wire. 
The discount is 15 per cent, off list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — This is pretty 
well out of season. Discounts are 55 and 
iyi per cent, on brass, and 50 and zyi per 
cent, on copper. 

Fence Staples— Trade is dull at $3 45 
per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Both jobbers and retailers 
are sorting up stocks and the fact leads to 
a fair movement. We quote $3.10 for 
small lots and $3 for carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and St. John, 
N.B. 



Cut Nails — A lot of small orders are 
arriving, giving a tone of activity to the 
market. We quote J2.60 for small an-d 
$2.50 for carlots. Flour barrel nails, 25' 
per cent, discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per 
cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — A fair business is noted. 
The discount is 50 per cent, on Standard and 
50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Quiet, but inquiry for for- 
ward account is beginning to make itself 
felt. We quote : Iron shoes, light and 
medium pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.65 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, #3.90 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, $3.90 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4. 15 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.85 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4 10 ; feather-weight, all sizes, $5.10; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, $6.20 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. extra. 

Screws — Trade is fairly active. Dis- 
counts are as follows : Flat head bright, 8 
per cent, off list ; round head bright, 75 
per cent. ; flat head brass, 75 percent.; 
round head brass, 67 '4 per cent. ; flat head 




A NEW FURNACE 

(ROUGH WOOD 

For any kind of Fuel ™U 00D 

(soft coal 

Made in three sizes, with capacities ranging from 10,000 
to 50,000 cubic feel. The most modern and powerful 
heater of its kind made in the Dominion. 

They have larger heating surfaces than any other, 
and have . . . 

Heavy sectional firepot, 

Triangular grates, 

Double fire door, size II xl5 in. 

Direct or indirect draft. 

Safety gas damper, 

Steel plate dome and radiator. 

They are easily set up, and cased. 

A HIGH-GLASS FURNACE AT A LOW PRICE 

Descriptive matter will be mailed to Agents 
in a few days. 

THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, 

WINNIPEG, or VANCOUVER. 



• 



■i 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 

New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

V> W. Dewees Wood Com pan* s 

Planished I: on 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. II. Thompson & Company 

26 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO, 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 



Incorporated 
1851. 



WESTERN 

** ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital, subscribed $2,000,000.00 
Capital - - - 1,000,000.00 
Assets, over - - 2,340,000.00 
Annual Income - 2,290,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-President. 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



bronze, 67 "^ percent.; round head bronze, 
62 "^ per cent. 

Bolts — The quantities moving this week 
are much larger than for some time past. 
The price list is recast. Discounts are : 
5-16 and under, 60 per cent. ; y% and larger, 
55 per cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 60 
percent.; coach screws, 70 per cent.; sleigh 
shoe bolts, 75 per cent.; square nuts, 4c. 
per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4 "4c. per lb. 
off list ; bolt ends, 65 per cent. ; blank bolts, 
60 per cent.; plough bolts, 55 per cent.; 
Norway bolts, square, 65 per cent.; tire 
bolts, 60 percent.; stove bolts, 60 and 10 
per cent. 

Rivets — Business in these is well main- 
tained for the season. We quote discounts : 
Best iron rivets, section, cairiage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
50 per cent, off; swedes iron burrs, 45 per 
cent, off; copper rivets, 35 per cent.; 
coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. 
carton boxes, 50 per cent. off. 

Cordage — Rope is moving with some 
degree of activity. The base prices are 
unchanged at 14c. for manila, and o^c. 
for sisal. 

Spades and Shovels — Trade is moder- 
ate. The discounts are 40 and 5 per cent. 

Firebricks — There is a good demand for 
firebricks considering the season of the year. 
We quote $17 to 524 per 1,000 as to brand. 

Tacks — The inquiry for tacks continues. 
Merely as base prices we quote : Carpet 
tacks in dozens and bulk, blued, 80 and 
5 per cent, discount ; tinned, 80 and 10 
per cent.; cut tacks, blued, in dozens, 75 
and 15 per cent, discount. 

Cement — Carlots have been been mov- 
ing this week, probably in anticipation of a 
firmer market. As yet, there is no change. 
We quote as follows : German, $2.40 to 
$2.60; English, $2.30 to $2.40 ; Belgian, 
$1.80 to $2. 10. 

METALS 

Trade is dull with the continued advance 
of tin and lead as the chief features. 

Pig Iron — Some transactions in Summer- 
lee at $24.50 on wharf, have taken place 
this week. Iron is very scarce in Montreal. 

Bar Iron — The demand continues strong 
at $2.15 to #2.20 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

Black Sheets — There is a fair demand 
for these on forward account. We quote the 
base on 8 to 16 gauge at $2.95. 

Galvanized Iron — There is little 
activity shown. We quote : No. 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.75 to $5.00, and Comet, No. 28, 
$4.40 to S4.65. 

Ingot Copper — The market is quiet and 
steady. We still quote 17 yic 

Ingot Tin — The tendency of the market 
is still upward and no collapse in the high 
values is anticipated. The price here is 37c. 
There is very little spot tin in sight. 



TINPLATES 

"LYDBROOK," "TRYM," 
"GRAFTON," "ALLAWAYS," 
"CANADA CROWN," ETC. 

CANADA PLATES 

" DOMINION CROWN " All Polished. 
"ALLAWAYS" best Half Bright. 
"PONTYPOOL" Half Bright. 
"DOMINION CROWN" Galvanized. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 



MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Offer from Store, 
Montreal, Toronto and Hamilton: 




Special Values in 

Galvanized Iron 

QUEENS HEAD, COMET 
AND APOLLO BRANDS. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



An Opposition 
Traveller 

said to one of our representatives a 
few days ago that "You people make 
me tired the way you blow about 
that Elastilite Varnish." 

Poor Fellow ! No wonder he was tired ! Elas- 
tilite has taken his customers and he has to work 
hard to get orders. 

Elastilite is a Varnish for either inside or 
outside that you can sell over and over again to 
your customers. Once used they always ask for it 
and tell their friends how nice it looks and how 
well it wears. 



— Manufactured only by- 



l e Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



WE HAVE A LARGE AND FULLY ASSORTED 
STOCK OF 

Harvest Tools 



Forks, 
Rakes, 
Hoes, 
Scythes, 



Snaths, 
Spades, 
Shovels, 
Etc., 



and will guarantee prompt shipment from 
warehouse for immediate orders. 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



We quote : 7c. for 
composition waste, 



Lead — Outside quotations are firm. We 
quote the base at $4.65. Stocks are strongly 
held here. 

Lead Pipe — Quiet, 
ordinary and "J%c. for 
with 15 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — There is a good demand for 
iron pipe with prices steady. Makers remain 
apart. We quote : %, $2.95 per 100 ft.; 
H. #2.95; y z . #3.10; %, $3.45; i, #5.20; 
ij^, $6.75; 1%, $8.10, and 2-in., $11.00. 

Tinplates — Tinplates are firm with de- 
mand slow. Prices are $4.50 for coke, and 
$4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — Canada plates are low 
in the English market, but, as stocks here 
were bought at high figures and as goods 
cannot be brought here in less than two 
months, it is not likely that any further drop 
willoccur. We quote: 52' s, $3; 60' s, $3.05; 
75' s, $3.10 ; full polished, $3.50, and gal- 
vanized, $4.60. 

Terne Plate — Price remains at $8.50, 

Swedish Iron — We quote $4. 25. 

Coil Chain — Trade is quiet. We quote 
as follows: No. 6, nj^c, No. 5, 10c. ; No. 
4, 9j£c; No. 3, 9c; X"' ncn > 7'A^. per lb.; 
5-16, $4-85; H> 84-8o; 7-16, ^4.50; y*, 
$4.25; 9-16, 84-15: ft. *3'-86; %, $3-75; 
7 /i, $3-7°. an< i 1 inch, 83.70 per 100 lb. 

Sheet Zinc — Demand is fair at 6% to 
6^c. 

Antimony — Unchanged at ioj^c. 
PAINTS AND OI1.8. 

Advices from the Old Country appear to 
show that the pig lead market is steadily 



advancing. A cable of Wednesday reports 
pig lead at ^18. This, of necessity, gives 
a stimulus to all lead products, such as flake 
and ground letharge, orange mineral, red 
lead and dry white lead. At the moment 
there is, however, only a fair movement in 
ground white lead in Canada, and prices, 
while still firm, are unchanged. It remains 
to be seen whether the steady advance now 
taking place in pig lead, will not affect the 
price of ground white lead when a brisk 
demand springs up. The dull season will 
then be over, and Montreal grinders expect 
a brisk run of trade. Dry colors are 
normally the same except English ver- 
milion, which shows a strong upward 
tendency. Gold leaf is scarce, and firm at 
current quotations. A fair movement is 
reported in varnishes. Turpentine is 2c. 
lower. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 86.75 ; No. 1, $6.37^ ; No. 2, 
86; No. 3, 85-62^, and No. 4, 85-25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal, prompt cash. 

Dry White Lead — 85-75 i n casks; kegs, 
$6. 

Red Lead — Casks, 85- 10; in kegs, 

$5-35 t0 ^5-5°- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c. ; No. 
1, 6j£c.;inoil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7>£c. 

Putty -We quote : Bulk, 8 T -95 ; blad- 
ders, in bbls., 8 2 - 10 ; bladders, in cases, 
82.25; in tins, 82.35 to 82.60. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 84c. ; boiled, 
87c, five to nine-barrels, ic. less, ten 
and twenty-barrel lots open, net cash, plus 
2C. for 4 months. Delivered anywhere in 



Ontario between Montreal and Oshawa at 
2c. per gallon advance and freight allowed. 

Turpentine— Single barrels, 67c. ; two to 
four barrels, 66c; five barrels and over, 
open terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — 81.20 to 8 T -4o per 
gallon. 

Castor Oil — 8^ to 9#c in whole- 
sale lots, and %c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47^ to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c. 

Paris Green — Demand fair ; 1 -lb. 
packets, I9^c, and drums, \2>%c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
82.75 to 84- 5°. as t0 brand; coal tar, 
83.25 to 83-75 ; cotton waste, 4>£ to 5>£ c - 
for colored, and 6 to T%c. for white 
oakum, 5^ to 6^c, and cotton oakum, 
10 to lie. 

GLASS. 

Foreign quotations on glass continue 
firm, but prices here are unchanged. Large 
quantities are arriving. We quote : First 
break, 82 ; second, $2. 10 for 50 feet ; first 
break, 100 feet, 83-8o; second, 84 ; third ,r 
84.50 ; fourth, 84-75 I fifth > #5- 2 5 I sixth, 
85.75, and seventh, 86.25. 

PETROLEUM. 

The petroleum market is quiet and 
featureless. We quote as follows : ' ' Silver 
Star," jobbers, i6^c. ; retail, I7j£c. ; 
«■ Imperial Acme," 17^ and i8^c; " S. 
C. Acme," 19 and 20c; "Astral," 20 and 

2ic. 

HIDES. 

No change is reported in hides. There 

is no accumulation of stock. Green hides 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






are quiet. We quote : Beef hides, Sc. for No. 
I ; 7c lor No. 2, and 6c. for No. 3. Calf- 
skins, 9c. for No. 1, and 7c. for No. 2 ; 
lambskins, 30 to 35c. 



MARKET NOTES. 

All lead products are firm. 

Nearly all travelers are off the road at 
present. 

•f* Ingot tin continues to advance at outside 
markets. 

Turpentine has declined 2c. ; bolts and 
coil chain quotations are also lower. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, August 3, 1900. 

HARDWARE. 

ANOTHER week has passed without 
any particularly new features devel- 
oping in the wholesale hardware 
trade. With so many travelers taking their 
holidays and the midsummer season now on, 
the volume of business is necessarily not 
large. At the same time, however, it is 
generally reported to be fairly satisfactory 
for this time of the year. Some renewals 
are being asked for, but payments are, as a 
whole, fair. The week has been unmarked 
by any quotable change in prices. If any- 
thing, a little more business is being done 
in wire ana cut nails. Fence wire of all 
kinds is still inactive, but without change in 
prices. Very little is doing in horseshoes. 
Screws are in active demand. Bolts and 
nuts are moving fairly well, and the same 
may be said of rivets and burrs. Trade is 
fairly good in enameled ware. In both 
rope and binder twine, there are quite a few 
orders, but they are individually small. 
Sporting goods are going out more freely, 
and cutlery is in fair demand. The demand 
has fallen off for harvest tools. 

Barb Wire — There have been a few 
little lots going out during the past week, 
and a few more inquiries are reported, but 
business, on the whole, is decidedly light. 
We quote f.o.b. Cleveland $2.95 in carlots, 
and $3.05 in less than carlots ; f.o.b. 
Toronto, $3.25 in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — There is scarcely 
anything doing in this line and prices are 
without change. We quote as follows from 
Toronto : No. 5, $4.52^; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 
gauge, $3.85; No. 9, 53.10; No. 10, $4.; No. 
*ii, $4.05; No. 12, $3.25; No. 13, $3.35 ; 
No. 14, $4.40; No. 15, $5.10; No. 16, 
$5.15. Thef o.b. price Cleveland for Nos. 
6 to 9 base is $2. 80 in less than carloads, 
and $2. 70 for carloads. Terms are 60 days 
or 2 per cent. 10 days. 

Smooth Steel Wire — We hear of no 
business being done in either oiled or an- 
nealed or hay-baling wire. The base price 
is unchanged at S3 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Trade in wire nails has 




been a little more active during the past 
week. There has been a fair sorting-up 
demand for this time of the year. We 
quote carlots at $3, and less quantities at 
S3- 10 per keg. 

Cut Nails — There is also a little more 
doing in cut nails, but the volume of busi- 
ness is still light. The base price is $2.60 
per keg, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Belleville. 

Horseshoes — A moderate business only 
is being done in horseshoes. We quote, 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, $3.75 ; 
snow shoes, $4. ; light steel shoes, S3. 95 ; 
featherweight (all sizes), $5.20 ; iron 
shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), #4; snow- 
shoes, $4.25; light steel shoes, $4.20; 
featherweight (all sizes), $5- 20. 

Horse Nails — Business in this line con- 
tinues to be small. Discount, 50 per cent, 
on standard oval head, and 50 and 10 per 
cent, on Acadia. 



Screws — Trade in this line is even better 
than it was a week ago, the demand being 
exceptionally good. We quote as fol- 
lows : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off 
the list ; round head bright, 75 per cent.; 
flat head brass, 75 per cent. : round head 
brass, 67 # per cent.; fiat head bronze, 
67% per cent.; roundhead bronze, 62^ 
per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — There is a fair demand 
for stove and tire bolts, with prices un- 
changed at last week's reduction. We 
quote : Norway bolts, full, square, 65 
per cent. ; common carriage bolts, full 
square, 65 percent.; ditto, 5-15 and under, 
60 per cent.; ditto, y% and larger, 55 per 
cent. ; machine bolts, all sizes, 60 
per cent. ; coach screws, 70 per cent. ; 
sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; blank bolts, 
60 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
nuts, square, 4c. off ; nuts, hexagon, 4#c. 
off; tire bolts, 60 per cent. ; stove bolts, 
60 and 10 per cent.; plough bolts, 55 per 
cent. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Rivets and Burrs — There is a fair trade 
being done, but this line is without any 
special feature. Prices are as before. We 
quote: Carriage section, wagon box, rivets, 
etc. 50 per cent. ; black M rivets, 50 per 
cent. ; iron burrs, 45 per cent.; copper 
rivets, 35 per cent. ; bifurcated, with box, 
5-lb. carton boxes, 30c. per lb. 

Enameled Ware — A nice business is 
being done in this line, particularly in pre- 
serving kettles. 

Rope — Orders for this line are small. 
Although a fair number of them have 
been received. Prices are unchanged 
Wequote: Pure manila, 13^ to 14c; "A" 
quality manila, 11 }4 to 12c. ; special 
manila, 10^ to 11c. ; sisal, gyi to 10c. 

Binder Twine — Quite a few orders are 
coming to hand, but they are only of a 
hand-to-mouth character. Quotations are 
largely nominal, and a good deal of cutting 
is going on among the retail trade. We 
quote : Pure manila, I2^c; mixed, 9^c; 
sisal, 9c. 

Harvest Tools — Business in this line 
has fallen off during the week and the 
movement is now small. Discount 50, 10 
and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — There are some 
going out all the time, but the general 
volume of business is small. Discount 40 
and 5 per cent. 

Sporting Goods — This is one of the 
chief lines in which increased movement is 
to be noted. During the past week quite a 
few guns and rifles have gone out, and 
ammunition is being shipped in fair 
quantities. As far as ammunition is con- 
cerned the chief movement is in loaded 
shells, but an increased movement in gun- 
powder is anticipated in a week or two. 

Cutlery — A fsirly steady trade is being 
done in cutlery, but the business is naturally 
of a sorting-up character. 

METALS. 

Pig Tin — Galvanized iron and solder are 
the most active lines. In other kinds of 
metals trade rules quiet. The market is 
without special feature. 

Pig Iron — Prices have not yet ceased to 
to decline in the United States and quota- 
tions are purely nominal, the furnacemen 
seemingly being willing to accept almost 
any figure. There are very few transactions, 
as foundrymen are only buying when they 
can get a snap. Practically the market is 
dead. 

Bar Iron — The market is still weak, and 
not much business is being done. We still 
quote $2 in carlots, $2. 10 in smaller quan- 
tities. 

Pig Tin — A fairly good trade is being 
done and prices are steady. We quote 36 
to 37c, the inside quotation being to close 
buyers. 



Tinplates — Trade is quiet and without 
special feature. 

Tinned Sheets — There has been a little 
movement in tinned sheets, but it has 
principally been for shipment West. 

Black Sheets — There is the usual steady 
demand for black sheets at $3.60 base. 

Galvanized Sheets — This is the most 
active line in the wholesale metal trade. A 
fairly good business has been done during 
the past week. Wequote : 28 gauge, Eng- 
lish, at $5 in case lots, and American at 
#4.60 in half- ton and ton -lots. Smaller 
quantities 15c. dearer. 

Canada Plates — There is very little 
business being done in this line, and the 
feature is the arrival of import orders. We 
quote: All dull, $3.35; half-polished, $3.50, 
and all bright, #4. 

Iron Pipe — As noted elsewhere, an 
effort is being made among the wholesale 
houses to put a stop to the present cutting 
of prices and to make quotations uniform. 
Two meetings have been held this week, 
but with what result we cannot ascertain in 
time for this issue. Discounts are : Black, 
pipe, X to Y% inch, 40 per cent. ; Y z inch, 60 
per cent. ; ^ to 2 inch, 66 % per cent. ; larger 
sizes, $0 and 5 per cent. Galvanized pipe: 
y z inch, 40 per cent. ; % to 2 inch, 50 per 
cent. 

Lead Pipe — A fairly steady trade is being 
done in lead pipe. We quote 7c. per lb., 
with discount 15 per cent., f.o.b. Toronto. 

Lead — There is a small steady demand 
at 5 to 5^ c. per lb. Pig lead is unusually 
high in Great Britain, Spanish being quoted 
at £\Z per ton and English at ^18 5s. per 
ton. 

Solder — A fairly good trade is being 
done in solder, and some of the orders are 
for good-sized lots. We quote : Half-and- 
half, 21 ^ to 22^c; refined, 21 to2i^c, 
and wiping, 20 to 21c. 

Copper — Prices have advanced in both 
Great Britain and in the United States. 
Locally, however, quotations are without 
change, and wholesale houses are still 
quoting 19^ to 20c. for ingot, and 23 to 
2 3}4c. for sheet copper. 

Zinc Spelter — There is not much doing 
and quotations are unchanged at 7 to 7% c. 

Zinc Sheets — There is not a great deal 
doing, and we quote 7 to 7>£c. per lb. for 
casks and part casks, respectively. 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

The only change in prices this week is a 
decline of 2c. per gallon in turpentine in 
sympathy with the Southern markets. Since 
then, however, there has been a reaction in 
the primary markets, and present figures 
are likely to continue firm. At the new 
price there is a little better movement than 
last week. Linseed oil is still firm, though 
there has also been a little more active 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF Vr» 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

DERBY S1SAP. 

With Plated Rust Proof 
and Guarded Spring. 

" THE LATEST AND BEST." 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S QLIPPER5, 

S^neS - -^3Pl*i«wt Variety, 

-—" ' /l Toilet, Hand, Electric Powerl 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB CATALOGUE TO 

iBtrlcaa Sh«ar»r mtg. Co., Nashua, H.H., CSi 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will clooe a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



BURMAN & SONS', LIMITED 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 
The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia'sStables and Field Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 

BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

On sale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



market this week. Trade, however, is still 
pretty slow. Paris green has fallen off con- 
siderably, and, although there is still a fair 
demand, this may be expected to close for 
the season in a week or so. We quote as 
follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.S7)4; No. I, $6.50; No. 2, $6.12% 
Ffl, 3. JfS-75 ; No. 4, $S ; dry white lead is 
casks, $5.75. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $5.50 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 55.75; 
No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $5 to $5.25; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., $5.25 to $5.50. 

Litharge and Orange Mineral — 
Litharge, 6 to 6}£c. ; orange mineral, 8 
to 8 J^c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 
Paris White — goc. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb.; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22#c. ; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.15 ; bulk, in bbls., 
$1.95 ; bulk, in less quantities, $2.10. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per barrel. 

Paris Green — Petroleum, bbls., 18c. ; 
arsenic, kegs, i8#c. ; drums, 50 and 100 
lb. i8^c. ; drums, 25 lb., I9#c. ; tins, 1 
lb., 2oJ<c.; tins, % lb. 22#"c; packages, 1 
lb., I9^c. ; packages, % lb., 2i^c. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2. 50 per cwt. 
in barrels, and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less quan- 
tity ; lump, ioc. in small lots, and 8c. in 
barrels. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gallon ; No 1 quality, $1.00 per gallon. 

Seal Oil — 54c. per gallon, and yellow 
seal at 45c. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 
to ioj^c. per lb. and ioyi to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
86c; boiled, 89c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 85c; 
boiled, 88c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, Guelph and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 69c ; two 
to four barrels, 68c, delivered to outside 
points. Toronto, Hamilton, London, Sarnia, 
Walkerville, Chatham, Dresden, Wallace- 
burg and Amherstburg, 2c less. For less 
Kiantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

There is no change as yet in prices. 
Glass has been coming forward in large 
quantities, but it is goods manufactured be 
fore the strike, and to what extent it may hurt 
the factories is difficult to say. We quote 
first break locally : Star, in 50-foot boxes, 



84,000 Dally Production. 
5 Factories. S Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sals all 
over tha World 




20 Oovornmants. 85",, R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70 of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., cte. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 

Works: Kavcnhea.il, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street. London, E.G.— 128 Hope Street, Glasgow — 
12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Paradise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address ; "Glass, St. Helens." Telephone No. 
68 St Helens. 



$2.10, and ioo-foot boxes, $4.00; double 
diamond under 26 united inches, $6.00, 
Toronto. Hamilton and London ; terms 
4 months or 3 per cent., 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL.. 

The improved condition of trade con- 
tinues. A little business is doing, but, 
on the whole, it is not very satisfactory. 
We quote jobbers' prices as follows : 
Agricultural scrap, 50c. per cwt.; ma- 
chinery cast, 50c. per cwt. ; stove cast 
scrap, 40c; No. 1 wrought scrap, 50c. per 
100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 12c. per 
lb. ; bottoms, \oyio.. ; heavy copper, 12c. ; 
light scrap brass, 7c. ; heavy yellow scrap 
brass, ioc. ; heavy red scrap brass, io^c. ; 
scrap lead, 2^c. ; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 
5c. ; good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c. ; 
clean dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 
PETROLEUM. 

There is no change in prices to be 
noted. A fair trade is being done. We 
quote as follows : Pratt's Astral, 18c. 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; American 
water white, 18c. in barrels ; Photogene, 
17 y£c; Sarnia water white, 17c. in barrels; 
Sarnia prime white, 16c. in barrels. 
COAL. 

Prices for August shipments are the same 
as for July. The market is quiet. Our quo- 
tations, for August shipments, for anthracite 
on cars at Buffalo and bridges are as fol- 
lows : Nut, egg and stove, $4.50 per gross 
ton, or $4.01 per net ton ; grate, $4.25 
per gross ton, or $3.79 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Pig lead is unusually high in England. 
Turpentine has declined 2c. per gallon. 



A large pulp mill has just been started in 
Vancouver, B.C. 

The Lord Roberts and Admiral Seymour 
schools, to be built in Vancouver, B.C., 
are each to cost $10,000, and to be two - 
stoiey wooden buildings with stone founda- 
tion, and basement for drilling. The heat- 
ing contracts will be awarded to-day 
(August 3), when it is expected that the hot 
air system will be adopted. 



SOUTHERN PIG IRON SHIPMENTS. 

A review of the industrial operations in 
the Southern iron field and the Birmingham 
district for the first six months of 1900, says 
a Birmingham, Ala., despatch, shows con- 
tinued development along these lines. The 
total shipment of pig iron from Alabama 
and Tennessee for the period named was 
689,508 tons, a decrease trom tne same 
period of last year of 68,288 tons. But last 
year there were 235,000 tons of accumu- 
lated stock of pig iron to draw from for 
shipments and these stocks were ex- 
hausted during the year, leaving prac- 
tically none on hand at the beginning 
of this year. Therefore the amount of 
iron shipped from Alabama and Tennessee 
this year was manufactured this year, and it 
is thus apparent that 140,000 more tons 
were made the first six months of 1900 than 
during the corresponding period of 1899. 
Pig iron shipments from the Birmingham 
district alone for the first six months of the 
present year were 433,492 tons, a decrease 
of 17,527 tons. Accumulated stocks in 
this district last year were nearly 150,000 
tons. 



TRADE CHAT. 

THE proprietors of the New Brunswick 
Foundry business, Fredericton, N.B., 
are arranging for the formation of a 
joint stock company. 

The machinists of St. Thomas, Ont., held 
their picnic at Port Stanley, Ont., on July 
28. 

The Dominion Steel Co., Sydney, N.S., 
are putting up 32 boilers of 250 horse-power 
each. 

The employes in Victoria, B.C., stores 
are agitating for a half holiday on Saturday- 
afternoons. 

The Dominion Coal Co., Sydney, N.S., 
are enlarging and renovating their place of 
business at Ridgeport, N.S. 

The smelter scheme to which the citizens 
of Kingston, Ont., recently gave a bonus of 
money and land, has matured, and the 
company will seek for incorporation imme- 
diately. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 30, 1900. 

This market reports a fair business for the 

week and absolutely no change in prices. 

We quote ; 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 75 

Plain twist 3 75 

Staples 4 25 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

n 4 00 

12 4 05 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 
J 5 4 45 

Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 75 

16 and 20 3 80 

1° 3 85 

o 3 go 

6 4 °5 

4 4 15 

3 4 4° 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 330 

20 to 40 3 35 

10 to 16 3 40 

8 345 

6 3 60 

4 3 7° 

3 • 3 95 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 4 65 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 5 15 

No. 2 and larger 4 9° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 5 20 

No. 2 and larger 4 95 

Bar iron, $2.90 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5 basis. 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 4 25 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28 gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian , lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, I C charcoal, 20 x 28, box 1075 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 14 75 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 5° 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 4 5° 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch ... .50 and 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 45 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger 11 25 

H 11 75 

K and 5-16 12 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 15 00 

H 15 5° 

# and 5-16 1600 

Solder 23 14 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 15 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " 70 p.c. 

Flat ' ' brass 70 p c. 

Round " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 42^ p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 55 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 37^ p.c. 

Copper, No. 8, lb 33 %c. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Linseed oil, raw, per gal 92 

1 ' boiled " 95 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 40 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 10 p.c. 

C.F. military Net. 



Loaded shells, Robin Hood, M #20 00 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 2300 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per ioo lb 7 25 

Chilled 750 

Powder, F.F., keg 4.7c 

F.F.G.:... 8 5*00 

Robin Hood 10 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

Turpentine, by barrel 80c. 

Less than barrel 85c. 



IRON ORE FROM ALGOMA. 

REPORTS from Sault Ste. Marie are to 
the effect that the Algoma Central 
Railway, one of the undertakings ol 
Francis J. Clergue, is ready to begin haul- 
ing ore to Michipicoten, just above the 
Sault, for shipment to Ohio ports. A cor- 
respondent of The Marine Review, Cleve- 
land, says : 

"The is no let-up in Clergue' s enter 
prises. He has just begun work on a 
second water-power canal of 40,000 horse 
power on the Canadian side. I visited the 
mines near Michipicoten and saw the first 
ore shipped down to the new Michipicoten 
dock. The dock is unique and perhaps a 
good innovation, though it remains to be 
proved. It is only 42 feet high to the track 
deck, and the gravity pockets are small and 
will be used only for trimming. The main 
storage of the dock, which can be made 
almost unlimited, is back and below, the 
ore being supposed to run by belt conveyors 
out to the front of the dock and then to a 
point above the ship's hatches on a short 
cantilever truss. They hope to erect back 
of the dock face a storage in bins of about 
300,000 tons, which will be enormous com- 
pared to other docks of the same length of 
frontage. They will have room to load one 
500 footer or two of the ships they have 
bought in England, and expect to load 
rapidly. They are equipping their 12 -mile 
road with 85-lb. steel rails, and 50-ton steel 
cars and no ton locomotives." 

In the construction of the Michipicoten 
docks (ore and merchandise) about 1,500,- 
000 feet of pine and spruce timber have 
been used. The commercial dock is 300 
feet long, 40 feet wide, and on either side 
vessels with a 20 foot draught can tie up 
and be unloaded into the cars, which run 
from a switch out upon the pier. Mitchell 
& Powell have the contract to remove, 
crush and load iron ore from the mine on 
to the cars. They will use the Gates ore 
crusher No. 8, the' largest size made. It 
crushes the ore into pieces from 3 to 4 
inches in size, and will have a capacity of 
200 tons an hour. The crusher will be 
driven by an engine of 250 horse-power, 
deriving its force from two large boilers. 
The railroad track runs right alongside the 
crusher, so that the crushed ore can be 
loaded in cars ready to be shipped to the 
docks. About half a mile from the harbor 
are the Algoma Central switch yards, 
which, when finished, will hold 1,000 cars, 
repair shops, roundhouse, coal sheds, etc. 



ii* Special 
Announcement 

To The Trade. 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 
COMPANY 
Limited 

Respectfully announce to their 
clients and the trade generally, 
that, owing to the usual 

AKMER 

holidays, the travellers will not 
be making their calls with their 
accustomed regularity. Mean- 
time, every department is in 
FULL SWING and orders 

By Letter 
By Wire 
By 'Phone 

will continue to receive prompt 
attention. 

Visitors will be cordially wel- 
come at our 

Head Office and Works, 
572 William St., MONTREAL,'* 
or at 
go Bay Street, TORONTO. 



THE 




cot 

LIMITED. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A PICNIC OF PAINT MEN. 

BY an unanimous vote, the employes of 
the Canada Paint Company again 
decided to visit Otterburn Park for 
their annual picnic. The journey was made 
on Saturday, by the Grand Trunk Railway, 
by special train from Bonaventure station. 
The jolly party were accompanied by the 
r :j*<. Cunegonde brass band. The weather 
was simply glorious, and the recreation 
grounds at St. Hilaire never looked better. 
The sun shone, the skies were blue and 
unclouded, the air felt warm, yet exhilara- 
ting, and all nature seemed to be full of life 
and beauty. 

A tent bearing the inviting sign of the 
Dew Drop Inn was erected near the danc 
ing pavilion, from which refreshments were 
served ad lib. throughout the day ; and an 
atmosphere of perpetual mirth and good 
nature seemed to pervade everywhere. The 
Rosa D'Erina quadiille band furnished the 
music for tripping the light fantastic ; and 
a number of games were well contested. 
On the way home, an impromptu concert 
was held on the train, and the habitants in 
the fields paused in their onslaught upon 
the festive potato bug and listened with 
astonishment and delight to the hilarity 
emanating from the cars. One of the staff 
sang the new music hall ditty, entitled "My 
Lady Friend." The chorus is very edify- 
ing and went with a swing to waltz time : 

My lady friend, my lady friend ! 
Don't you twig, dear boys 
By the sound of the kisses 
It isn't his missus, 
But only his lady friend ! 

The French-Canadian branch repeated 

the refrain somewhat after this fashion . 

Ma chere mam'zelle, 

Ma chere mam'zelle, 

Comme ca, comme ca, dear boys, 

By zee zound of zee kiss 

It isn't hees miss, 

But only his laidee fren' ! 

The employes desire to thank all those 
who contributed so liberally to the annual 
outing which was such a great success. 

The following were the committee, judges, 
etc : 

Committee — F. Thibeault, chairman ; W. 
Lamont, M. Doyle, O. Bezeau ; A. E. 
Coleman, secretary ; N. Macdonald, treas- 
urer. 

Starter— C. Little. 
» Judges— Mr. C. E. Felch, Mr. \V. Thibe- 
ault, Mr. F. Kennedy, Mr. J. T. Venables. 



MARITIME HARDWAREMEN. 

The second annual meeting of the Mari- 
time Hardware Association was held in 
Digby, N.S., on July 26 and 27. On 
Thursday evening a banquet was held at 
the Manhattan. Many of the delegates 
were accompanied by their wives, and their 
presence at the banquet added greatly to the 



occasion. The session was largely attended, 
in this respect being far ahead of that of 
last year, which also met in Digby. On 
Friday morning the whole party enjoyed a 
sail to different points of interest on the 
Basin, at the invitation of W. H. Thome, 
of St. John. The officers elected for the 
ensuing year are : 

President— A. M. Bell, Halifax. 

Vice-President— Thomas McAvity, St. John. 

Executive— S. Hayward, P. McMichael, Win. 
Kerr, of St. John, and Edward G. Stairs, W. G. 
Robertson, and W. E. Brine, of Halifax. 

The appointment of a secretary -treasurer 
is left with the executive, but it is under- 
stood that the office will fall to a Halifax 
man, as the president this year resides in 
that city. 



A NEW HARDWARE STORE. 

Millar & Co., Portage la Prairie, Man., 
have built a fine new solid brick hardware 
store, 105 x 60 ft. One thing which is 
noticeable about it is the way the counters 
are divided off into squares. They are 
about three feet each and every other one 
has heavy plate glass which answers the 
same as a showcase for showing goods. 
The fine oil- finished hardwood squares give 
nice room for setting heavy goods on. In 
the rear, Millar & Co. have a tinshop, 25 x 
25 ft., and a store-room, 20 x 20 ft. 
Besides this, there is a basement the whole 
size of the building. The ceiling of the 
store is covered with metallic sheeting. 
The building being situated on a corner, 
affords two entrances. The main one of 
these is set in the corner. 



EN ROUTE FOR THE COAST. 

Mr. Frank Scott, Montreal, has been in 
Toronto during the past week in the interest 
of the different firms he represents. The 
firms he represents are such well known 
ones as Hawkesworth, Eyre & Co., Limited, 
Sheffield, Eng. , manufacturers of every 
description of silver-plated goods ; James 
Deakin & Sons, Limited, Sheffield, Eng., 
silver, nickle silver, silver and plated 
cutlery, Britannia metal and oak goods ; 
Maleham & Yeomans, Sheffield, Eng., table 
cutlery, razors, palette and putty knives, 
cases of carvers, cabinets, etc. ; Singleton 
& Priestman, Sheffield, Eng., pen and 
pocket cutlery, sportsmens' knives, etc. and 
Theodore Fischer, Solingen, Germany. 

Mr. Scott is on his way to the Pacific 
Coast and is calling at the different trade 
centres en route. He is carrying a large 
range of samples. 



The employes of John Bertram & Sons, 
tool manufacturers, Dundas, Ont , held their 
thirty-first annual picnic at the Brant House 
on July 28. 



AIR SHIP IN SWITZERLAND. 

Till: United States Consul at St. Gall, 
Switzerland, under date of July 5, 
writes as follows : 

" At the invitation of Count Zeppelin, I 
was present at the trial ascent of hi- . ir ship 
on the afternoon of July 2 at Man/.ell, on 
Lake Constance. 

" At 7 o'clock the great ship, 124 meters 
(407 feet) long and 12 meters (39 feet) in 
diameter, containing 17 separate balloon 
compartments filled with hydrogen gas, was 
drawn out of the balloon house securely 
moored to the float. In 20 minutes all was 
ready for the ascent, and the ship left its 
moorings, with Count Zeppelin in charge of 
one of the gondolas and Mr. Kugene Wolf, 
the famous explorer, in charge of the other, 
while Baron Bassus accompanied the party 
as meteorologist. At the moment of the 
ascent the wind was blowing at the rate of 
about 26 feet per second, giving the opera- 
tors a good opportunity of testing the ability 
of the air wheels to propel the great ship 
against the wind. 

" The cigar-shaped structure ascended 
slowly and gracefully to about 30 feet above 
the raft. The balances were adjusted so as 
to give the ship an ascending direction. 
The propellers were set in motion, and the 
air ship, which has cost considerably over 
$200,000, started easily on its interesting 
trial trip. At first, the ship moved east 
against the wind for about two miles, grace- 
fully turned at an elevation of about 400 
feet, and, making a rapid sail to the west- 
ward for about five miles, reached an 
altitude of 1,300 feet. It was then turned 
and headed once more east, and after 
traveling about a mile against the wind, 
blowing at the rate of 26 feet per second, 
suddenly stopped ; floating slowly back- 
wards, three miles to the west, it sank into 
the lake, the gondolas resting safely upon 
the water. 

"The time of the trip was about 50 
minutes ; distance traveled, about 10 miles ; 
fastest time made, 5 miles in 17^ minutes ; 
highest revolution of the propellers, 600 per 
minute ; highest possible revolution, 1,200. 
The cause of the sudden stoppage in the 
flight of the ship was occasioned by a slight 
mishap to the steering apparatus, but the 
colossus floated gently with the wind until it 
settled upon the surface of the lake without 
taking any water. The raft was then 
brought up, and the ship was easily placed 
upon it and brought back to the balloon- 
house. The weight is 200 centners (22,000 
lb.). The cost of filling the balloon with 
hydrogen gas was $2,000." 



A large deposit of iron ore has been un- 
earthed near North Frontenac, Ont. 



•24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



PLUMBERS AND SUPPLY MEN. 

IT will be remembered that the last act of While the size of hot air pipe that will be required 

the convention of the National Associa- -° heat a , , room * 111 lar £ ely de P end u P° n * he exist " 

v ** ing conditions, that vary in different buildings— to 

tion of Master Plumbers was to appoint wit . proportion of exposed wall and glass surface, 

-> -,-™™;tt<m ««■ ( u„-. a/t~_. __i i u length of pipe and construction of building — there 

a COmm.ttee of three Montreal plumbers : mu f t , nevertheless, be some relation to the cubical 

Messrs. J. W. Harris, J. W. Hughes, and contents of same, and, therefore, as the simplest 

.,,, , T , . . . ,, and most readily comprehended rule of apporlion- 

Ald. Joseph Lamarche, whose duty it would ing the size of hot air pipes we offer the following 

be to confer with the wholesale supply men ,ab ' e - whl r ch is based on the building being de- 

rr ' tached, of average construction and exposure, 
Or manufacturers in regard to misunder- average length of pipes and the outside tempera- 
Standings, etc. This committee is trying to ^t l ero - In ca f ° f exl ™ rd ' nar >' conditions^ 
b '*"6 such as poor construction of building, location of 

Come to an understanding with these supply building, exceptional exposure of wall surface, 

_,__ •_ _ j_ . t j j- unusual glass exposure, loose windows and doors, 

men in order to prevent misunderstandings. and i ong hot air pipes aIlowances must be madet 

It is understood that they will try to and the ratio of size of hot air pipes to cubical con- 

.... , tents must be increased proportionately over that 

induce the manufacturers to meet together stated in this table. 

and form an association, with which the One square inch of capacity of hot air pipe will 

National Association of Master Plumbers heat cubic feet of space as follows : 

can deal. Each Corporation will then be dwellings. 

responsible for the actions of its members. ... . , Cub - ll - 

Living-rooms, one side exposed 23 

Moreover, arrangements can be made with Living-rooms, two sides exposed 20 

the associations across the line. *Sleeping-rooms, one side exposed. 35 

''Sleeping-rooms, two sides exposed 25 

As yet, arrangements have not taken a Halls 3S 

• u 1 c c .l !_■!•» -Bathrooms, size 8 x 12 x q feet or over 

tangible form on account of the inability to (smaller sizeS| 8 . inch pip ^ l8 

get the men together, but it is likely that this 

„ '.„ ... PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

talk will culminate in some arrangement Cub. ft. 

shortly Stores (where furnace is connected to one 

pipe directly over same) 50 

The arrangement will be that the plumbers Churches (where furnace is connected to one 

will buy only from the members of the pipe directly over same) 9 o 

»/r r , 1 a • .• j it. 1 * If located on the second storey, the vertical 

Manufacturers Association, and the supply partition pipes or stacks can be abo y u ' t 25 per cent 

men will sell only to the members of the !e . ss in capacity than the round collar connecting 

- T .. , . . . , -, _. , pipe to said partition pipe, on account of increased 

National Association of Master Plumbers. velocity of hot air in the vertical pipe. 

It is probable, too, that a code of prices example 

will be established. This ought to be of T 1 c ^ v . L i 

b In explanation of the above table, we 

immense value to both parties. A man's ... , „ , _ 

v give the following example, to wit : To 

ability ought not to be exercised in "dicker- , .. _ ,• . r ^ a -.x. » -j 

' heat a living-room, first floor, with two side- 

ing." Both parties in the bargain in this ,, c , , 

v b wall surfaces exposed, size 15 x 15 x 10 ft. 

case, have too much opportunity to make ••• ,• , • r „ 

vv J ceiling, equaling 2,250 cubic ft., at a ratio 

other and better use of it. Both parties , ., , .. , . 

r of 1 to 20, the size of the hot air pipe 

ought to know an invariable price which - . t . - • ... . , . . 

° r required to heat this room is arrived at by 

heaven and earth cannot move. This is ,- ... , ,. „ 

dividing 2,250 by 20, equaling 112^, 

the best and most satisfactory way of doing .. . . 4 . . , , , 

13 & which is the equivalent of a 12-in. pipe of 

business, you know then that there is a ... 

, 113 cubic in. 
reasonable profit in business, and you know, 

too, that no one is underbuying or under- 

selling you. THE U SE OF THE HOUSE TRAP. 

With the plumbers it ought to introduce T HAVE been very much surprised at the 

more uniformity in their charges. Contract lack of practical knowledge displayed 

figures ought not to differ in amount as * by the writers who favor the abolition of 

much as they sometimes do now. the house trap in plumbing systems, says a 

writer in Metal Worker. I have been for 

TO DETERMINE SIZE OF HOT 20 years a journeyman and foreman 

AIR PIPES. plumber, and my statements are in reference 

A subject that comes up to the furnace- to what I have seen and done. These are 

man with renewed interest every fall is the not theories, but actual facts. A man came 

proper size of hot air pipes to use in furnace to our store and complained of a strong 

heating. The following method of deter- odor of sewer gas in his house, and I was 

mining the size of such pipes is reprinted sent to make a test. I found defective joints 

from the catalogue of a firm in the United and no house trap. When the pipes were 

States : taken out I found that the action of the 



sewer gas had eaten the lead calking so that 
there were openings for the gas to percolate 
through and distribute itself over the hot£*. 
Now, this is only one of a number of such 
cases which came up last winter. Since 
completing the repairs and putting in a 
house trap with fresh air inlet, there has 
been no odor. 

I have worked under Colonel Waring 
and some other sanitary experts, and their 
opinions usually favored the use of the 
house trap and fresh air inlet. There are a 
number of ways to run a fresh air inlet, and 
the best way can only be determined by 
experience. I will say, furthur, that a 
larger seal should be made in the traps. 
The tendency of the manufacturers is to 
make the trap too shallow, thus cutting off 
the seal and making great care necessary in 
setting the trap to have it level, as a slight 
incline destroys the seal. 

My objections to the "omission of the 
house trap are due to several reasons. One 
is that a general discharge of sewer gas 
from outlets on roofs would contaminate the 
air to a dangerous extent when the atmos- 
phere is still or muggy and heavy, and thus 
disseminate those germs from which an 
epidemic might result. Another reason is 
that even though these germs discharged 
over our homes might be immediately 
wafted safely away by the winds or be de- 
stroyed by sunshine and air, there is a 
great danger of their entering the building 
from defects in the drainage system, such 
as has been mentioned. There are two 
classes of bacteria in the sewers, one harm- 
less and the other dangerous, and while the 
house trap cannot prevent them entering a 
building, the seal of it can obstruct them, 
and, when frequently renewed, it is an 
excellent barrier. 

The use of the fresh air inlet in connec- 
tion with the trap permits a steady current 
of air to flow through the house drainage 
system to carry off with it anything objec- 
tionable, and there is less danger from such 
a current of air than from one from the 
sewer should any of it enter the dwellin. 
through defects in the piping. Anyone 
who doubts the difference in the quality of 
the air from systems with and without a 
house trap can readily be convinced by 
going to the roof and using his nose at the 
top of the different pipes. 



The Rhodes, Curry Co., Limited, Amherst, 
N.S., are building a new wheel shop, and 
will soon have a capacity of six cars a day. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






PLUMBING 



Recommendation 



A eatiMi'-'l customPT I lie kind lliat 

will oome. again is obtained bj good woik 

ami ^<M)il k K 

The J. M. T. Cushion-Disc Faucet 
id one. Made In inedlfTerenl vai le le i 
I'm- Bath, Basin, >-ink ami Laundry. Il:i- a 
double washer, prevents hammering, unique 
In design. An advertisement tor the plumber 
wiiu ust's them. The trade supplied by 



r : 



The Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 



TORONTO 



Limited. 




HOT WATER 
INSTANTLY, 

NIGHT OR DAY. 

Boiling Water 
in a Minute. 
Hot Bath When Wanted 



EWART'S 

"LIGHTNING" 

GEYSER 

FOR GAS OR OIL. 

346 EUSTON ROAD, 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Illustrated Price List Free. 



Refrigerators 

BUY 

EUREKA 

it is the beat. 
WHY? 

ist. Because it is 
built on scientific princi- 
ples, having insulated 
walls it is easy on Ice. 

2nd. Because the sys- 
tem of circulation of air 
is perfect. 

3rd. Because it is well 
budt. 

Further information 
can be obtained in cata- 
logue which is free. 

Address, 

Eureka 
Refrigerator Co. 

This cut represents No. 13. 54 Noble St., Toronto 




- 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PflisKUPPIHE BUREAU. 

5 5 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE 

Telephone Main 125S. 
28 Front St. West, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers ot 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 




KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220'/, Board of Trad*. MONTREAL. 

SPECIALTIES C Brand Home Nail* - Canada 
HoiM Nail Co. 

BOLT8-Tlre and Stove Bivett ol all kl 

craft Screw ( 'o. 

BRAS8 COOD8 — Ounn Castor Co., Limited, Bir- 
mingham, Eng. 



Berlin Felt Boot Co. 



BERLIN, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Guaranteed 
BEST and 
CHEAPEST 
in the 
market. 



HAIR FELT 



Hade in 
1/2 INCH 
3/4 " 



For Water and Steam Pipe Covering. 

We keep a Large Stock to make Prompt Shipments. 



AS GOOD AS THE 
BEST, AND BETTER 
THAN MOST. 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, CAN. 




Dominion Pattern 

Cow Tie ? Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are wel 
shown in the illustrati -n. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, with prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animals foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section , 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern. 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the States,' ' 
is now rapidly coming in favor in Canada 
short link, handsome appearance and smooth sur- 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck — make 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties. 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, 
ONT. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

THE Methodists of Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont., are about to build a Sunday- 
school of cut stone to cost about 
$9,000. It is to becompleted by New Year's 
Day, 1901. 

A large hotel will be built at Port Stanley, 
Ont. 

A new academy is to be erected at 
Sydney, N.S. 

A new church is being built at Moose 
Creek, Ont. 

An Anglican church is being built at 
Verdun, Que. 

J. J. Noonan is building a dwelling in 
Chatham, Ont. 

John Cassidy is building a residence in 
Chatham, Ont. 

A new Methodist parsonage is to be built 
at Thedford, Ont. 

A new Congregational church is being 
built in Nelson. B.C. 

C. S. Higgins will build a dwelling and 
shop at Dundalk, Ont. 

T. Norris is building a residence on Maple 
avenue, Quebec city. 

Andrew Kerr will build a dwelling in 
Ottawa to cost $ 1,000. 

Denis Norman will build a residence in 
Ottawa to cost $1,850. 

G. Schmidt is about to build a large resi- 
dence in Victoria, B.C. 

A new Roman Catholic church is being 
erected in Eelbrook, N.S. 

Oliver & Sons are erecting a large build- 
ing in Hintonburgh, Ont. 

J. M. Bond & Co., Guelph, Ont,, will 
shortly extend their premises. 

The Dominion Coal Company will build 
a hospital at Glace Bay, N.S. 

St. John's congregation, Chatham, Ont., 
will erect a new church there. 

John Dawson is about to build two resi 
dences in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

A new public school building will be 
erected in Ottawa to cost $25,000. 

A new wing is soon to be built to the 
General Hospital, Kingston, Ont. 

A building for a post office and Customs 
house will be built in Deseronto, Ont. 

An opera house is to be built in Napanee, 
Ont., to be completed by October next. 

A large addition to the Montmorency 
Cotton Mills, Quebec city, is being built. 

A large building is to be erected in Vic- 
toria, B.C., immediately, to cost $25,000. 

The contracts have been awarded for the 
Raymond Co.'s new factory at Guelph, Ont. 

The Frost & Wood Co., Smith's Falls, 
Ont., are about to rebuild their shops and 
put up a new blacksmith shop. 

The Ottawa Foundry Co., Ottawa, are 
about to erect a building in that city to 
cost $6,000. 

A new armoury will be built at St. Thomas 



for the 25th Regiment. It will be of brick, 
two storeys high, with a basement ; to cost 
$12,000. 

The Eddy Co., Limited, Ottawa, will 
build a three- storey brick paper and finish- 
ing mill in that city. It is to be completed 
by September 15. 

Building permits have been issued this 
week in Toronto as follows : Working 
Boys' Home, three-storey brick building on 
Gould street, near Church street, $15,000 ; 
E. Newson, pair of semi-detached brick 
dwellings on Dufferin street, north of 
Dundas street, $5,000 ; W. Kinnear, pair 
of two-storey semi-detached brick and stone 
dwellings on Crawford street, south of 
Arthur street, $5,500 ; James Phillips, four 
two storey detached brick and stone dwell- 
ings on Markham street, near Robinson 
street, $8,500; Robert Hunter and W. 
Mansell, two two-storey detached brick 
dwellings on Dovercourt road, near College 
street, $5,000 ; Victor Harshaw, two storey 
brick and stone residence on Jameson 
avenue, near Queen street, $2,700, and 
Wm. Scott, pair of two storey detached 
brick dwellings on Cowan avenue, near 
Huxley street, $4,000. 



MONTREAL PLUMBING CONTRACTS 

New tenders have been called for the 
C.P. R. Windsor street station improvements 
this week, on account of some changes 
decided upon. 

W. J. McGuire & Co., Notre Dame street, 
have contracts for the heating of the Sun 
Life Insurance Co.'s building ; for the 
plumbing, heating and lighting of a house 
for Mr. F. L. Hutchison, and for the plumb- 
ing, heating and lighting of a house and 
stable for Mr. F. W. Molson, Drummond 
street. 

Aid. Jos. Lamarche has contracts for the 
roofing, heating and plumbing of Mr. F. 
Mercier's house on Mount Pleasant avenue 
(Mr. Chas. Chausse, architect) ; for the 
roofing, plumbing and heating of the Ste. 
Mary's school on Craig street (Mr. Theo. 
Daoust, architect); for the roofing, heating 
and plumbing of Ste. Eusebe school on 
Chausse street (Perrault & Lesage, archi- 
tects) ; for the roofing of Mr. J. P. Cuddy's 
stores and dwellings on St. Lawrence street 
(Mr. W. E. Doran, architect); for the roof- 
ing of Mr. Jas. P. Wilson's new residence 
on Sherbrooke street ; for the roofing of a 
residence on Pine avenue for Dean Waldon 
(Mr. Robt. Findlay, architect), and for the 
roofing, plumbing and steam-heating of the 
church at St. Anne des Plaines, Que. 



A PLUMBER'S WINDOW DISPLAY. 

C. W. Meikel, a plumber of Indianapolis, 
has managed to keep at least half a dozen 
people at all times in front of his store, 
watching the live ducks in the window, 
according to a correspondent of Printers' 
Ink. Ducks in a plumber's window ! To 
the curious it is hard to understand what is 
being advertised. The first idea is carri^ 
out by calling the attention of passers-by ; 
after that, it is no trick for them to see what 
Meikel is there for. A week later his win- 
dow presents a scene, ostensibly the result of 
imperfect plumbing ; a crowd stops to find 
out the cause of the fall of water down the 
show window, apparently from the floor 
over the store. Mr. Meikel is making an 
impression. As the little streams of water 
trickle down the glass, it does not shut out 
altogether the display of nickel -plated towel 
racks, Venetian lamps, and the other goods 
in his line. A "stir" in another window 
has been caused by four electric fans, 
placed in the midst of about 5 lb. of feathers 
and down. It did not take long for the 
fans to distribute the down over the wheels 
suspended from the ceiling, clinging there 
a second, and whirled again through space 
until it seemed a furious snowstorm con- 
fined in about eight square feet. This was 
too good a chance to lose not to play on the 
word " down," and the price of the wheels 
was used in connection with it. Animation 
will always excite the animated. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

The stock of the estate of J. W. Chambers, 
heating, etc., London, Ont., has heensold. 



A RAPID CITY BUSINESS BLOCK. 

A decided improvement is being made 
this summer in Rapid City, Man. Mr. 
Edward Stout is building a handsome solid 
brick block, comprising three stores 34 x 66 
ft. each. Mr. Stout is calling it after his 
English home, Urpeth. 

Lepage Bros. , general merchants, are to 
have the corner opening on Fourth and 
Third avenues. Mr. T. Houlding, hardware 
merchant, is to have the west corner. The 
centre store has not yet been taken. The 
second flat will be divided into offices, and 
the third one will be used as a public hall. 
This will be the finest block in Rapid City, 
and one that any town might well be 
proud of. 

AN IMPROVED FRONT. 

E. W. Gillett's building on Front streets- 
Toronto, has been recently much improved 
in appearance. Three large signs stretching 
the full length of the building have been 
placed above each storey, and in each 
window of the second storey a figure of a 
negro boy holding a painted sign of Gillett's 
lye, is placed in a sitting position on a box 
of the lye. These make a showy advertise- 
ment. The whole front has been repainted, 
and the building now presents an attractive 
and business-like appearance. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American manufacturers ot 
'inplaten, Tinned Shcow>, Terne Platea, Canada Plates Gal- 
anized Should, Imitation ItusHmSheets. Rlaik Sheets— Iron 



vanized Sheets, _— 

and Steel — Hoops and Bands, Proved Coil Chain, Brass and 

Oopper Sboeu, Norway Iron and Steel. Wheelbarrows.etc. 



rJJ 







XVanToylSFairbank 



Petrolla, Ont. 

Headquarters for . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 

Pumps, Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools, Cables, etc. 






COOPER PATENT ELBOWS 

Bright and Common. 




E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

Sole Manufacturers 
HAMILTON. ONT. 






"JARDINE" 

TIRE UPSETTERS 
WILL UPSET TIRES 

Some machines sold as Upsetters will not. 
Perhaps you make as much money on the 
sale of a useless Upsetter as on a good 
one, but your customer does not. He 
don't want a machine because it is called 
an Upsetter he wants a machine to upset 
tires. Sell him one of ours. 

IT PAYS TO SELL THE BEST TOOLS 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




Pail E 



ars 



A . 



Saucepan Handles. \ 

I 

BER6ER BROS. CO., - Philadelphia. ! 



Neatest designs, greatest strength and finest finish of any made. Large stock of all 
constantly on hand, and all orders filled promptly. By the gross, package, or in bu k, as 
desired. SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Babbitt Metals . . . 
Tinners' and Plumbers' Solder 
Ingot Brass, etc. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

Pig Tin, Pig Lead 
Ingot Copper . . 
Antimony, etc. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 



Factories: MONTREAL, 
and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. HSS52S5M2: 




STEVENS EINE TOOLS 



We make a perfect line 



ot- 



CALIPERS and DIVIDERS 

Also such tools as Surface Gauges, Tool Makers' 
Clamps, Center Punches, etc. 

Write for our New Catalogue containing a description of our Tools. It is also 
a valuable hand-book of information for mechanics and people interested in 
such lines. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 

P.O. Box 216. Chicopee Falls, Mass., US. A. 
Carried by our representatives at Toronto and Montreal. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, -white and colored, Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twine*. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PRAISE IN BUSINESS. 

A BUSINESS man in dealing with his 
associates should always be as 
ready to praise as he is to con- 
demn, but he should do both sparingly and 
with great judgment, says The Chameleon. 
He should condemn only when it is absolu- 
tely necessary and give praise only when 
specially merited. 

Flattery seldom shows itself among 
fellow-workmen. It is an error on another 
side of business life, and there's not the least 
danger that it will ever enter into the rela- 
tions between men in the same office and 
shop. That is right and fortunate, but it is 
not right to go to the other extreme and cut 
out all praise and well-deserved compli- 
ments. 

Fair praise is encouragement. It helps 
bolster a fellow up and give him self- 
confidence. It doesn't " spoil " a work- 
man or make him vain. It is a stimulant 
and will produce greater effort and better 
work. 

There are plenty of discouragements in 
business life to overbalance whatever praise 
may come our way. Our own view of our 
work is apt to be a discouraging estimate, 
and we need to be braced up from the out- 
side once in a while. Promotion and 
increased salary don't come often enough 
to let them suffice as the bracer. We need 
the occasional approval and appreciation of 
those we work with. 

Each one of us, knowing he feels the 
need of something of that sort himself, 
should then be always willing to applaud 
the other fellow when he deserves it. We 
should be ready with commendation and at 
least give credit where it is due. Above all 
we should not be censorious. 

There are men who never praise or show 
appreciation. It seems to hurt them every 
time they are forced into it, and they do it 
with such bad grace that its effect is lost. 
They never offer encouragement to their 
fellow-workers, but always disparage and 
condemn. They aim to pick out the flaws 
and to enlarge upon them to the exclusion 
of everything that's good and commend- 
able. 

These self-appointed critics seem to avoid 
studiously all possibility of being pleased. 
They shut their eyes to everything but 
faults, and if real faults be lacking their 
warped judgment supplies them. They are 
constantly looking for a chance to hiss, and, 
to prevent the likelihood of applauding, 
keep their hands tied behind them. 

They revel in fault-finding and when 
they're at it their cynical smile of content 
is more exasperating than their carping 
criticisms. They are disagreeable people 
to work with. They are never popular 
with their associates. They effect one as a 



succession of dark, cloudy days would, and 
it's a relief to get away from them and into 
the wholesome atmosphere of more fair- 
minded men. 

Modern business sympathy and mutual 
helpfulness have no room for these censor- 
ious people, and if we are young and in the 
formative period of our business character 
and temperament we shall do well to avoid 
every tendency to fault-finding and hyper- 
criticism. We'll not only be giving 
ourselves a better chance of success, but be 
helping to make life pleasanter and tasks 
lighter for the other fellows. 

Do justice to the work of others and 
don't cavil. Be more ready to praise and 
less willing to condemn. 



SWEATING SHOW WINDOWS. 

Referring to the article on keeping show 
windows from sweating, which appeared in 
Iron Age, of May 31, W. P. Walter's Sons 
of Philadelphia, Pa., write to that journal 
as follows : 

"The writer read it with interest, and 
concurs with you in regard to the main 
point of keeping the temperature of the 
window the same as outdoors. There is, 
however, one point which seems to have 
been overlooked by your correspondents, 
and that is the kind of goods shown in the 
window. For building hardware and house- 
keeping supplies it may answer very well 
to have direct communication with the out- 
side air ; but it will not answer where the 
window is filled with fine machinists' tools, 
as we know from experience that the out- 
side air will rust the steel rules, micrometers, 
etc., and the dust will enter through the 
holes no matter how fine the mesh of the 
wire placed over them. Wire of fine 
enough mesh to exclude the dust will also 
exclude most of the air. For fine tools a 
can of ' Humidine ' in the window is better 
than the outside air." 



WORK WITHOUT WORKS 

Among the specific things that lead to 
work without works, says Stoves and Hard- 
ware Reporter, the following may be 
enumerated : Trying to sell one quality of 
goods when another quality is wanted ; 
selling on credit when cash is just as easy 
and more profitable ; working to save the 
pennies and allowing the dollars to care for 
themselves ; hiring inefficient help when 
good help is obtainable ; paying small wages 
in order to obtain the results that are reached 
only by well-paid labor ; trying to obtain 
credit when credit needs protection and will 
not stand enlargement ; wasting energies on 
old goods when new goods are wanted, and, 
in some cases, attempting to do a large 
business in a small town. There are many 
other causes that might be mentioned, but 
they are all included under those given. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN 
PRODUCTS. 

THE following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the office of the High Com- 
missioner in London during the fortnight 
ending July 13 : 

1. An old established firm of whisky blenders in 
Scotland who have not been represented in Canada 
heretofore are desirous of hearing from responsit^ 
agents in the different Provinces. 

2. A Constantinople firm have a customer who 
desires to place a contract with a Canadian house 
for a large quantity of lard and mutton tallow, to 
be taken as required within six or nine months. 
They also express a desire to represent Canadian 
firms who wish to push their goods in the Orient. 

3. A London firm desires to get into communica- 
tion with Canadian shippers of frozen salmon, 
poultry and provisions with a view to acting as 
agents. 

4. The manufacturers of lawn tennis goods, 
croquet, lawn bowls and other games inquire for 
names of firms in Canada importing such goods. 

5. Inquiry has again been made for exporters of 
wood-flour by parties able to take large quantities 
of the commodity. 

6. A Belgian firm desire to hear of Canadian 
houses who might be disposed to take up the sale 
of their rice starch and ultramarine blue (in 
powder and balls). 

[The names of the firms making the above 

inquiries will be supplied on application to 

the editor of Hardware and Metal. 

When inquiring kindly give date of issue 

and number of paragraph.] 



Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the follow- 
ing inquiries : 

1 . A South of England firm claiming a connec- 
tion with the creamery industries asks if there are 
any Canadian houses prepared to ship regular sup- 
plies of cream suitable for butter making. 

2. An importer in Trieste (Austria), asks for 
names of Canadian shippers of tallow and grease. 

3. A Midlands manufacturer of steel trunks, deed 
boxes, etc., wishes to be placed in communication 
with Canadian importers cf these lines. 

4. A London import and export house would 
like to hear from Canadian firms interested in 
chemicals, oils and general produce. 

5. A Belgian firm wishes to hear from Canadian 
houses prepared to take up the sale ot their guaran- 
teed pure rice starch, and also those interested in 
ultramarine blue in powder or balls. 

6. A Yorkshire company manufacturing confec- 
tionery wishes to arrange for the introduction into 
Canada of their butter-scotch and kindred articles. 

7. Another inquiry has been received for names 
of Canadian producers of wood flour, for which 
article there is apparently a large demand here. 



A STORY FOR PAPA. 

There is a moral in this little story of child 
life: 

"Mamma," asked little three-year-old 
Freddie, "are we going to Heaven some 
day?" /■ 

"Yes, dear, I hope so," was the reply. 

"I wish papa could go, too," continued 
the little fellow. 

"Well, and don't you think he will?" 
asked his mother. 

"Oh, no." replied Freddie; "he could 
not leave his business ! " 



Large quantities of scrap iron, from the 
Ottawa fire, are shipped to Montreal and 
Quebec daily to be recast. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"MIDLAND" 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 



r' 



Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writs for Prices to Sales Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 




We Manufacture^^- 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All oar goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CUHHENT JVTRKKET QUOTATIONS 



August 3, 1900. 
These prices are tor such qualities and 
q > intities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of oredit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desiie 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

ME'ALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 36 37 

traits 36 37 

Tlnplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.C., usual sizes $7 00 

IX., " 8 50 

„ I-X.X., " 10 00 

Famous— 

{•?V 8 51 

. I-X.X 9 50 

Raven A Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 5 25 

{•$.. " 6 25 

}**i 7 25 

I. XXX., 8 25 

D.C., 12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 50 

D.X.X 750 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. , usual sizes 4 60 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 85 

20x28 9 50 

Charcoal Plates— Tern e 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.O., 20x28. 112 sheets 9 50 

I.X., Terne Tin 1150 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb 
X X.,14i56,50sheetbx8 ) 

" 14x60 " 017 07V, 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08V, 

26 " 08% 09 ' 

28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

„ Base Price 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs 2 00 2 10 

Refined " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 50 

Hocp steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 25 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 35 

Tire Steel % 55 

Alachinery 2 60 

//-W Steel, per lb 00 00 

Toe Calk Steel 2 8J 

Tank Plates, 1-5 and thicker. 3 00 3 25 

Boiler Rivets 4 50 5 00 

Boiler Tabes. 

1%-inoh 13 14 

\„ " 15 16 

3% 18 19 

3 19 20 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

% inoh 3 25 

3-16 inoh 3 40 

\ noh and thicker 3 25 

Black Sheets. 

IS gauge 320 

i£. „. g * UKe 3 20 

22to2< ' 330 

£ 34) 

28 3 60 



Canada Plates. 

All dull,52 sheets 3 35 

Half polished 3 50 

A.11 bright 4 U0 

Iron Pipe. 

Discounts are as follows -Black pipe, % to 
j& in., 40 per cent. % in. , 60 per icut. ",to 
2 in , 66-'.. per cent, larger sizes, 50 and 5 
per cent. Galvanized pipe, % i Q , 40 per 
cent. % to 2 in , 50 per cent. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 

G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16 gauge .... 4 41 4 25 

18 to 24 gauge 4 50 4 2J 4 40 4 50 

26 " 4 75 4 45 4 4) 4 75 

28 " 5 00 4 70 4 60 5 00 

Less than case lots, 15c. per 100 lb. additional 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 
Proo Coil, 3-16in., per 1001b .... 

% " .... 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 85 5 35 

% " " 4 8) 5 30 

7-16 ' " 4,50 4 95 

% " " ... 4 65 

% " " ... 4 20 

% " " .... 4 15 

% " " 3 70 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 4') and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 30 and 10 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis ; 
count 40 p.c 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 19% 20% 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cutlengths, ound,%to%in. 23% 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
Untinned ,14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 23 23% 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz, irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4i6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25% 

35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boiler and T. K. Pitts. 

P ain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 
Roll and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge , 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 07 07% 

Domestic " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 07 

Partcasks 06% 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 05 05% 

Bar, lib 06'* 

heets.2%lhs. sq. ft., by roll 05^ 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., ' 05% 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths ins at 7% cents. 



Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per HO lb. ; chilled, $7.C0 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and bal', $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% p c Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on medium and extra 
heavy, and 45 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb 

Bar half-and-half 21% 2;% 

Refined 21 21% 

Wiping 20% 21 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brandsvary according to composition. 
Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead . Percwt 
Pure, Assoc, guarantee, ground in oil 

251b. irons 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50" 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No. 4 do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant 8now White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 19 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks , 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 f>0 

No. I, kegs 6 00 

Prepared Paints. 
Iu %• % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 135 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 1 20 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

FrenchlmperialGreen 19 

Colors, Dry. 
Yellow Ochre (J. C.( bbls .... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J. F.L.8.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), percwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, percwt S 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt .. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, percwt 175 2 00 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93 p e. 2 00 2 25 
Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

riolden Oobre .... 01\ 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 10O lb 100 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb 07 



Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45, lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying , per lb 07 

100-lb.lots, do. per lb 08 

Patty. 

Bladders in bbl* J 10 

Bladders in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or bxs 2 25 

Bulk in bbls., per 100 1 95 

Bulk in less quantities 2 10 

25-lb. tins, 4 in case 2 35 

12%-lb. tins, 8 in case 2 60 

Varnishes. 

(In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

" body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, f.xtra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Deuiar 3 3 1 ) 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 160 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

'' No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Discount— general trade discount, 50 per 
ctnt and four months' time: special cash 
eiscount of 3 per cent in thirty days, or 3% 
per cei t. spot cash. 

The Imperia 
Varnish & Color 
Co's , Limited 
Elast ilite Varnish, 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2 01. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2 00. 

Maple Leaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, COc. ; 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 2Cc. each. 




Linseed Oil. 

Raw. Boiled. 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 86 SO 89 

5 to 9 bbls " 85 E8 

Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, Quebec, 

London, Ottawa, Kingston and Guelph 
2c. less. 

Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... 69 

2 to 4 barrels " " .... 68 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, Guelph, 2c. less. 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . 10 10% 

" " small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

Cod Oil, per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 

" Neatsfoot 

Glne. 

Common 08% 09 

French Medal 14 '4% 

Cabinet, sheet IS 13 

White, extra 18 30 

Gelatine 022 030 

Strip 18 SO 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






\ Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

^ Limited 



• 

J 
I 

t 

I 



SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Caps. Dom., 50 and 5 percent,. 
Rim Fire Pistol, die. 45 p. o., Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5p o. 
Rim Fire, Military, net list, Amer. 
Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 18 P.O. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom- 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili 

tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
net list. B. B. Caps, discount 45 per cent. 
Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. 
Brass :>hot Sheila, 55 and 10 per cent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

Dags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-ib. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of oOO each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5and6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Anvils. .lb. 09 09% 
Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 

Augers. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 and 15 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33 x /3 percent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 3 90 4 00 

Copper, discount 40 and 10 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

" " " 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A perlb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
Amerioan make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 15 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 27% per cent. 



Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per pross. . . . 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Norway Bolls, full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, full square K5 

*' " 5-15 and under 6 J 

" % and larger 55 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts , square 4c off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 6" 

Stove Bolts 60 and 10 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 55 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis,No.8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 11 00 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 60 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 80 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6u per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulic 1 00 1 10 

Chalk. 
Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon , per gross 14 18 



Chisels. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 

Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
Churns . 

K evolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.50— ^0.2. $9.d0 — Mo. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts: Delivered from factories, f8 
p.c. ; from sto k in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days, 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Wa'hout 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 5 25 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Richelieu 4 75 

Emb. Richelieu 5 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 65 

" oval, 17x14 in 155 

" 19x15 in 2 30 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 

American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles . Urn in . 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33V 3 per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

"6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey'R Rod, per doz (15 p.i.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 W 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach aLd Wa^on, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL Bl'l'B. 

Morse, dis.. 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard, dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No.l.perdnz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz 1 60 

Bright, '20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 27% percent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACIORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 per cent, to 60, 

10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent 
revised list. 

FRUIT PRESSES. 

Henis', per doz 3 25 3 50 

Shepard's Queen City, dis. 15 per cent. 
GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under 26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 00 

26 to 40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

11 to 50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 Oil ... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 75 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 7 25 .... 14 CO 

91to95 15 50 

96 to 100 18 00 

101 to 105 21 00 

106toll0 24 00 

llltoll5 28 00 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. So to 65 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each.. . 1 65 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 

," %bo% 

Leatm r, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 

" l^in., " 5 15 

Web, — per doz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 lo 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 1 10 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb 22 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 150 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 100 

Plane. 

American, pergross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs 

Steel barn door 5 85 

Stearns. 4 inch 

" 5 inch 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-f*,.run 

No. 11%, 10-ft. run 

No. 12,10-ft.run 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot. . .. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., perlb 06'/ 



9 00 
14 00 

1 00 
5 20 

2 45 



dis. 

1 20 

08% 

25 

2 00 

1 50 



1 25 

3 75 



6 00 

5 00 

6 50 


8 40 
10 80 
12 60 

21 00 
4% 



5-in.| 



10-in., 



'% 

06'/< 

16 

05 3 4 

05% 



Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pair 

Spring 12 U0 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 

Harness, per doz 72 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 



1 10 
63 

88 
3 00 

1 00 

dis. 



"O" 
"IT 



brand 50 
brand 50 



p.c. dis. I 
p.c. J 



Oval head. 



Acadian, ountersunk head and oval 
top, 50 and 10 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FDR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



Special list of low-priced Japanned 
and Regalvanized Wire Cloth. 

o 

24, 30, 36 in. wire, in 50 ft. rolls. 

SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes, and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. 3 65 3 9J 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 85 4 10 

Featherweight (all sizes) 5 10 5 10 

F.O.B. Toronto. Hamilton, Londin and 
Guelph, 10c per keg additional. 

Toe weight iteel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 4) and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KBTTLB8. 
Brass spun, 7% P-c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lh 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEY8. 
Lock, Can., dis., i7% p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock. 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door kn->bs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 1 > per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 50 

No. 1 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blait 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. e«ra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis. 33 l n p.c. 

Russell & Erwin, per doz 3 05 3 25 

Cabinet- 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 

English and Am., per doz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 15 to 17% p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCK8 

J,««adian, per doz 8 50 100 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 60 $4 10 

3d 3 25 S 77 

4and5d 3 00 3 60 

6and7d 2 90 3 45 

8and9d 2 75 3 25 

lOand 12d 2 70 3 20 

16and20d 2 65 3 15 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 6] 3 10 

Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 

Mis .^llaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per c?nt. 

Coopers' nails, dis. SO per cent. 

Flour t arrsl nails, dis 25 per cent 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 1 85 3 50 



NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 40 and 5 per cent, for McMullen's. 
OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. 8. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Canada refined (Toronto) 13% 

Sarnia Water White 15 

Pratt's Astral 18 

Sarnia, Prime White 14 

American w. w 16% 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Duff erin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 1 50 3 00 

Brass head, " .... 40 1 00 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 55 per cent. 

American dis. 55. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 37% 

to 40 per cent. 
Bailey's (Stan. R. & L. Co.), 50 to 50 and 5 p.c. 
Miscellaneous, dis. 25 to 27% per cent. 
Bailey's Victor, 25 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 
English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPER8. 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37' ■;. 
40 p.c. 

Button 8 Imitation, per doz. . 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 

Impression work, discount, 60 per cent. 

Fuller's wjrk, discount 65 per cent. 

Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent 

Jenkins' disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 

Standard valves, discount, CO per per cent. 

Jenkins 1 radiator valves discount 55 per cent. 
" " standard, dis, 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valve3, discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No. 4%, " 3 00 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS 

Canadian cistern 180 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 7 25 

35 " 8 15 

40 " 9 25 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

'' 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable Canadian list dis. 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 



RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 
RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile b Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Carriage, Section, Wagon Box Rivets, etc., 

50 pc. 
Black M. Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 50 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets & Burrs, 35 p.c. dis., and 

cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets in 

%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Burrs, iron or steel, 45 per cent. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9% 13% 

%in 10% 14% 

% and5-16in 12 15% 

Cotton base, %-inch and 

larger 14% 15 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New ealand Rope 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set- 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, poliphed 75 

" No. 50, nickle -plated.... 80 

Usual rebate on 12 and 50 i ate lots. 
SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SFOl'TS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz... 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand, Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. & D. , dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs.... 3 25 

Solid, " 1 50 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SET8. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES 
Gurney Scales, 45 p.c. 
B. 8. * M. Scales, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H, iron, and steel, 80 p.c. 
Wood R. H.. " dis. 75 p.o. 
" F. H, brass, dis. 75 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 67%p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 67% p.c. 
R.H. " 62% p.c. 

Drive Screws, 80 per cent. 

Bench, wood, per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

8CYTHE8. 
Discount, per doz, net 9 CO 15 00 



8CYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS 
Bailey Cutlery Co . full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Heinisch, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 
Seymour or HeiniBch tailor shears. 15 p.c 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per c«nt. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

lb. or over, per lb o 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.o. 
8TAMPED WARE. 
P.ain, dis , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

Plain 00 3 45 

Coopers', discout t 45 per ceDc 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

. " , sl'P. 009 009 

Labrador o 13 

_ " Al « 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas o 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross S 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

6 inch Per 100 lengths 8 00 

7 '•"■•> " • ...'. 8 50 

8tove Polish. 




No. 4 — 3 dozen in case, net cash . ... $4 80 

No. 6—3 dozen in case, " 8 40 

TACK8 BRADS, ETC. 

Percent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 & 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80'. 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80*5 

* " t ; nned 80 & 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ,.75 4 15 

" % weights 60 

Swedes, cnt tacks, blued and tinned — 

In bulk SO* 1C 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85 1 12% 

" brush, blued A tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued tinned and 

japanned 75*12% 

Zinc tacks 

Leather carpet vacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52% 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^^g^= 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

MANUFACTURERS ^^ ■ ■ a ■ * ■ 

' — CHAIN 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB. „ A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Montreal ' -Canadian Representatives- ftontrefi. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin eapped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 2i p c. 
Game, H. &N„ P. S. & W.. 65 p.o 
Same, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

8. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 21 

Wrapping, mottled, per pack. 50 60 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb 17 18 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and W^hite, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire. 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, 83.00 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, d 



vance 7o. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9. base- 
No. 10, advance 7c— No. 11, 14c— No. 12, 
20c.-No. 13, 35c— No. 14. 47c— No 15, 
60c— No. 16,75c Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c — special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
— spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c- in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c —in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, " dis. 15 per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, $5.50- No. 19. $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 2:', S7.3U— No. 23, 
$7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
$9.50— No. 27, $10-No. 28 $ll-No 29, 
$12- No. 30, $13— No. 31, $14— No 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $<?. Coppered, 5c- oil- 
ing, 10c. — in 25-1' . bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c — 
in %-lh. hanks, 75c- in M-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb.— No*. 6, 7, 8, $3.95 
No. 9, J3.20— No. 10, $».10-No. 11, $4.15 
No. 12, $3 35- No. 13, $3.45— No. 14, 
$4 50— No. 15, $5.00— No. 16. $5.25. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 
per 1,000 feet 



3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B 
Galvanized, 4 barb, Vfy. and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 25 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 25 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. i leveUi d, $2.95 in 

Ipss than catlots, snd S3.C5 in carlots. 

Terms. 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 

Ross braid truss cable 4 50 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . . 2 00 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37M per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
foe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 
Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., perdoz 5 80 6 00 

G. i K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, perdoz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent.: terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 
Canadian make, discount, 25 per cent. 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



IKCOBPOEATED 1895. 



Enamelled Ware 



We make 7 Different Qualities : 





"Crescent" 
"Premier" 
"Princess" 
White 
Blue and White 
"Star" Decorated 
White Decorated 

"Crescent" Steel Agateware takes the lead. It is a light mottled grey color, and, owing to the 
ingredients used in the manufacture of this ware, it is not brittle and will not chip or burn. 

The large variety of our lines are unequalled. Principal lines are carefully packed in crates of 
yi or i dozen, thus insuring purchaser safe delivery. 

Catalogues and Prices on Application. 



THE TH0S. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



SEND for specimen oopy of Phillips' Monthly Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new anil 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
estaliliHhcd and must successful medium in the world. 
Established 25 yrarn for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to those who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per ODnum, all over (bo 
world, and is OMd for OOOttnasJ reference by a larrfe number 
of linn*. It is COMOqnentll a most valuable advertising 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers Subscription, 
6s. per annum, price per copy, 6d. Sole Proprietor, CllAS. 
1) 1'iiii.i.iiH, MI M K ,. Newport. Mon , England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon.' 

WHY sharpen your bar of steel ? 
USE only "Aylmer Drills." 
OLD fashioned drills waste time and money. 
WAYS change as inventions multiply 
Send for circular and prices to 
WM. J. CRAWFORD, 
Boom 39, Canada Life Building, MONTREAL. 

R C. LeVESCONTE 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc 

Thb MoKinnon Buildino 
Cor. Jordan and Melinda Streets 



TORONTO 



Telephone 689. 

Cable "LeVesoonte" Toronto. 



CATCH PHRASESMDEAS Tl 

A Utile book worth Us weioM in gold 
To All who Write Ads, Show Cards, Cir- 
culars or other Business Literature. 
The price is 50c, but you can get it 
^ ■% ■■ p by simply filling out one of our 
LULL blanks, which will be sent you 
I I ILL promptly on request. Address 
The Advertising World, Columbus, Ohio. 




IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO. 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



T R E N T_C ANAL. 

SIMCOE-BALSAM LAKE DIVISION. 
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS. 

SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned 
and endorsed " Tender for Trent Canal,'' will be 
received at this Office until noon Friday, 14th August, 
1900, for the construction of about thirteen miles of Canal 
between Kirkfield and Lake Simcoe, which will be divided 
into two Sections. 

Plans, specifications of the work and forms of Contract 
can be seen at the office of the Chief Engineer of the 
Department of Railways and Canals, at Ottawa, or at the 
Superintending Engineer's Office, Peterborough, where 
forms of tender can be obtained on and after Tuesday, 

.'h July, 1000. 

"in ihe case of firms there must be attached the actual 
. matures of the full name, the nature of the occupation 
and place of residence of each member of the same, and, 
further, an accepted bank cheque for the sum of $15,000 
must accompany ihe tender for each section ; these 
accepted cheques must be endorsed over to the Minister of 
Railways and Canals, and will be forfeited if the parties 
tendering decline entering into contract for work at the 
rates and terms stated in the offer submitted. The 
accepted cheques thus sent in will be returned to the 
respective parties whose tenders are not accepted. 

The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. 
By order, 

L. K. JONES, 

Secretary. 
Department of Railways and Canals, 1 
Ottawa, July 16th, 1000. J 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without author- 
ity fiom the Department will not be paid for it. (31) 



73 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1823. 



73 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEIIMISCH'S SONS CO. Ka y r K.?. ff ^I:a 90 Ch " ,b * r " st 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



Wobles 8f Ho arc. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 




MARK 



LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 



[ARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices throughout the civilized world. 

Executive Offices : 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and the con- 
trolling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, by the 
merchants, tor the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort Is spared, and no 
reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an authority on all matters affecting 
commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It furnishes 
Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, liduciaiy and business corporations. Bpedfle 
terms may be obtained by addressing the company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY 



Toronto Office : Cor. Melinda and Jordan Sts. 
Hamilton Office : No. 39 James Street South. 
London Office : No. 365 Richmond Street. 



Winnipeg Office : No. 398 Main Street. 
Vancouver Office: Cor. Hastings and Hamilton ! 
Victoria Office : Board of Trade Building. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen.-Mgr., Western Canada, Toronto, Ont. 



PERFECTION 
AUTOMATIC 
REVOLVER. 



NEW Automatic shell extracting, 
" fc " double action, small frame. 
Weighs 12 oz. Rebounding lock. 32 
caliber. 5 shot. 

Made with shorter barrel for bicycle 
use. 

The most perfect small pistol made. 




Forehand 
Arms Co. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



Manufacturers of 
the 

Forehand Guns 

Worcester, 
Mass. 



Stanley Rule 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. ** LeVcl V*0. 

IMPROVED CARPENTERS' TOOLS. 



SOLD BY ALL HARDWARE DEALERS. 



r 



: 



Bit. 1968 




Inc. 1855 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




i 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



!! 



THERE ARE A DOZEN DIFFERENT KINDS OF 

SOLID RUBBER TIRES 

FOR CARRIAGES 



Ninety per cent, of all the 
Rubber Tires in use in New 
York City are the 

"Kelly- 
Springfield." 

WHY? 




rATZNTED, 




Sole Manufacturers in Canada 



The Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO. LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 

61-63 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO, ONT. 

Factories— 115-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



Ingot Tin, 

"BANCA" 

Ingot Tin, 



LAMB & FLAG" 



Ingot Copper, 
Zinc Spelter, 
Sheet Zinc, 
Antimony, 
Pig Lead. 

From Stock and to Import. 

Enquiries Solicited. 



B.&S. H.THOMPSON &C0'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar- brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 



/WWVWW^WWWWVWWW 



Galvanized Corrugated Sheets 

"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



swwvwwwwwwwt -WW*. 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



, Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Gauge and Lubricator Glasses, 
Langwell's Manufacture, 

Montreal 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, AUGUST II, 1900 



NO. 32 



•TANDEM" UTI-FROOI METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
Toe Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed, 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH & McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 
THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 




~r^ 



The largest smelters of Anti-Friction 
Metals in Europe. 



the QUEEN'S the HEAD 

OF THE EMPIRE 



AND 



Queen's Head 

IS THE BEST IRON USED 
IN THE EMPIRE. 




CANADA 



BRISTOL, ENG . 
and MONTREAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, LIMITED-^ 

A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, MONTREAL 



v 




PROSPERITY 




One thing is certain — the contractor who installs The 
SanWd Radiators wins the confidence of those whom he deals 
with. " Confidence begets success," and success means " pros- 
perity." The " Safford " is the original invention in screw- 
threaded nipple connections for Steam and Hot Water heating 

— all others are imitators. The " Safford " cannot leak, 

because there are no rods, bolts or packings. 

Think of the damage to a contractor's reputation that the 
installation of leaky radiators can do ! 



The Safford Radiators 



have been recommended 
by the leading architects in the country — they have been installed in the largest 
public buildings — they have received the highest awards at all public exhibitions 
since the World's Fair. We have a free illustrated booklet which we would like to 
send you, because we believe that there is "prosperity " ahead for every contractor 
or dealer who will read it. Every statement in the booklet is backed up by the 
largest Radiator manufacturers under the British flag — 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Fishing Tackle 



IH t HUMH 



TROLLING LINES 
RODS and REELS 
BAIT PAILS 
HOOKS 
LANDING NETS 
DISGORGERS, Etc. 



Sporting Goods 



HM H HHM 



BASEBALL 

LACROSSE 

GOLFING 

TENNIS 

CRICKET 

QUOITS 



S 
U 

P 
P 

L 
I 

E 
S 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Sts., 



INI 






£ 
£ 
£ 
£ 
£ 



£ 
£ 



£ 
£ 



THE 



Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 



of ONTARIO, limited. 



Manufacturers of 



I Bar Iron and Steel 
| Nails, Spikes 
| Horse Shoes 



^ 



• • 



Bolts, Washers, etc. 



3 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



n 



Belleville, 
Ontario, I 



^ 
^ 



HUUIUUJUJUJIUIUUW^^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



THRESHING 
BELTS 



4K 




W*-- -' 



with these brands 
insure the best 
of wear for the 
money. 



The Canadian Rubber 
Co. of Montreal, 






MONTREAL, 




S^H; 




MONTREAL, ^jS^tXnbT^S. 
TORONTO, <£K ^ V> 

WINNIPEG. X0K ftj»AMtt .<«/ 



WINNIPEG. 



^*y 



SOME OF THE NEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




No. 15 "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT AND LEFT HAND, AND RIGID, WITH FINGER TURN ON BLADE— 2, 3, 4 and 5-in. BLADES. 




No. 20 " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT HAND ONLY, AND RIGID. 3 SIZES, EXTREME LENGTH OPEN, INCLUDING BIT— 14, 17 and 19-inches. 

Sold by Leading Jobbers NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

throughout the Dominion. Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you experience difficulty with other twine, 

try "Plymouth." 



TRADE 




MARK 



it 



THE STAMP OF EXCELLENCE." 



HARVEST TIME. 



We can fill repeat orders with great promptness, as we have Binder 
Twine stocks at London, Toronto and Ottawa. 

Order as you sell, every day, and telegraph (expense) when in a hurry. 



^■btor.: PLYMOUTH BINDER TWINE AGENCY, S4 Ba, T & ONT o 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



We carry in stock a full line of the following goods : 



Antimony. 

Brass— Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 

Copperine and Babbitt. 
Cotton Waste. 
Crucibles. 

Eave Trough— Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 
Glue — English and French. 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 

Galvanized, ' Gordon" Crown and "Apollo," 

Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 
Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 
Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 
Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard. 
Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 
Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 
Tin— Bar. 

Ingot, "L. & F." and Straits. 
Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 
Zinc — Sheets and Block. 

PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ICE CREAM FREEZERS 

The Latest 
and Best. 

The 
Ideal" 



u 



will make cream in two 
to five minutes, accord- 
ing to quantity. 

SIMPLE 
PRACTICAL 
VERY RAPID 
ECONOMICAL 



Write for Circular and 
Prices. 




Wood, Vallance & Co.,hm!I££^m 



Branch House : George D. Wood & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Toronto Office: 88 York Street— H. T. Eager. 



L , 


r ' 


* • 



WOOD. VALLANCE & CO.. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



GEO. D. WOOD & CO., 

Iron Merchants 

Importers of British and Foreign 

HARDWARE. 

WINNIPEG, Canada. 



CORDAGE . . 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 



Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables and 



Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"FIRMUS" 
Orders will 



Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila hemp obtainable, 
not be accepted for second quality or "mixed" goods. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



Toronto Branch 27 FBONT ST. WEST. 
TEL. 94. Wm. B. Stewart, Agent. 



Montreal y Que. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



it 



The Oxford 400 Series 



M 



Our latest construction for heating by warm air. 

Made with steel plate radiator — and supplied 
either portable or for brick setting. 

They combine enormous power with gratifying 
economy — having many improved points of con- 
struction that will be thoroughly interesting to all 
furnace men. 

Read them up in our new catalogue — or if you haven't received one yet 
write us at once. 

There'll be big business in handling such an improved line this Fall. 




THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 



TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



The 



Aiier Gasoline 



LAMP 



100 Candle 
Power. 



No. I $7.50 

5 STYLES 



AUER LIGHT CO. 

MONTREAL 




SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
OR MONEY REFUNDED. 

Approved by Can. Fire Under* 
writers' Association. 



SEND 

FOR 

CATALOGUE. 



. . . Defiance 

Cold 

Blast 

Lantern 




With Patent Fluted 
Plate, by which the air is 
admitted so as to come m 
contact with the Globe, so 
tending to keep it cool. 

Sold by Leading 
Jobbers. 



Manufactured by_ 



W. W. CHOWN & CO. 



Belleville, Ontario. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ctfirKUor; (find. 



Buy the Best. 



M 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by aU Wholesale Dealers 



lelox Smokeless Shotgun Powder 

The cleanest, quickest and best of all. Hard grain, quick ignitio,., rapid 
combustion, slight residuum, no corroding of gun barrel or locks, b 
velocity, even pattern, great penetration, minimum pressure and recoil. 

Excellent keeping qualities, not affected by climatic influences. 

Safe, reliable, accurate, and pleasant to shoot. 

Absolutely Smokeless. 16-oz. to the pound. 

FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS WRITE TO 

HARRY C. MARLATT, General Sales Agent, SI/V1COE, ONT. 

ROUND RE-ACTING 
WASHER 



Quickest gelling Washing Machine on the 

market. 
None more satisfactory to dealers or users. 
Every home requires a good Washing 

.Machine. 

Every Merchant should handle them. 
Prices and full particulars on application. 



THE 



Dowswell Manufacturing Co, 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents : W. L. Haldimand it Son 
Montreal, Que. 




MOORE BROS. 

LIMITED. 

' BRASS and IRON 

FOUNDERS 

Birmingham, England. 



TRADE MARK. 




8323 ox** 8203 < ^ ... r V3 

(? 




8395 



The original and sole manufacturers of the M.B. patent 
finished electro-brassed goods. Note the "Beehive" trade 
mark, and beware of imitations. 

All goods put up in cardboard boxes. 

Samples or illustrated lists free on application. 



ISLAND CITY 




The best way for a hardware dealer to insure the success 
of his business is to handle 

The Island City Mixed Paints 
Floor Paint dries hard in 8 hours 
The Island City Varnishes 
The Island City White Lead 
The Island City Pure Colors in Oil 
and Japan. 

Customers are sure when they buy our Island City Paints 
that they get the best value for their money. 

P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, l88 • |9 M oST C §E l llL. tr9et • 

TORONTO, HALIFAX, WINNIPEG. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW TO SAVE GAS Peebles' Automatic Gas Governors 







limiiiiiinimTiffl 
Gas, Fire and Stove Governor. House Governor Burner. Governor for Incandescents. Mercurial Governor for Fixing at Meter. 

Sole Manufacturers, D. BRUCE PEEBLES & CO., Tay Works, Edinburgh, Scotland. 






2X2MESH 

I c MullenS 
Poultry Netting 

Galvanize 

N9I9 STEEL 
WIRE 



McMULLEN'S 

POULTRY NETTINGS and LAWN FEN CINGS are not 



<c> 



surpassed in the world. 

Their WOVEN WIRE FENCINGS have stood years of successful 
testing ; special offers are now made on HOG FENCINGS. 

All of the above goods are manufactured by THE ONTARIO WIRE 
FENCING CO., Limited, of Picton, Ont., and are sold by 

OF HAMILTON and 

MONTREAL. 

Limited. 

GENERAL AGENTS ; ALSO BY THE CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



The B. Greening Wire Co., 



Agent for Railway Fencing 



MR. JAMES COOPER, Montreal. 



Kemps 

STANDARD 
ONE-PIECE ELBOWS. 

Introduced to the trade in 1897 and proved to be the best 
Stove Pipe Elbow ever produced. 

They are made out of Extra Heavy Smooth Steel in two 
qualities. 

The improved process of manufacture produces a short turn, 
therefore less material is used, and, consequently, less weight per 
dozen, which results in a great reduction in freight, and a re- 
duced cost to the buyer. 

Made in STEEL, in 5, 6, 7 and 8-inch. 

Made in GALVANIZED IRON, in 7 and 8-inch. 

Made in TIN, in 7 and 8-inch. 




St r n gest/E J^fbw 1»»dV, 
Attractive^ in an$rjfoc+. 
Coated so as to preverftYpst. 
Riveted ready for use. 
Will not get damaged in 




Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



Toronto, 
Canada. 




VOL XII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO. AUGUST II, 

President, ance l0 the Dominion, as well as to the 

fOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. Provinces down by the sea. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. "The Development of Canadian Trade 

Limited. with the West Indies," " Development of 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- tm^m, ~-j «- - ■ i_j..„*_:^„ >• <■ aj,.,;. A/r_:i 

cuiate in the Provinces of British Columbia, Iron and Steel Industries, Atlantic Mail 

North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, „ ., t, . c r- j .. .-r. r 

Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, p.e. Service on the Basis of Speed, " Prefer- 

lsland and Newfoundland. 

ential Trade within the Empire, "Better 

omens r 

Montreal - - - - Board of Trade Building, Hotel and Other Accommodation for Tour- 

Telephone 1155. 

Toronto it Front street West, ists " and " Rates of Freights on Apples " 

Telephone ai48. 

London, enq. - - - - IO g Fleet Stree^E.c., are certainly subjects which have more than 

MANCHESTER, ENQ. - - - 18 4i Ann^reS; a local signification. 

Winnipeg .... western-Canada Bioek! Among the subjects to be discussed which 

ST. JOHN, N. B. ... No. 3 Market Wharf. , ... 

I. Hunter white are of a more purely local character are 

NEW YORK. 150 Nassau Street, 

Edwin h. Haven. "Legislative Union of the Maritime Pro- 

Travelling Subscription Agents : vinces," " What Can Be Done to Attract a 

T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 
Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. Desirable ClaSS Of Immigrants tO the Man- 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - - 12s. n • 11 • • T-i ■■ mr -i cs 

time Provinces, " Daily Mail Service 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address i Adscript, London Between St. John and Digby Throughout 

' the Year" and " Curriculum of our Schools 

in Relation to our Industrial and Commer- 
cial Advancement." 

Among those who take part in the 
annual deliberations of the board are some 
of the brightest and most capable business 

THE MARITIME BOARD OF TRADE. men in *' Maritime Provinces, and there is 

I„ -. , . no reason to think that the convention, 
1" the subjects to be discussed are any 

..• . , . . which opens on August 15, in Kentville, 

criterion, the sixth annual convention 3 

of the Board of Trade of the Maritime W " 1 b * *" ^epUon to the ru le. 

Provinces, which opens in Kentville, N.S., T4 . . 4 , , .. 

' It is a good time when trade is quiet for 

on August 1 s, should be a decidedly interest- .. . „ .. .. . 

■ ' the merchant to allow his ideas to become 

ig and a profitable one. , 

r activt. 

Naturally one might expect an organiza* 

tion like the Maritime Board of Trade to KEEP STOCKS ASSORTED. 

deal with questions which would chiefly Just as it is not wise to buy heavily when 

concern the Maritime Provinces, but the prices are depreciating, so it is unwise to go 

draft programme which has been issued to the other extreme and not buy sufficiently 

jointly by President DeWolfe and Secretary to keep stocks assorted. 

Calkin shows that there is scarcely an item Inability to fill an order may mean 

on that programme which is not of import- inability to keep a customer. 



1900 



NO. 32. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIRADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



HONORS FOR A BUSINESS MAN. 

THE new Lieutenant-Governor of Nova 
Scotia, the Hon. A. G. Jones, is a 
practical business man. 

At 18 years of age he struck out for him- 
self, going to Halifax and securing employ- 
ment as a bookkeeper with T. C. Kinniar, 
a West-Indian merchant and shipowner. 
He rendered faithful services, and in 1850 
he obtained his reward in the shape of a 
partnership. The partnership lasted 22 
years and then Mr. Kinniar died. The 
firm of A. G. Jones & Co. then came into 
existence, like its predecessor being engaged 
in the West Indian trade. It is still 
engaged in the same business. 

Mr. Jones has had his experience in 
public as well as in business life. At Con- 
federation he became a member of the 
Dominion Parliament, representing the 
county of Halifax. He sat in the House at 
different times until 1891. At one time he 
was Minister of Militia in the Mackenzie 
Administration. He held that office when 
the Government went out of power in 1878. 
In 1897 he was appointed by the Dominion 
Government a member of the Cable Com- 
mission and went to England, where he 
participated in the discussion which took 
place in regard to the matter. 

Some good business men have been 
appointed to the Senate, and a business 
man has now been appointed Lieutenant* 
Governor of Nova Scotia. It looks as if 
Governments were beginning to realize the 
value of business men for public service. 



The unusually hot weather of the last few 
days has caused many to wish that Canada 
was indeed the " Lady of the Snows." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION IN CANADA. 



RAILROAD construction on this con- 
tinent is showing increased activity. 
And Canada is sharing in it. 

New lines, extensions and improvements 
on which building is in progress in Canada 
number 36, while a year ago there were but 
22. Six months ago the number was 33. 
Our authority is The Railroad Gazette. 

In the United States, the new lines, exten- 
sions, etc., number 407, against 347 six 
months ago, and 255 a year ago. 

If the extension of the railway mileage in 
Canada is at all commensurate with the 
subsidies, Provincial and Federal, which 
have been granted this year, we may look 
for a large increase in the mileage of the 
Canadian railway system. 

The Dominion Parliament alone voted 
$3,500,000 in railway subsidies during the 
session which closed a few weeks ago, to 
say nothing of the grants made by Pro- 
vincial Legislatures. 

Up to the end of June, 1899, the cash 
bonuses given by Governments and muni- 
cipalities to railways in Canada aggregated 
$186,107,405. Add to these loans, $24,- 
092,800, subscriptions to shares, $3,064,- 
500, and we have $213,264,705. And, 
besides this, there are 40,000,000 acres of 
land which the railways have been granted. 
These figures do not, of course, include the 
bonuses given during the past year by the 
Federal and Provincial Governments. 

Canada has not withheld her hand in 
dealing with the railways within her borders. 
It would have been belter if she had. 

At the end of June, 1899, Canada had 
17,250 miles of railway. 



HEAT CLOSES FOUNDRIES. 

The excessive heat that Toronto has ex- 
perienced this week has caused the closing- 
down of nearly all the foundries and iron 
works, the men being unable to stand the 
combined heat of the furnaces and the 
weather. About 1,000 men are idle, and 
will not go back to work until the weather 
becomes cooler. A number of them gave 
out on Friday of last week, and have not 
been able to return to work yet. 

The men at The Poison Iron Works and 



at The Canada Foundry Co. are still strug- 
gling along, trying to pull through the hot 
weather, but, with these two exceptions, the 
foundry laborers of Toronto have been 
doing nothing so far this week. This con- 
dition of affairs is said to be without 
precedent in Toronto. 



HOTELS AND TOURIST TRAVEL. 

ONE of the chief solutions of the 
tourist question is undoubtedly 
good hotels. 
The people who travel must have good 
hotel accommodation. 

A good hotel does not necessarily mean a 
big hotel. It means simply a hotel where 
there is an ample supply of good, wholesome 
food ; where the attention is quick and 
courteous, and where the sleeping accom- 
modation is good. 

There are hotels in certain small towns in 
Canada which summer after summer are 
filled from the beginning to the end of the 
season with families from the United States. 

There are many towns, as far as natural 
conditions are concerned, which should 
attract many more tourists than these par- 
ticular places do, but they do not. And it 
can be for no other earthly reason than 
want of proper hotel accommodation. 

It is a subject which is worthy the attention 
of boards of trade and business men's asso- 
ciations of different kinds throughout the 
country. 

The average tourist purchases, as a rule, 
nothing but the best kind of goods, and he 
does not demur about paying a fair price for 
them. Consequently, the merchant cannot 
but benefit from tourist travel. And what 
he benefits from he should not hesitate to do 
his best to attract to his town. 



RAILS FOR ELECTRIC ROADS. 

There is, at the moment, in Canada, a 
decidedly active demand for rails and other 
material for electric roads. 

Many of the companies have been holding 
off in anticipation of lower prices, but, 
although these have not yet materialized, 
quite a few of the companies are now in a 
hurry to get material, and dealers in rail- 
way supplies are scurrying around the 



country trying to pick up rails from the 
steam railway companies. They want 
second hand rails if they can get them, and 
new if they cannot. 

The electric railway people are sometimes 
able to buy new rails from the steam rail- 
way companies at lower figures than they 
can import them at. This is largely due* \o- 
the fact that rails imported for steam rail- 
ways are free of duty, while on rails imported 
for electric railways the duty is 30 per cent. 



IMPORT ORDERS OF CANADA 
PLATES. 

THE Canada plates which are now 
coming forward on import orders, are 
worth, perhaps, a little more than 
passing notice. 

In the first place, they are coming for- 
ward rather earlier than usual. But that is 
because they were ordered earlier than 
usual. As a rule, importers place their 
orders for fall shipment in February and 
March, but this year, at least some of them, 
placed them in January. Their reason for 
doing so was a desire to get their orders in 
before the market reached its highest point. 

Although they are getting their shipments 
earlier, the market is, however, lower than 
when they bought, but they have some com- 
pensation in the thought that they could not 
buy at to-day's prices and get their ship- 
ments in time for this season's trade. 



DO YOUR BEST. 

It is just as easy to do a thing right when 
the habit has been acquired as it is to do it 
wrong. 

Because it is presumed that no one will 
know the difference it is a mistake not to do 
the best. 

Supposing no one did know that a certain 
duty was not performed in a proper manner 
you would suffer yourself. 

Every time a duty is improperly performed 
it is made easier to repeat the operation and 
harder to properly perform it. By-and-bye 
the habit of not putting forth the best effort 
becomes a habit. And obviously the man 
who becomes thus habituated lessens his 
usefulness and diminishes his value. 

He is a wise man who pulls himself up 
with a sharp rein when he finds himself 
disposed to make an article or wait upon a 
customer in a perfunctory manner. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS METHODS AND PARLIAMENTARY 

PRACTICES. 



WHILE business methods are so much 
more frequently disregarded than 
regarded in Parliamentary practice, 
it is not proof that representative Govern- 
vtunt is a bad and not a good thing for the 
country. 

If a merchant or a manufacturer were to 
carry on his business after the same manner 
failure would be certain. But the fact that 
some merchants do employ unbusinesslike 
methods and fail is no more proof that busi- 
ness is something in which no one should 
engage any more than the practices of our 
Provincial and Dominion Parliaments are 
proof that representative institutions are 
unsuited as governing factors. 

The fault is not with the representative 
institutions, it is with the people. 

Whatever system we have it will only be 
a reflection of those who create it. 

If we are to have a businesslike Parlia- 
ment, be it Federal or Provincial, it follows 
that we must have therein a predomination 
of men possessing business commonsense. 

Like begets like. And if you have a 
Parliament in which the professional 
politician predominates, you cannot expect 
laws any other than those of the professional 
politician type. Sparrows do not produce 
eagles. 

In politics we leave to the party machine, 
whose component parts are professional 
politicians, to grind out our respective 
candidates. When they are placed before 
us we make obeisance to them, magnify 
their qualities and belittle the qualities of 
their opponents, whether they be worthy or 
unworthy thereof. And when we have 
elected them and they begin to produce 
laws after their kind we either blame the 
other party or declare representative govern- 
ment a farce. 

We seldom recognize the cause of the 
' disease and apply the remedy. 

If we are to have a businesslike Parlia- 
ment we must have businesslike represent- 
atives, and if we are to have businesslike 
representatives the business men of the 
country must put into practice the same 
methods they employ when appointing men 
to positions in their warehouses, stores or 
factories. 



THE IRON TRADE SITUATION. 

THE general tendency of the iron mar- 
ket is still downward, but it cannot 
be said that the situation is any worse. 

There are certain diseases in which it is 
necessary that certain stages shall be passed 
through before health is again restored. 
This is much the feeling that obtains in 
regard to the iron trade situation. 

There is a general belief among those 
who are watching the trend of affairs that 
prices must depreciate still further before 
people who are now holding off will buy. 
And, when that point is reached, we may 
naturally look for a hardening in values. 

At present, quotations on pig iron are 
practically nominal. Foundrymen in Can- 
ada inform Hardware and Metal that 
while they are ordinarily quoted $19 per 
ton for No. 1 foundry iron, either United 
States or domestic make, they could readily 
buy at lower figures. As it is they are not 
buying, but are working on old stocks. It 
is true meltings are not large at present, 
and they are smaller than they otherwise 
would be, several large moulding shops 
having been closed down this week owing 
to the unusually excessive heat. 

What the foundrymen in Canada are 
waiting for is $15 iron, and when they can 
buy at that figure an active demand may be 
expected from them. 

In the United States there have been 
larger transactions in pig iron than for some 
time. From Pittsburg comes the report of 
one sale of 10,000 tons of malleable Besse- 
mer for future delivery. The Iron Trade 
Review of August 9, in regard to pig iron, 
says : 

"Only six furnaces producing Bessemer 
iron, including those of steel companies, are 
now active in the valleys, and it is believed 
that by the latter part of the month this 
figure will nearly represent the furnaces in 
blast on any kind of iron, out of 29 in the 
Mahoning and Shenango valleys. It is the 
low level of prices that is telling on pig iron 
production. Stocks continue to accumulate 
and with few exceptions buyers of foundry 
iron hold off with their contracts, evidently 
in the hope that furnacemen will duplicate 
the recent sensational performances of the 



manufacturers of finished steel. It is hardly 
probable that further efforts will be made 
toward any concerted limitation of pig iron 
output. As prices fall business will stop ; 
and while no considerable business has been 
done at the prices now being quoted 
judged, from the inquiries received from 
large buyers of foundry iron and from the 
growing volume of small lot orders, that 
consumption is at a rate that would make a 
materially lower basis shortlived. The few 
concerns that have bought foundry iron in 
good lots expect to use as much iron as in 
the preceding year." 

How possible it is that the price of pig 
iron will stiffen when the demand increases 
may be gathered from the experience in 
regard to plates and bars in the United 
States market. When consumers considered 
that prices had depreciated to a point where 
profits had been wiped out, they bought, 
and that freely. This has resulted in the 
mills taking a firmer stand and marking 
their prices up $2 to $4. per ton. Even with 
the higher figures it is said prices on bars 
and plates are down to an export basis ; in 
fact, several deals are already said to be 
under negotiation. 

The metal trade generally, in Canada, is 
quiet. Prices are, however, fairly steady, 
although the jobbers are shading prices on 
galvanized sheets for large lots, in order to 
try and induce business. For small lots, 
they are less inclined to shade prices. 



IRON PIPE PRICES NOT YET FIXED. 

The movement referred to in last week's 
issue, having for its object the fixing of 
prices on iron pipe, has not yet succeeded 
in carrying its object, the meeting called for 
Friday last not having been held. 

The jobbers are, however, unanimous in 
the opinion that the movement will ultimately 
be successful. 

Perhaps on the strength of this expecta- 
tion, there is already less cutting in prices. 
In fact, it appears to have practically 
ceased. 



Don't underestimate the value of keeping 
the window glass and woodwork absolutely 
clean. The woodwork should have an 
occasional oiling. The recess between the 
windows should also receive a large share 
of attention. There is nothing inviting in 
uncleanliness anywhere, and neatness about 
a show window is more than a virtue — it is 
a necessity. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MAKE YOUR EMPLOYER'S BUSINESS YOUR OWN. 

BY J. H. DIETZ. 



PLUNGING immediately into the sub- 
ject, to benefit your employer you 
must sell goods ; to sell goods you 
must have customers ; to have customers, 
you must get them, and, what is more, keep 
them. If you are in the advertising depart- 
ment you may think you are an important 
factor in the getting of customers, but if you 
are behind the counter you must know that 
you are. 

To benefit your employer in this direction 
you must cultivate those qualities of person 
that will draw people to you. This may 
seem a hard and uncertain task, but re- 
member that attractive personalities are 
grown by the activity of life, not the accident 
of birth. You must 

GREET YOUR CUSTOMERS 

with a cordiality that shows your personal 
interest in them, and the peculiarities, 
limitations, or possibilities of every individual 
make them worthy your study, interest, and 
acquaintance. You must " size them up," 
know the things that interest them, and talk 
of those. Here comes in the value of ex- 
perience. You must have acquaintance 
with farming, the trades, labor in cities, the 
professions, political parties, social sects, 
religious denominations, scociety of all 
castes, from the Frenchman's demi-monde 
to the German's uberwelt. Through all of 
these do you reach people, and draw them 
to you. Part of this knowledge can be 
obtained from books and the daily news- 
paper, but if acquaintance with these 
different classes of people has been 
gained by actual association with them in 
their daily life, you are in possession of 

A VALUABLE HANDICAP 

in the race to benefit your employer. 
When you learn to forget yourself and talk 
to people of what interests them, instead of 
telling your own troubles and successes, 
you will have found the secret of drawing 
people to you. 

The next thing is to never let slip an op- 
portunity of extending this study. In the 
lulls of business, engage your customers in 
conversation concerning themselves and 
their interests. On the street car at the 
dinner table, everywhere you meet people 
whom you pass in silence, that with a little 
adroit study and tact, can be drawn into a 
conversation ; and with the sympathy of 
your acquaintance they will seek you in pur- 
chasing. 

DON'T BE EXCLUSIVE 

or ' ' swell ' ' in your associations either in 
or out of business hours. Meet everybody 
with the same cheery welcome, and, with 
practice, you will find that even the surly 



old stock exchange aristocrat behind his 
paper in the corner, suffering from gout and 
corns, cannot resist the pleasure of your 
sympathy. Knowing you he will naturally 
inquire who and what you are and drift to 
you in business. 

You want practical helps in attaining this 
tact ? To get the right frame of mind read 
Emerson and then study the people. Con- 
tinually forget yourself and speculate on the 
condition of the mind, aspirations, and 
"hobbies" of those about you. You must 
be the master of a thousand hobbies, and 
careful observation will secure you this. 
Never miss an opportunity of forming an 
acquaintance and exchanging cards or 
names, even though it be a street-sweeper 
of the gutter or a coal-stoker of an excursion 
boat, met during your outing. Take an 
interest in all people and they'll take an 
interest in you. Know their needs and 
they'll want you to supply them. 

TO KEEP THE CUSTOMER 

is the really important part of your business. 
Do this, but do not leave what goes before 
undone. Your object is not to sell goods, 
but to keep your customer. The loss of 
one sale for not having something wanted is 
not to becompared with the loss of a customer 
by substituting something not wanted. You 
must know also the policy of your employer 
in dealing with the public and be firm in 
that policy. If it is "no credit," don't 
offer any encouragement to credit ; if it is, 
"sell at market price," don't make little 
concessions to your friends. The public 
will find you out and it requires impartiality 
of a business institution as severely as of its 
public officials. Be sure your customer 
knows what he is getting. If he insists on 
buying a cheaper article tell him what its 
qualities are and after he has paid for it add 
a few more disparaging remarks : then if it 
is of no account he will not be dissatisfied, 
but will know the wisdom of buying a good 
article. Otherwise he will have gained the 
wisdom, but he'll go somewhere else to buy 
the article. When a boy, I bought a blue 
serge coat for $4, and the salesman never 
said a word about it except the price. I 
thought I was getting a nice, silky serge 
that would wear, and although I got my 
money's worth I never went there again. 
After a determination to have and keep a 
good understanding with your customer, 
comes, lastly, the most important of all, the 
selling. 

THE POWER OF KNOWLEDGE 

In this, as nowhere else in the world, 
knowledge is power. The majority of your 
customers do not know what they want and 



you must find out for them. They tell you 
their needs and you must know their goods. 
It is not enough that you know what you 
have in the house and its price. You must 
know all the uses that can be made of it, 
and also as much about its origin, if possible, 
as the man who made it. Never miss an 
opportunity to visit a manufactory of any 
kind, and go with your mouth and eyes opfca- - 
— asking questions and seeing. Study 
books on staple products. 

If you look along the shelves of your 
general store you will find materials, the 
source of which will take your 

SPARE TIME IN STUDY 

for the next twenty years. Their uses would 
occupy you nearly as long. All this comes 
after you know your stock thoroughly. How 
many know that ? Not all ; if you did you 
wouldn't leave that box of last year's lawns 
to spoil in the cellar while you sell from the 
latest styles that would find good sale later 
in the season or even next year. The best 
way to benefit your employer is to be alive 
to the possibilities of your occupation. 
When you have mastered the technicalities 
connected with commercial exchanges you 
are worth more to the world than any col- 
lege graduate on the eve of any commence- 
ment. 

WATCH YOUR CUSTOMER 

closely and know when you have made a 
sale. Perhaps you pass by sales unnoticed. 
Don't give him an opportunity to say "No!" 
but ask him (at the right moment always), 
' ' Now, which of these do you prefer ? " or, 
"What else today?" The blunt, "Do 
you want this ? ' ' has lost many a sale. 

In keeping and arranging stock never 
take orders from your employer — always 
anticipate them — you are among the stock 
more than he and ought to know its needs 
better. Don't let him ask you to do any- 
thing if you can help it. Be ahead of him 
and have the thing done. If you are what 
you ought to be after five years in the busi- 
ness you know more about it than he does, 
any way. He knows it. But don't let 
him know that you know it. When you 
come down in the morning just imagine you 
own the whole institution and then you'll do 
the things that best promote the interests of 
your employer. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 

Prompt Shipment! 






The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE 



G 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

EORGE WILSON & CO., lumber- 
men and planing-millers, St. Cath- 
arines, Ont., have compromised. 
The creditors of Magor Bros. & Co., 
roofers, Montreal, met on August 10. 

Richard Francis, harnessmaker, Douglas, 
>./nt., has assigned to Robt. C. McNab. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

E. Purvis & Co., general merchants, 
Slocan, B.C., have dissolved. 

E. Bourque & Co., tinsmiths, Plessisville, 
Que., have registered partnership. 

Woodhouse & McDiarmid, manufac- 
turers' agents, Montreal, have dissolved. 

O. H. Camirand & Cie. , sawmillers, 
Granby, Que., have formed a partnership. 

Leduc & Duquette, St. Hyacinthe, Que., 
have formed a partnership as roofers, etc. 

Snider & Echlin, general merchants, 
Keewatin, Ont., have dissolved, W. H. 
Echlin continuing. 

Johnston & Foss, hardware and grocery 
merchants, Sheibrooke, Que., have dis- 
solved. Mr. Foss has formed a partnership 
with Mr. Kerr to carry on the hardware 
business. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

W. B. Lees, general merchant, Grand 
Forks, B.C., has sold out. 

Wm. Appel, harness dealer, Milverton, 
Ont., has sold out to S. Rumford. 

Robert Stevenson, harness dealer, Glen- 
coe, Ont., advertises his business for sale. 

The stock of R. S. Fisher, general mer- 
chant, Dauphin, Man., was sold at 653^. 
on the dollar. 

The stock of Thomas Burnside, general 
merchant, Both well, Ont., was sold by 
auction on August 8. 

Hunter Bros., general merchants, San- 
don, B.C., have sold out to The Hunter, 
Kendrick Co., Limited. 

The stock of the estate of Carley & 
Studer, general merchants, Morden, Man., 
was sold to T. E. McGin at 70c. on the 
dollar. 

CHANGES. 

A. Siddle is commencing business as 
blacksmith at Strathburn, Ont. 

John Davison Paxton has registered as 
proprietor of the Davison Oil Co., Montreal. 

W. A. White, carriagemaker, Morden, 
Man., has been succeeded by H. Baldwin. 

Cowan & Co. , machinery manufacturers, 
Gait, Ont., have opened a branch in 
Montreal. 

Wm. Smith, harnessmaker, Niagara 
Falls, Ont., has been succeeded by C. 
Bradford. 

FIRES. 

Thomas Seaman, carriagemaker, Listowel, 
Ont., has been burned out ; insured. 



^a/\A 



ft 



Works 
Both Ways 

It you work for 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

it will work for you. It will make money and repu- 
tation for you. 

Poor paint on the other hand doesn't repay the 
time and trouble spent in pushing it. Worse than 
that, it injures you in a dozen ways. You can't 
sell much of it no matter how hard you push and 
the little you do sell spoils your chance for future 



trade. 


We know S. W. P. pays 


well for all the 


— ■> effort put into it 


because we're ^A 


\ . ■ ^L selling it ourselves 


c and growing ^^/i" 


■ * ^L all the time, J 



The Sherwin-Williams Co 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 




CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO. 



NEW YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



!'.( >STON. 
TORONTO. 



san Fi: \N( rsco. 

KANSAS CUV. 




Robt. E. Young, blacksmith, Listowel, 
Ont., was burned out ; insured. 

The stock of Jos. Grace, Montreal, was 
slightly damaged by fire and smoke. 

J. McDonald & Co., planing millers, etc., 
Chatham, N.B., have been burned out ; 
insurance, $3,000. 

DEATHS. 

A. McGregor, of A. McGregor & Son, 
hardware dealers, Victoria, B.C., is dead. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 

A & B write : We are looking around 
for a blank hardware price list bound. Can 
you refer us to any publishing company, or 
do you supply lists yourself ? 

[Remarks : We do not supply lists our- 
selves. Perhaps some of our readers can 
supply the desired information. — The 
Editor] 



ESTABLISHED IN MONTREAL. 

Cowan & Co., who for over 40 years have 
been well known machinists of Gait, <>nt., 
have opened an agency in Montreal, at 
302 304 St. James street, which will be under 
the management of Mr. W. H. Fisher, who 
has been with the company 17 years. They 
manufacture the celebrated Corliss engine, 
which has been almost entirely remodelled 
during the last few months. The firm also 
manufacture boilers and all kinds of wood- 
working machinery. Mr. James Cowan, 
the founder of the firm, who recently died 
aged 94, was well known throughout Canada 
as Dominion Arbitrator. 



OBLONG HUTTER MOULDS WANTED. 

I. & H. write: " Can you furnish us with 
the manufacturers' names of oblong butter 
moulds, 2 oz. prints in % inch squares. We 
have been asked to put in a stock." 

[Remarks : If any of our readers can 
supply the desired information we would 
consider it a favor. — The Editor.] 



The Town Council of Moose Jaw, N. W.T. , 
has passed a by-law for closing all stores, 
except drugs, tobacco, etc., by 6 o'clock 
every evening except Saturdays. A heavy 
penalty is imposed upon anyone breaking 
the law. 

Mr. Z. H. Burnham, an old and well- 
known hardwareman, is in charge of the 
hardware business of Mr. Wilbur Gordon, 
Tweed, Ont., during the latter' s absence at 
the Paris Exposition. 

Mr. Watt, accountant with Geo. D. Wood 
& Co., Winnipeg, is slowly convalescing 
from a very severe illness. Mr. Watt is a 
much valued employe, and the firm are 
anxiously awaiting his reiurn to business. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A LESSON FROM HISTORY. 

TWO young men were leaving their 
place of business just as their em- 
ployer's son drove by in an elegant 
turnout, the young man himself looking 
precisely as if he had sat for one of Nast's 
caricatures, writes Mrs. McConaughy in an 
exchange. 

'• How would it seem for us to be riding 
around in that style, Joe, with all the money 
we wished to spend, and no care as to 
where it came from. And just look how 
hard we work 10 hours a day, and for how 
little." 

Joe watched the retreating figure with 
laughing eyes as he replied : 

" It is exactly such specimens that make 
me contented with my working lot. If that 
is the best outcome of great wealth and 
luxury, let us stick to our brown bread and 
oatmeal. That chronic seasick look does 
not seem to argue even great enjoyment for 
him. If to be a millionaire's sons we must 
turn out dudes, let us be thankful for honest, 
hard-working fathers. 

' ' I have been reading history a good deal 
this winter, and took quite an interest in it. 
The nations all began down on a very low 
plane. First barbaric, and little by little 
rising in civilization, then increasing in 
wealth and luxury and weakness and 
wickedness, and then came the decline and 
downfall. That was the way with Greece, 
once so brave and powerful; and Rome ran 
the same course. The old history repeats 
itself among the nations of the earth, over 
and over again. I can't help wondering 
sometimes what may possibly be in store for 
this nation yet, it has reached such a stage 
of luxury and extravagance, and developed 
such a brainless race as the dudes. It 
looks as if it would take a pretty general 
cyclone to bring us back to a rational status 
again." 

"With your views I suppose you renounce 
all aspirations toward riches ? ' ' 

"Not much to renounce if you have 
reference to any prospects of that kind. Of 
course, I mean to get on and do the best I can 
for myself, but I am not going to mourn 
because I am not a millionaire and never 
shall be. I don't believe great luxury is the 
best thing for a man or his relations any 
more than it is for nations, which are only 
men in the mass." 

"Still it would be a good thing to have 
enough to live on, even if we must work 
hard for it. ' ' 

' ' 1 manage to make out some way, and 
don't find myself specially pinched." 

"That's where you differ from me, and 
yet you get no more wages. ' ' 

" I suppose the difference lies in the way 
we spend. I never spend mine until I get 
it. I can make it hold out so much better 



then. It always looks a good deal larger 
in prospect than it does in hand, so I am 
obliged to portion it out accordingly. Still, 
I always manage to leave a dollar over, to 
feel rich on. It is such a help to self-respect 
and comfort." 



MICA AXLE GREASE. 

Mica axle grease is being put upon the 
market by The Queen City Oil Co., Limited. 
It is put up in i -lb. and 3 lb. handsome 
white enameled tin boxes, and in 10, 15 and 
2 5 -lb. pails. 



-•■ 



Why don't you 



add firearms to your other lines ? Many hardware 
dealers carry guns and revolvers profitably. 



IVER JOHNSON 



GUNS -° REVOLVERS 

ARE 

. . SAFE . . 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE, PRICE LIST, ETC. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



Branches New York 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 304 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



9—- 



Gilbertson's Galvanized Sheets 



■••* 



PATENT 




FLATTENED 



are suitable for all kinds of Galvanized work demanding uniform quality ; being made 
of superior Siemens Steel, they will double seam either way of grain, are smooth, soft, and 
well galvanized, every sheet being carefully selected ; weight and count of sheets per case 
fully equal to the best known brands imported, and cost less. 

Gilbertson's are the only galvanizers who not only roll all their Steel Sheets, but 
manufacture all their own Steel in their own Steel Works, thus enabling them to put a 
soft and regular quality of steel into their sheets, which is impossible for galvanizers who buy 
their steel in the open market. 
GILBERTSON'S CORRUGATED GALVANIZED SHEETS-n sizes. 

"GILBERTSON'S" SIEMENS-MARTIN TINPLATES 

are soft, extra well coated, noted for deep stamping qualities, and for canners of fruits, meats, 
and fish have no equals. Cost no more than brands not nearly as well coated, or of equal quality. 



BRANDS: 



" Gilberton's," "Parsons," "Pontardawe," 

"Lincoln," "Comet," "Eegina," "Gwyned." 



GILBERTSON'S TERNEPLATES. " Regina" brand. 

IMITATION RUSSIA SHEETS— will not crack or scale. Pickled, cold rolled and 

close annealed. 
SIEMENS-MARTIN STEEL SHEETS, close annealed, close annealed and cold 

rolled (flat and free from buckles), also pickled. 
BLACK CEILING PLATES, " Comet " brand. Pickled, cold rolled and close annealed. 
BLACK TAGGER PLATES. Pickled and close annealed. 

Supplies carried by all wholesale jobbers. In ordering please mention brands. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, 



Agent 



13 St. John Street, MONTREAL. 



*—■ 



■—* 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 






37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 



ONLY 
HOLESALE. 




GUN CAPS. 



odd- 



U.M.C.C? 
WATERPROi 

w^PAPER SHOT SHL:L^J 

CLUB BRAND 




EMPTY PAPER SHELLS. 
BRASS SHELLS. 



GUN WADS. 



LOADED SHELLS. 







••'v 




• 6 •) V *«^ 



^^y\:»yn 1 



•v 



06 ^a*u 











38-55. 



30. 



SHOT SOFT AND CHILLED. 



Vfwr 



32-40. LEE-ENFIELD. 




"ECHO" CALL. 




'DUCK" CALL. 




UNIVERSAL" CALL. 



Letter Orders 
Promptly Filled. 



H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto. 



Our Prices 
Are Right. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"YANKEE" AUTOMATIC DRILL, NO. 41 

FOR carpenters, cabinetmakers, etc., 
for boring wood for various purposes, 
as setting screws, brads, nails, etc. 
Bores holes in hard or soft woods without 
splitting. Pushing handle down revolves 
the drill, and a spring pushes the handle 
back to its place. During the return move- 
ment the drill point revolves backward to 
clear chips, etc. 

This " Yankee " drill has the same style 
improvement over 
other drills in the mar- 
ket in its magazine, 
though it is somewhat 
different in its opera- 
tion than that in our 
No 40 "Yankee" drill. The magazine in 
this drill is opened by loosening nut at its 
lower end, causing interior oRhandle to 
move up and expose all the drill points in 
plain sight (as in illustration), thus enabling 
the user to quickly select and remove drill 
required. \ N 

The chuck is of new and improved de- 
sign, and will hold drill points tight and 
absolutely rigid, and an improvement on 



it. Here and there throughout the book 
glimpses of the immense plant and works 
of the steel companies located there, are 
shown. The engravings are well executed 
and, printed on the best paper, make the 
book an exceptionally fine production. 



NEVER SAY DIE. 

What is more soul stirring than to see a 
man who, beaten on every side, crowded 
into a corner, fights heroically to recover 




lost ground ? Him who, when his legs fail 
him, lights on his knees. Him, who ex- 
emplifies the old Norse maxim : " Either I 
will find a way or make one." It has 
been well said that "success consists not 
in never falling, but in rising every time we^ 
fall." Push on. Friends may desert, the 
clouds of doubt and discouragement, of 
sorrow and despair, may hover around^ 
about, but there is no night without its 



AT LAST SHE SMILED AND SPOKE. 

"Anything wrong?" asked the hotel 
clerk of the New York drummer who had 
just got home from the West. 

" I was thinking," was the reply. " I 
rode from Toledo to Buffalo with the 
prettiest girl I ever saw." 

"But that didn't hurt you. Who was 
she ?" fr » * 

"Can't tell." 

"You didn't introduce yourself and get 
her card in return ?" 

"No." 

' ' No particular trouble, eh ?' ' solicitously 
insisted the clerk. 

"Well, it was this way," replied the 
raveler, as he braced up for the explana- 
tion. " She simply ignored me and gazed 
out of the window. Then I rose and handed 
her a magazine, but she declined with 
thanks. Ten minutes later I bought her 
latest novel out, but she said she didn't care 
ify r^ad. Then I bought some fruit, but she 
would accept none. She also ignored me 
when I tried to draw her out on music." 

" But you persisted ?" 




chuck used on our No. 40 " Yankee " 
drill. 

The tool is nickel - plated and finely 
finished. The material and workmanship 
throughout are of the best. 

Eight drill points are furnished with each 
tool, one each 1 16, 5 64, 3 32, 7-64, y%, 
964, 5 32, 11-64 inch, shown full size in 
cut. They are same as used in No. 40 
"Yankee" drill. 

The entire length of tool, inclusive of 
drill, as in illustration, is 1 1 y% inches. 
Packed one in strong paper box. The 
North Bros. Manufacturing Co.. Phila- 
delphia, Pa., are the makers. 



morn, no lane without a turn. The world 
wants men ; it is bound to recognize him 
who knows not how to yield. Gain strength 
from the words of that Spartan mother, 
uttered when her son complained that his 
sword was too short. "Add a step to it," 
the brave woman replied. Never envy 
those who have not, figuratively speaking, 
been obliged to take in their light sails to 



AMERICAN SHEET STEEL CO., ETC. 

Vandergrift, Its Homes and Industries," 
is the name of a handsome book published 
for the Vandergrift Land and Improvement 
Company and illustrating and describing 
the town of that name, "the home of the 
Vandergrilt works of the American Sheet 
Steel Company, the Chilled Roll Foundry 
and the Vandergrift Lumber, Company." 
The book is gotten up in the best style pos- 
sible, with covers of dark, heavy paper, the 
lettering and design being in silver and 
black. Half-tones of residences, factories, 
scenery, public buildings, etc., in and about 
the town are found on every alternate page, 
a reference to each being printed opposite 




"Oh, yes. That is, I was about to make 
another attempt to enter into conversation 
when the train came to a halt at a town, 
and the girl beckoned me over. I was 
there in an. instant, and with the sweetest 
smite, you ever saw she asked me if I would 
do her'a. slight favor." 

" With dl my heart," I hastened to say. 
■ " '"Well,' she said smiling even more 
sweetly, ' suppose you leave the train here 
and take the next one that follows, for you 
have made me dead tired, and I feel like 
taking a nap.' " 

' ' Good gracious, ' ' whispered the clefk. 

"Yes, sir," said the drummer, as he 
reached for a cigar, ' ' and I want to go up 
to my room and sit and think and try and 
figure it out. Perhaps it's time I left the 
road and settled down at home." 



weather a squall. If you have been crippled, 
hasten to repair the damage and fall into 
line again. You are better for the experi- 
ence. Don't be troubled if some people 
think you are not as strong as before. 
Bide your time and measure swords with 
them. — Vanity Fair. 



A CHANGE IN A HARDWARE FIRM. 

The hardware business of T. Kenrick & 
Co., Fort William, Ont., has been taken over 
by W. A. Mackenrot & Co., and is being 
conducted under the latter style and name. 
Mr. W. A. Mackenrot was formerly the 
senior partner in the firm of Kenrick & Co. 



Cossitt Bros. & Co., Brockville, Ont., 
manufacturers of agricultural implements, 
have announced that they are doubtful 
about rebuilding in that town, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





Wmjfwtfxl ^^ ^\ Manufacturers, 

Ira 11 Y L- II -Importers itj 

hp^GpsMOifteQ.hQl Fuller 
'ALPcAjI /BENT £REE UFJ 




PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Robert Munro, managing-director of 
ie Canada Paint Co., accompanied his 
son to Victoria, B.C., last Thursday, and 
will return to Montreal next week. 

Mr. Newman, president of the Wholesale 
Hardware Association, is to be seen back 
at his desk in Caverhill, Learmont & Co.'s 
establishment, looking much better for his 
needed holiday. 

Mr. W. G. Johnson, hardware merchant, 
Rat Portage. Ont.. who has been for some 
months in Fort Frances, Ont., founding a 
branch of his business there, has returned 
to the former place. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by TH K 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY, 
Montreal 



. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 






Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Portland 
Cements 



-~~ BEST BRANDS. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Drain Pipes, 
Calcined Plaster, 

and a full stock of 

Builders' and Contractors' Supplies. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

W. McNally & Co. 

MONTREAL. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER AND CUi> 




D. 8. Patent June 25th, 1895. 
Canadian Pat. Dec. 13th, 1894. 



Sold by Jobbers of - - - 

HARDWARE 
TINWARE 
and STOVES, 

for furnace pipe, to support 
the sheet steel blade. 







ManilfartlirpH h\l THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
IVIdllUldUlUI CU UV A . R . v/OODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



Hardwood CHARCOAL 
WOOD ALCOHOL 



in Bulk or Sacks. 



equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 



Manufactured only by.. 



THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., 



Limited 



C, ,-.„,;... / Fenelon Falls. 
Factor.es | Deseronto 



Gooderham Building, TORONTO 



HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 




WORCESTER, MASS., U. S. A. 



Makers of- 



REVOLVERS 



High Grade 

SEND FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE. 

For sale by Sporting Goods and 
Hardware Stores almost everywhere. 



NOTICE TO IRON BRIDGE BUILDERS. 

CEALED TENDERS addressed lo the undersigned and 
*-* endorsed " Tender for iron work of bridges over the 
slide channels, Ottawa," will be received at this office 
until Thursday, August 16 next, for the reconstruction of 
the iron work of the bridges across the Chaudiere slide 
channels of the Ottawa Kiver, in the City of Ottawa, 
which was destroyed by fire in April last, according to 
plans and a specification which can be seen at the office of 
the Superintending Engineer of the Ottawa River Works, 
over the Post Office in the city of Ottawa, and at the 
Department of Public Works, Ottawa, after Wednesday, 
August i next. 

Tenders will not he considered unless made in the 
manner called for by the specification and signed by the 
actual signature of the tenderer. 

An accepted chartered bank cheque, payable to the 
order of the Minister of Public Works, and equal to to per 
cent, of the bulk amount of the lender, must accompany 
each lender. The cheque wi 1 be forfeited if the paity 
decline to contract or fail to complete the work contracted 
for. It will be returned in case of non-acceptance of 
tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order, 

JOSEPH R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa, July 30, 1900. 

N.B.— Newspapers inserting thi» advertisement without 
authority from the Department, will not be paid for it. 132) 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England. 

Manufacturers of___a^4l% 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations oan ba had from 

Canadian Office : 

ft St. Saeramant St., • MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, August 10, 1900. 
HARDWARE. 

THE nervousness that put a damper on 
the trade of last month has disap- 
peared, and the dealers throughout 
the country are showing more confidence in 
the market as it is at present constituted. 
Consequently, trade is opening up, and par- 
ticularly during the last 10 days. One can 
hardly single out any one line as being 
active, for both heavy and shelf goods are 
moving decidedly freely. Some of the 
largest orders of cutlery that have left Mont- 
real warehouses for some years were shipped 
this week. Sporting goods are selling 
rapidly. The havest tool trade is falling off 
and getting out of season. Such things as 
bolts, screws and rivets are being sold in 
large quantities, and people are now laying 
in fall stocks of nails, although in connec- 
tion with this latter line there is still some 
hesitation. 

Barb Wire — Inquiry is improving. We 
quote the base at $3.30 f.o.b. Montreal in 
less than carlots. . 



Galvanized Wire — Trade in this line 
is still slack. We quote as follows: Nos. 
6, 7, and 8 guage, $3.95 ; No. 9, S3-2o; 
No. 10, $4.10; No. 11, $4. 15; No. 12, $3. 35; 
No. 13, $3.45 ; No. 14, $4-5°'. No - I 5. $s ; 
and No. 16, $5.25, for small quantities. 

Smooth Wire — Little movemet is to be 
noticed. The price is on a S3 per 100-lb. 
base. 

Fine Steel Wire — Trade in this line is 
picking up somewhat, but the volume is not 
large. The discount is 1 5 per cent, off list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — There is not 
much doing. Discounts are 55 and 2^ 
per cent, on brass, and 50 and 2*4 pc 
cent, on copper. 

Fence Staples — A large number of 
inquiries have come in this week. The 
price is #3 45 per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The volume of business in 
wire nails is increasing. Dealers are seem- 
ingly convinced that the price has been set 
for the season. We quote S3. 10 for small 
lots and S3 for carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and St. John, 
N.B. 



Cut Nails — In this line business is also 
opening up and showing signs of activity. 
We quote $2.60 for small and $2.50 for, 
carlots. Flour barrel nails, 25 per cent, 
discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per cent, dis- 
count. 

Horse Nails — Trade is a little better 
this week. The discount is 50 per cent, on 
Standard and 50 and 10 per cent, on 
Acadia. 

Horseshoes — The amount of business 
done in horseshoes this week has been 
much larger than for some weeks past. 
We quote : Iron shoes, light and medium 
pattern, No. 2 and larger, S3. 65 ; No. 1 
and smaller, S3- 90 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, S3- 9° ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.15 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, S3. 85 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
S4 10 ; feather-weight, all sizes, S5-io; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, S6.20 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, ioc. extra. 

Screws — A good trade in screws is being 
done this week, each order coming in con- 
taining an inquiry for this line. Dis- 




A NEW FURNACE 



1 



ROUGH WOOD 

For any kind of Fuel ( J"™!* 000 

(soft coal 

Made in three sizes, with capacities ranging from 10,000 
to 50,000 cubic feet. The most modern and powerful 
heater of its kind made in the Dominion. 

They have larger heating surfaces than any other, 
and have . . . 

Heavy sectional firepot, 

Triangular grates, 

Double fire door, size II x 15 in. 

Direct or indirect draft. 

Safety gas damper, 

Steel plate dome and radiator. 

They are easily set up, and cased. 

A HIGH-GLASS FURNACE AT A LOW PRICE 

Descriptive matter will be mailed to Agents 
in a few days. 

THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, 

WINNIPEG, or VANCOUVER. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 

New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 

Black and Galvanized 

f W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Planished I on 

Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 

H. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

■6 St Sulplce Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

3, Wellington street, MONTREAL 

WHY SO MANY ADOPT 




BENNETT'S SHELF BOX. 

They display goeds, attract customers, make sales, 
save room, keep stock in order, and help to serve cus- 
tomers quickly — all elements to success. Put them in 
now and get ready for the Fall trade. Prices and 
particulars from the patentee and maker, 

J. S. BENNETT, 



20 Sheridan Ave. ' TORONTO 

N.B. — Boxe) mule to fit your present shelving. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



counts are as follows : Flat head bright, 8 
per cent, off list ; round head bright, 75 
per cent. ; flat head brass, 75 percent.; 
round head brass, 67 '4 per cent.; flat head 
bronze, 67^ percent.; round head bronze, 
62 \4 per cent. 

Bolts — Some fair shipments have been 
made this week owing doubtless to the fix- 
ing of the prices, which have been easy 
for some time. Discounts are : 5-16 
and under, 60 per cent.; y% and larger, 
55 per cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 60 
per cent. ; coach screws, 70 per cent. ; sleigh 
shoe bolts, 75 per cent.; square nuts, 4c. 
per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4^c. per lb. 
off list ; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; blank bolts, 
60 per cent.; plough bolts, 55 per cent.; 
Norway bolts, square, 65 per cent. ; tire 
bolts, 60 percent.; stove bolts, 60 and 10 
per cent. 

Rivets — This line shares in the activity 
of the week. We quote discounts : 
Best iron rivets, section, cairiage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
50 per cent, off; swedes iron burrs, 45 per 
cent, off; copper rivets, 35 per cent.; 
coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5 -lb. 
carton boxes, 50 per cent. off. 

Cordage — Binder twine is asked for this 
week, but other lines are only in moderate 
request. The base prices are unchanged 
at 14c. for manila, and 9-1, c. for sisal. 

Spades and Shovels — An improvement 
is also noticeable in these lines. The dis- 
counts continue at 40 and 5 per cent. 

Tacks — A fair summer trade is being 
done in tacks. Merely as base prices we 
quote : Carpet tacks in dozens and bulk, 
blued, 80 and 5 per cent, discount ; tinned, 
80 and 10 per cent.; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens, 75 and 15 per cent, discount. 

Firebricks — The demand is moderate. 
We quote $17 to $24 per 1,000 as to brand. 

Cement — The market in cements is firm 
and the demand good. Prices remain un- 
changed. We quote : German, 5 2. 40 to 
52.60; English, 52.30 to 52.40 ; Belgian, 
51 .80 to 52.10. 

METALS. 

The metal market has not improved very 
appreciably. The orders for small lots are 
perhaps more numerous this week, but the 
demand for large lots is still conspicuous by 
its absence. The London market in pig tin 
has advanced almost £2 in London since 
last week. The market for lead and its 
compounds is also decidedly firm. The iron 
market, particularly in England, is easier. 

Pig Iron — Business in this line is very 
dull. A few transactions have taken place 
at about our last week's quotation, 524.50. 

Bar Iron — Small lots are being sold 
freely to dealers at outside points. The 



TINPLATES 

"LYDBROOK," "TRYM," 
"GRAFTON," "ALLAWAYS," 
"CANADA CfcOWN," ETC. 

CANADA PLATES 

" DOMINION CROWN " All Poliihed. 
" ALLAWAYS " best Half Bright. 
"PONTYPOOL" Half Bright. 
"DOMINION CROWN" Galvanized. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 



MONTREAL. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We have in stock 

IC and IX 14x20 and 

20x28 Tinplates 
Cokes and Charcoals. 

Especially low 
figures on IX 14 x 20. 

Nova Scotia Steel Co. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



An Opposition 
Traveller 

said to one of our representatives a 
few days ago that "You people make, 
me tired the way you blow about 
that Elastilite Varnish." 

Poor Fellow ! No wonder he was tired ! Elas- 
tilite has taken his customers and he has to work 
hard to get orders. 

Elastilite is a Varnish for either inside or 
outside that you can sell over and over again to 
your customers. Once used they always ask for it 
and tell their friends how nice it looks and how 
well it wears. 



-Manufactured only by- 



IL e Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



'. 



We have received large consignments of 




ass 



Both Single and Double 

via the following steamers, viz 

CEBRIANA, 

FITZCLARENCE, DALTONHEAD, 

CAMBRIAN KING, SYLVANIA, 

and from our large and complete stock can fill all orders 
promptly. 



price is $2.15 to $2.20 per 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Black Sheets — There is nothing new in 
black sheets. We quote the base on 8 to 16 
gauge at $2.95. 

Galvanized Iron — Some little interest 
is shown. We quote : No. 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.75 to $5.00, and Comet, No. 28, 
54.40 to $4-65. 

Ingot Copper — The market is firm and 
unchanged. We still quote i7j£c. 

Ingot Tin — On the London market tin 
has advanced £z this week, and stocks are 
still firmly held. The article can be bought 
here at 37c, although some ask 38c. 
Stocks are low. 

Lead — Outside quotations continue firm. 
We quote the base at $4.65. Agents here 
have received instructions not to sell stocks 
at old figures without confirmation from 
headquarters, as an advance is probable at 
any moment. 

Lead Pipe — There is not much doing in 
lead pipe. We quote : 7c. for ordinary 
and 7J£c. for composition waste, with 15 
per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — Inquiry for iron pipe is fair 
at former prices. We quote : }(, $2.95 per 
100 ft.; ft. $2.95; #. $3.10; #, 53.45; 1, 
55. 20 ; itf , $6.71 1 i#. * 8 - IO > and 2 ' in -> 
5n 00, 



Tinplates — A better business has been 
done this week in tinplates. Prices are 
S4.50 for coke, and $4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — There has been no 
change in the prices for Canada plate this 
week, but the market is easy. We quote : 
52's, $3; 60' s, $3.05; 75's, 53.10; full 
polished, $3. 50/ and galvanized, 54.60. 

Terne Plate — There is nothing to note 
in connection with terne plate. Price re- 
mains as before at 58.50, 

Swedish Iron — Price is 54. 25. 

Coil Chain — The demand and market 
are steady. We quote : No. 6, 1 1 J^c. ; No. 
5, ioc. ; No. 4, 9J£c. ; No. 3, 9c; #-inch, 
7^c. per lb.; 5-16, 5485; #,54-8o; 7-16, 
54-5°: K. 14-25; 9-i6, 54-15 ! #• $3-8o; 
%> 53-75; H< $3-70, and 1 inch, 53-7o per 
100 lb. 

Sheet Zinc — Demand is fair at 6% to 
6^c. 

Antimony — Unchanged at ioj^c. 

GLASS. 

The glass market is decidedly firm. 
Dealers can rest assured that there will be 
no decline this winter, as foreign merchants 
have withdrawn quotations and stocks here 
are very low. We quote as follows : First 
break, 52 ; second, 52. 10 for 50 feet ; first 
break, 100 feet, 53-8o; second, 54 ; third, 
54.50 ; fourth, 54.75 ; fifth, 55.25 ; sixth, 
55.75, and seventh, 56.25. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

Business is quiet. The lead market con- 
tinues firm. There has been no change in 
lead pigments on the other side, but strong 
prices in pig lead would indicate that higher 
prices may be looked for. Turpentine is 
easier on the Southern market at the 
moment, but no change has taken place 
here, as the market in the South is of an 
unsteady character and liable to react at 
any moment, should a demand spring up. 
This condition is not at all unlikely to come 
about, for it is well known that dealers all 
over have been buying from hand to mouth. 
There are no changes in quotations to report 
this week. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 56.75 ; No. 1, 56. 37^ ; No. 2, 
56; No. 3, 55.62^, and No. 4, 55.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal, prompt cash. 

Dry White Lead — 55. 75 in casks; kegs, 
56. 

Red Lead — Casks, 55- 10; in kegs, 

$5-35 to 55-5°- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6Xc;in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7#c. 

Putty -We quote : Bulk, $1.95 ; blad- 
ders, in bbls., 52.10; bladders, in cases, 
52.25; in tins, 52.35 to 52.60. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 84c. ; boiled, 
87c, five to nine-barrels, ic. less, ten 
and twenty-barrel lots open, net cash, plus 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



2c. lor 4 months. Delivered anywhere in 
Ontario between Montreal and Oshawa at 
2c. per gallon advance and freight allowed. 

Turpentine— Single barrels, 67c; two to 
four barrels, 66c; five barrels and over, 
open terms, the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — $1.20 to 51.40 per 
gallon. 

Castor Oil— 83^ to g l /c. in whole- 
sale lots, and J^c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47^ to 49c. 

Cod Oil— 32X to 35c. 

Paris Green — Demand fair; 1 -lb- 
packets, I9^c, and drums, i8#c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
$2.75 to 54.50, as to brand; coal tar, 
$3.25 to $3.75 ; cotton waste, 4^ to 5^c. 
for colored, and 6 to 7>£c. for white 
oakum, 5^ to 6^c, and cotton oakum, 
10 to lie. 

PETROLEUM. 

A weaker feeling has prevailed in the 
petroleum market for Canadian rsfined, and 
prices have declined y z z. per gallon, but 
judging from the tone of the American 
market of late, an early reaction in the 
price of Canadian oil would be in order. 
American oil is firmly held, and prices for 
both crude and refined have a tendency to 
advance in the near future. The demand 
for all grades is fully up to expectations for 
the season, and the market, on the whole, 
is fairly active. We quote : ' ' Silver Star, 
15^ to i6#c; "Imperial Acme," \b%. 
to i7^c; "S C. Acme," 18 to 19c, and 
" Pratt's Astral," 19 to 20c. 
HIDES. 

The hide market is slow, owing to lack of 
demand from tanners who have an over- 
supply of leather. The usual monthly ad- 
vance of ioc. per skin in the price of 
lambskins has taken place, and dealers are 
now paying 40c. each. We quote : Beef 
hides, 8c. for No. 1 ; 7c. for No. 2, and 6c. 
for No. 3. Calfskins, 9c. for No. 1, and 
7c. for No. 2 ; lambskins, 40c. 



MARKET NOTES. 



Coal oil is }£c. lower. 

Lambskins are advanced ioc. a skin. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, August 10, :90c 

HARDWARE. 

THE trade situation in hardware has not 
changed materially during the past 
week. For this time of the year, a 
fair volume of business is being done. At the 
same time, the individual orders are light. 
Fence wires are still inactive. There has been 
a steady trade for small lots of wire nails. 
. ery little is being done in cut nails. 
Screws, bolts and nuts are still fairly active. 
Business is still falling off in harvest tools, 
although a fair business is still being done 
in some lines. Trade is fairly brisk in 
sporting goods, and a nice trade is being 
done in cutlery. Trade keeps steady in 
churns and ice cream freezers. There is 
not as much being done in enameled ware 
as there was, and tinware is decidedly quiet. 



The Popular Fireproof 
Roofing 

Eastlake 
Shingles 

GALVANIZED OR PAINTED 




Always give absolute satisfaction. 

Mot only fire and weather proof, but also lightning and rust proof. 

And quicker laid than others — their patent side lock gives them immense superiority. 

They are in great demand by practical builders everywhere — are you handling them ? 

Our catalogues and price list are at your service. 



METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited EllK" Toronto 



Wholesale Manufacturers. 



Shipments of stoves are this week being 
made by the manufacturers. There is quite 
a little being done in binder twine, although 
orders are only of a hand-to-mouth character. 
We have no change of any kind to no'e in 
prices. Payments are fair. 

Barb Wire — A few small orders are 
being received, but the volume of business 
is insignificant. We quote f.o.b. Cleveland 
#2. 95 in carlots, and $3.05 in less than 
carlots ; f.o.b. Toronto, $3.25 in less than 
carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — There are a few 
orders being received, but the quantities 
wanted are small. We quote as follows from 
Toronto : No. 5, $4.52^; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 
gauge, $3.85; No. 9, $3.10; No. 10, $4; No. 
II, $405; No. 12, S3. 25; No. 13, $3.35 ; 
No. 14, #4.40; No. 15, $5.10; No. 16, 
55. 15. The f o.b. price Cleveland for Nos. 
6 to 9 base is $2. 80 in less than carloads, 
and $2.70 for carloads. Terms are 60 days 
or 2 per cent. 10 days. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is practi- 
cally nothing doing in oiled and annealed 
wire. In hay-baling wire, some inquiries 
have been received during the week, but, 
as far as can be learned, they result in little 
or no business. The base price is S3 per 
100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Business is much about 
the same as it was a week ago, the demand 
only being for small lots. Base price 53 in 
carlots, and S3 10 in less quantities. 

Cut Nails — There are a few cut nails 
going out, but business in aggregate does 
not amount to much. The base price is $2.60 
per keg, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Belleville. 

Horseshoes — Business in this line re- 
mains much the same as before. Namely, 



quiet and unintetesting. We quote, f.o.b. 
Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, 
medium and heavy, $3 .75; snow shoes, $4; 
light steel shoes, S3 .95; featherweight (all 
sizes) 5520; iron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, 
light, medium and heavy (allsizes),$4; snow- 
shoes, $4.25 ; light steel shoes, $4 20 ; 
featherweight (all sizes), $5.20. 

Horse Nails — These are quiet and un- 
changed. Discount, 50 per cent, on stand- 
ard oval head, and 50 and 10 per cent, on 
Acadia. 

Screws — A fairly good trade is still 
being done in screws. We quote as fol- 
lows : Flat head bright, 80 per cent, off 
the list ; round head bright, 75 per cent.; 
flat head brass, 75 per cent.: round head 
brass, 67 # per cent.; flat head bronze, 
67 yi. per cent.; roundhead bronze, 62 }£ 
per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — A fair steady trade is 
still to be noted in bolts and nuts. We 
quote : Norway bolts, full, square, 65 
per cent. ; common carriage bolts, full 
square, 6j percent.; ditto, 5-15 and under, 
60 per cent.; ditto, y% and larger, 55 per 
cent. ; machine bolts, all sizes, 60 
per cent. ; coach screws, 70 per cent. ; 
sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; blank bolts, 
60 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
nuts, square, 4c. off ; nuts, hexagon, i,%z. 
off; tire bolts, 60 per cent.; stove bolts, 
60 and 10 per cent.; plough bolts, 55 per 
cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — Trade is just 
steady and without any striking features. We 
quote: Carriage section, wagon box, rivets, 
etc. 50 per cent. ; black M rivets. 50 per 
cent. ; iron burrs, 45 per cent.; copper 
rivets, 35 per cent. ; bifurcated with box, 
S-lb. carton boxes, 30c. per lb. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Enameled Ware — There is not as much 
doing as there was and trade is quiet. 

Tinware — The movement in tinware is 
decidedly small. 

Stoves — A good many orders have been 
taken for stoves for August delivery, and 
shipments of these are now going forward. 

Rope — There is a demand for sisal rope 
to be used in connection with hay forks, but 
in general, the rope trade is rather quiet. 
One feature of the trade is the shipments 
that some of the wholesale houses are this 
week sending forward to the Northwest. 
Wequote: Pure manila, 13^ to 14c; "A" 
quality manila, n}4 to 12c. ; special 
manila, ioj£ to 11c. ; sisal, 9^ to 10c. 

Binder Twine — The retail houses appear 
to be pretty well sold out, for they are buying 
small lots somewhat freely. We quote : 
Pure manila, i2^c. ; mixed, 9^c.;sisal, 9c. 

Harvest Tools — A few hay and manure 
forks, and, now and then, a cradle, are 
going out, but trade is gradually falling off. 
Discount, 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — In this line there 
is very little being done. Discount, 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Sporting Goods — Guns and ammunition 
are going out every day, and business in 
this line is fairly good. 

Cutlery — Business is principally in table 
cutlery, although a little is being done in 
pocket cutlery. A few butchers' knives 
and razors are also selling. 

Cement — The local trade continues in an 
improved condition. At outside points a brisk 
market prevails at steady prices. We quote 
in barrel lots : Canadian Portland, $2.80 
to $3 ; Belgian, $2.75 to $3; English do., 
$3; Canadian hydraulic cements, $1.25 to 
$1.50; calcined plaster, $1.90; asbestos 
cement, ^2.50 per bbl. 

Cow Chains — Although it is yet early in 
the season, an order now and then is being 
received for cow chains. 

Ice Cream Freezers — Quite a few 
orders are still being received for ice cream 
freezers. 

Churns — A fairly steady trade is still 
being done in churns. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Although 
trade in this line was thought to be over, a 
few orders have been received during the 
past week. 

METAL8. 

The metal trade is on the whole quiet 
this week, and the few orders that are being 
received are for immediate shipment. 
Quite a few inquiries have been heard, but 
they have not amounted to anything. 

Pig Iron. — The market is still weak, 
with foundrymen still holding off for lower 
prices. Quotations for Hamilton iron are 
$19 for No. 1 and $18.75 {or No. 2. 

Bar Iron — Trade is still quiet, and the 



ruling quotations are $2 in carlots and $2. 10 
in smaller quantities. 

Pig Tin — There has been rather a good 
business done in this line in small quan- 
tities. Local quotations are unchanged at 
36 to 37c. The London market declined 
£1 5s. on Thursday, and, in New York, 
spot stock was offered at 30 to 35 points 
lower than on the previous day. 

Tinplates — A moderate trade has been 
done in this line during the past week in 
small lots. The demand has been for both 
cokes and charcoals. 

Tinned Sheets — Trade in this line is 
quiet and featureless. 

Black Sheets — The demand keeps light 
and the base price is unchanged at $3.60. 

Galvanized Sheets — A fair trade is to 
be noted, and import orders continue to 
arrive. Although quotations are unchanged 
for ordinary lots, figures are being shaded 
on two and five-case lots, in order to try 
and induce business. Manufacturers' prices 
are unchanged, the lower quotations only 
being made by the wholesale trade. 

Canada Plates — There is very little 
movement in this line. Import orders are 
beginning to arrive. This is a little earlier 
than usual, but the orders were placed 
earlier by the jobbers with a view to secur- 
ing the supplies below the maximum figures 
which they expected would rule. To day's 
quotations, however, are lower than those at 
which they placed their orders. We quote : 
All-dull, $3.35 ; half-polished, $3.50, and 
all-bright, #4. 

Iron Pipe — The jobbers have not yet 
agreed upon a fixed price for iron pipe, but 
it is held to be only a matter of a short time 
before they will do so. Business is fairly 
good, and we hear of less cutting. Dis- 
counts are : Black, pipe, X t0 H inch, 40 
per cent. ; l / z inch, 60 per cent. ; ^ to 2 
inch, 66 % per cent. ; larger sizes, 50 and 5 
per cent. Galvanized pipe: }i inch, 40 per 
cent*. ; ^ to 2 inch, 50 per cent. 

Lead Pipe — Business keeps steady. We 
quote 7c. per lb., with discount 15 per 
cent., f.o.b. Toronto. 

Lead — Business in this line is quiet at 
5 to 5%c per lb. 

Solder — Business is fairly active. There 
is some difference in quotations, but the 
ruling prices are as follows ■ Half-and- 
half, 21^ to 22^c; refined, 21 to2ij£c, 
and wiping, 20 to 21c. 

Copper — Orders for ingot copper are 
small, but there is a fair movement in sheet 
copper. We quote igyi to 20c. for ingot, 
and 23. to 23j£c. for sheet copper. 

Zinc Spelter — Trade is quiet, and quo- 
tations unchanged at 7 to 7X C - P er ^°- 

Zinc Sheet — Business is quiet also in 
this line, and devoid of any special feature. 



[i A \l r If 'O The original and only Genuine Pre- 
II 11 l\ f I m\ paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
vfllVLI \J 6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, H.V. 

DERBY SNAP. 

Witt Plated Rust Proof 
and Guarded Spring. 

"THE LATEST AND BEST." 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS, 

' B^-oS -^S^Largert V»rierjr, 

Toilet, Band, Electric Fowei| 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sbeep -Shearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB OATALOOUZ TO 
«««rl«»« Shearer Mf*. Co., N»«bo«. K.H..C84 





NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer, 
They work silently and effectually, and Dever get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 



8URMAN & SONS', LIMITED 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Field Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Go, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

w|^ Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

On sale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



We quote 7c. for cask lots, and 7j£c. for 
part casks. 

Antimony — This keeps dull with prices 
unchanged at 11 to wy^c. for Cookson's. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There is considerable improvement in the 
oil market this week. The demand for 
castor oil and seal oil, at present, is brisk, 
'//quantity of linseed oil is moving, though 
prices remain as firm as before. There is 
a heavy movement in turpentine, people 
having been waiting until they thought 
bottom prices had been reached. A reduc- 
tion of 2c. has taken place in turpentine. 
Paris green is done for the season. We 
quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.87 % ; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2, $6. \z% 
No. 3, $?-7S; No. 4, $5 ; dry white lead is 
casks, 55.75. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $5.50 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75; 
No. 1, in casks of 560 lb. ,$5 to $5.25; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb., 55.25 to $5.50. 

Litharge and Orange Mineral — 
Litharge, 6 to 6^c. ; orange mineral, 8 
to 8#c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb.; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22j4c ; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Potty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.15 ; bulk, in bbls., 
$1.95 ; bulk, in less quantities, $2. 10. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per barrel. 

Paris Green — Petroleum, bbls., 18c. ; 
arsenic, kegs, i8#c. ; drums, 50 and 100 
lb. i8^c. ; drums, 25 lb., I9#c. ; tins, 1 
lb., 2o^c; tins, J^ lb. 22^c; packages, 1 
lb., i9^c. ; packages, % lb., 2i^c. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2. 50 per cwt. 
in barrels, and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less quan- 
tity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. in 
barrels. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, jSi.20 to 51.30 per 
gallon ; No 1 quality, Ji.oo per gallon. 

Seal Oil — 54c. per gallon, and yellow 
seal at 45c. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 
to ioj^c. per lb. and io}4 to 11c. for single 
ns. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
86c; boiled, 89c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 85c; 
boiled, 88c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, Guelph and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 67c. ; two 
to four barrels, 66c, delivered to outside 
points. Toronto, Hamilton, London, Sarnia, 
Walkerville, Chatham, Dresden, Wallace- 
burg and Amherstburg, 2c less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c per gallon extra 



84,000 Daily Production. 
S Factories. S Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sala all 
ovar tha World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70 , of Total Production of America 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled Chequered, and Rough Plate Glasn. 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " Nl ARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Si 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, eml. 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimate 

Designs on application. 

Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street. London, E.C.— 128 Hope Street, Glasgow - 
12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Paradise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glass. Bt. Helens.' Telephc 
68 St Helens. 



BROWN'S 



PATENT 

PATENT 



STEEL 

NO. 32840. 



WIRE CHAIN. 




'i^l JB-j. !■'■*> JB-0"B JP-i'W^HS-.vSi 



If you are interested in chains examine carefully the perfect mechanical construction of the Brown's. It is the most 
perfect chain made. We make it in ij sizes. We use it exclusively in all our Halter, Dog, Tie-out, Cattle, Trace 
Chains, etc. You will make no mistake in handling our line exclusively. 



THE B 



GREENING 

Hamilton 



WIRE CO., LIMITED 



and Montreal 



will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c, and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

A number of import orders are only arriv- 
ing now. on account of the situation in Bel- 
gium. The movement is not very heavy. We 
quote first break locally : Star, in 50-foot 
boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot boxes, $4.00; 
double diamond under 26 united inches, 
$6, Toronto Hamilton and London; terms 
4 months or 3 per cent., 30 days. 
PETROLEUM. 

The market is picking up as the evenings 
grow shorter, and this week there is a good 
trade doing. We quote: Pratt's Astral, 1 8c. 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; American 
water white, 18c. in barrels ; Photogene, 
ijy^c.\ Sarnia water white, 17c. in barrels; 
Sarnia prime white, 16c. in barrels. 
COAL. 

The market is still somewhat quiet. We 
quote for August shipments, for anthracite 
on cars at Buffalo and bridges as fol- 
lows : Nut, egg and stove, S4.50 per gross 
ton, or $4.01 per net ton ; grate, $4.25 
per gross ton, or S3. 79 per net ton. 



manufacturers of housefurnishing hardware 
and tool specialties, Newark, N.J. 

The new factory of The Ontario Silver 
Co., at Niagara Falls, Ont., is now in run- 
ning order. 

NEW HARDWARE STORE IN PERTH. 

Perth, Ont., is to have a new hardware 
firm. Its style will be Rogers & Nicoll, and 
it will have a brand new store as well as a 
brand new stock. The former is now in 
course of erection. It will be 29 feet wide 
by 120 feet deep, and will be up-to-date in 
every respect. Rogers & Nicoll expect to 
take possession about September 15. 

Mr. George W. Rogers is well known to 
the hardware trade. During the last 16 
years he has been in the employ of H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co., about half that time 
being spent on the road as one of the firm's 
travelers. 

Mr. N. B. Nicoll, the other member of 
the new firm, has been associated with 
James & Reid, hardware merchants, Perth, 
for several years, and like Mr. Rogers is 
well trained in the hardware trade. 

Both members of the firm are Perth boys. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Scrap rubber is %z. higher. 

Heavy copper is ic. higher. 

A decline of 2c. has taken place in tur- 
pentine. 

New light scrap copper has advanced 
%c. per lb. 

Mr. T. Mortimer, Toronto, has been 
appointed Ontario agent for Weiner & Co., 



AGAIN AT HIS DESK. 

Mr. T. G. Dexter, manager of H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co., is again back at his 
desk after a two weeks' trip to Muskoka and 
the upper lakes. He had a pleasant trip. 
One thing that impressed him was the quan- 
tity of package freight from factories in the 
Eastern States that is transhipped at Depot 
Harbor for the Western States and the 
quantity of grain from the webt that is 
transhipped for Montreal and the Eastern 
States. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW TO COLLECT OLD ACCOUNTS. 



By F. H. Hendryx. 



THE matter of collections is an art 
itself. One of my early employers 
used to say to we clerks, " Anyone 
can give goods away. Most anyone can 
sell goods on credit, but he is a smart one 
that sells and gets the money." This 
saying is particularly apt to the selling of 
goods on credit and getting pay for them 
afterwards. I know merchants who cannot 
collect a bill without making the customer 
sore on him. 

IT REQUIRES TACT, 

patience and perseverance to collect ac- 
counts. 

Just why customers, when they have 
been accommodated, will object to being 
asked to pay the account, has always been 
a stickler. They think nothing of asking 
the merchant to let them take his goods 
home without a payment of cash for them — 
in fact, they would consider it an insult if 
they were refused credit — and when the 
merchant asks for the pay they think — 
many do — that the merchant is heaping 
insult on insult. Just why this is so — why 
the " thusness of the whichness " — is too 
profound a subject to discuss here. 

As I said, it requires tact. No two per- 
sons can be approached in the same 
manner. I never went to a person with a 
bill but I 

STUDIED THE EFFECT 

on them. To the person who is good pay, 
but inclined to be a little touchy, I merely 
leave the statement with the remark, "I'll 
leave that with you," and walk away. With 
some of them I leave the bill without remark. 
With the person who will not pay until asked 
for it, then always feels hurt, and yet wants 
it to appear that he is making payment of 
his own will, I deal differently. I approach 
timidly, hesitate, and finally muster courage 
to hand the bill to him. Usually I say 
nothing. I wait for money or dismissal, 
and usually take money with me. 
Some people want to put everybody 

UNDER OBLIGATIONS 

to them. To such step up in a confidential 
manner, saying, " It will be a very great 
accommodation if you can give me the 
money on this to day. We have some bills 
to meet, and have put off asking you for 
this until it was absolutely necessary to 
have it." I always get that man's money. 
Some men are slow and never pay until 
obliged to. To such I present a bill with 
all the confidence I can muster and put to 
the front. They invariably take the bill, 
look at me as though to wither me with their 
glance, and then usually make a payment. 

*An essay, winner of first prize donated by The Grocery 
World, Pbilidelphia. 



If necessary, I say, "Oh, I can't take no 
for an answer. We need the money, or I 
wouldn't be asking for it, and I must have 
it." That usually brings it. 
I have often found with the 

TOUGHEST CUSTOMERS 

such an exhibition of confidence would open 
the purse. I remember I rode my bicycle 
one day nine miles to collect $6 from a lady. 
I went to the house, had to climb way up 
the side of the hill among the vineyards to 
get there. She " hadn't the money and 
couldn't pay it," she said. " Well, now I 
have ridden all this distance because we are 
pushed for money. This is long past due, 
but you have always been a good customer. 
Now, if it is not possible to pay all of it to- 
day, I would like to have you pay part of 
it, anyway, then try and pay the balance the 
first of the month." She gave me the only 
dollar she had in the house. 
I remember 

A NOTORIOUS HARD PAY 

customer. I had presented the bill to her 
time after time. She was always ready 
with a promise. I had presented the bill for 
the twentieth time, I guess, and she would 
say, " I'll pay that on Saturday, this week, 
sure." Right before her I jotted her own 
words down on the bill. Saturday morning 
I dropped it in the post office. When she 
got her mail she came direct to the store, 
with fire in her eye. I said as little as 
possible, and she went out. In about an 
hour she returned, smiling and good 
natured, with the money, and settled. 

I have been offered a $5 bill in payment 
for a small purchase, and would say to the 
customer, * ' I just took a dollar extra out, 
and here's a receipt to apply on that old 
account." 

One customer (a lady) I always threatened 
to sue, and usually did place in justice's 
hands before she would pay. Then she 
would walk into the store with his letter, 
with the remark, "I don't care about such 
things," and settle. As a rule, she would 
get some things charged before she left the 
store. 

Some people do not like to have a bill 
presented to them, others do not like to have 
one mailed to them. Hardly two can be 
handled alike. Great tact and patience are 
necessary. I always make a note of the 
promises, and am always on deck again at 
the exact time. I never combat a person 
when making a collection, though it is often 
necessary to be firm. 

I have often made arrangements for 

SMALL WEEKLY PAYMENTS 

(sometimes as low as 25c), and then always 
go after it if it is not brought in. I always 



expect, and so impress it on the customer's 
mind, an account to be paid when it is 
promised. Often, such an attitude will 
bring the money forth, without recourse to 
anything further, even after the customer 
has put in a plea to put off the payment. 
That attitude, with cheerfulness towards the 
customer, will work wonders, and will pre- 
serve the good-will and patronage of I hK 
I have found that a scheme that collects 
an account from a customer once will not 
often do it the second time. At one time, I 
had three printed letters, reading something 

as follows : 

No. 1. 
Smethport, Pa 



Mr. 



Your account, amounting to $ is long past due. 

Kindly oblige with an early settlement. 

Yours truly, 

F. H. Hendryx. 



No. 2. 
Smethport, Pa 



Mr. 



Your account, with interest, now amounts to $ .... 
Unless settlement is made within 10 days from the date of 
this letter it will be placed with the National Collecting 
Agency for collection. Your immediate attention will save 
costs being added. 

Yours truly, 

F. H. Hendryx. 

No. 3. 

Office of 

The National Collection Agency. 



Mr. 



Your account of $ .... , due , at , has been 

placed in our hands for collection. If attended to at once 
costs will be saved. If not, we will proceed to collect by 
law. 

National Collection Agency. 

No. 2 was usually sent out a month after 
No. 1, and No. 3 ten days later if the 
account was not paid. Often No. 1 is 
sufficient, but where it is not, usually No. 2 
will bring the delinquent to time. If, how- 
ever, No. 3 has to be sent, it will bring the 
required settlement unless the account is 
worthless. There's but little use of following 
it up further unless the parties are worth 
property, when, of course, it can be col- 
lected. This plan, however, was used only 
on the tougher class. It was apt to provoke 
customers ; serious trouble from this score, 
however, may be avoided by tact in hand- 
ling the customers as they settle. 

Rubber stamps, with the words, " Please 
call," " This account is past due. A settle- 
ment is requested," " If not paid by 

this account will be placed for collection," 
have been found effective. They must be 
used with system, however, to make them" 
effective. No. 1 should be first used, then 
No. 2 and No. 3. 

A record of the date the stamp is used 
should be placed on the books, so it shall 
not be used again on the same party's 
account. Of course, the wording might be 
changed, or any number of others used. 
They should be a progressive series of 
wording, each one a little stronger in tone 
than the preceding one. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






THE 

WATSON 

FOSTER 

COMPANY 



LIMITED 






WE DO NOT PROPOSE 
TO REST UPON THE 
HONOR OF A .- .• .« 
SUCCESSFUL PAST.- .• 



V V V V V 



BUT HAVE RATHER 
REDOUBLED OUR .- .• 
EFFORTS TO MAKE 
THE SEASON OF 1900 1 



v v > v v 



NOT ONLY A .• .• .• 
COMMERCIAL BUT.- • 
AN ARTISTIC SUCCESS 
IN YOUR ESTIMATION 



V Y Y Y Y 



THE RESULT IS .• .• 
A LONG LINE OF .• .• 
EFFECTIVE STYLES IN 
EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS 



V Y Y V V 



OUR TRAVELERS WILL 
CALL IN JULY. AND 
WE HOPE TO SECURE 
YOUR ORDER ON THE 
STRENGTH OF MERIT 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



NEW BUILDINGS FOR MONTREAL. 

ST. CATHERINE STREET, the retail 
street of which Montreal is so proud, 
is to have another fine business block, 
the plans of which have already been pre- 
pared by Howard Calton Stone. Hon. 
Geo. W. Stephens, the owner, expects the 
building will be completed before the end of 
the year. The new block, which has already 
been begun, will have a frontage on the 
south side of St. Catherine west, between 
Mountain and Drummond, of 120 feet, with 
a depth of 90 feet or more. There will be 
three storeys and a basement, and the dis- 
tance from sidewalk to cornice will be 52 
feet. New Brunswick sandstone will be the 
material employed. The proposed block 
will be divided into four stores, each having 
a width of 30 feet, and the whole will be 
known as the Empire Building. 

Another fine new building is to be erected 
in Montreal for Mr. J. Auld, who will use it 
for manufacturing purposes. Mr. A. F. 
Dunlop has just completed the design. 
This new edifice will extend north from 
Vitre street, 150 feet, taking in the block 
bounded by Chenneville, St. George and 
Vitre, having a frontage on the last-named 
street of 96 feet. The block will be five 
storeys high, the first being built of Montreal 
limestone, while the upper part is to be con- 
structed of brick. It is the idea of the 
architect to have the building completed by 
May 1. 

SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

A TWO-STOREY building for stores 
and offices is about to be built in 
Phoenix, B.C., by Graves & 
Williams. The contract price is about 
$5,000. 

A new Anglican church is being erected 
in Hull, Que. 

Percy Black is building a residence at 
Amherst, N.S. 

A new Presbyterian church is being built 
at Botany, Ont. 

A new Presbyterian church is being erected 
in Westmount, Que. 

Thos. S. Moore is building a large tene- 
ment in Amherst. N.S. 

T. Gregg is building a residence in Ed- 
monton, N.W.T., to cost about $1,800. 

C. Gruner is building two brick residences 
in Edmonton, N.W.T. ; to cost $1,000 each. 

A new building for The Northern Star 
office, Parry Sound, Ont., is being erected. 

Residences are being built in Amherst, 



N.S., by Wm. Kenny, Chas. R. Smith, 
Douglass Trenholm, George McFarlane, 
and Roger Chapman. 

Viau & Lachance, Hull, Que., have been 
awarded the contract for a new church at 
St. Cunegonde, Montreal. 

New buildings for The Ottawa Furnace 
and Foundry Co., Ottawa, are to be built 
immediately. They are to be 220 ft. long 
and two storeys high; cost, about $6, 000. 

A building for a furniture factory will 
shortly be built in Owen Sound, Ont. The 
main building will be three storeys high, and, 
in addition, a drying kiln and boiler house 
will be built. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Riopelle & Lafranc, plumbers, Montreal, 
have dissolved. 



TRADE CHAT. 



THE Grey and Bruce Portland Cement 
Co. , have placed orders for their plant 
with the Krupp Co., of Germany, 
and Vulcan Iron Works Co., of Pennsyl- 
vania, U.S. The machinery is for delivery 
in about 10 weeks. The rotary system will 
be adopted. 

Tenders are issued calling for the pur- 
chase of the C.P.R. Co.'s saw-mill at Coal 
Creek, B.C., by James Oaburne, general 
superintendent, Winnipeg. 

The new factory to be established at 
Napanee, Ont., will shortly be in operation. 
It will turn out mining machinery, and make 
and repair engines, boilers, etc. 

The Ottawa Furnace and Foundry Co., 
who were burned out in the late fire, are 
rebuil di ng on a larger scale. About $15, 000 
will be expended in fitting up the foundry, 
which, when in operation, will give employ- 
ment to 60 men. 

The Dominion Coal Co., C.B., are unable 
to supply the demands made upon them, on 
account of the difficulty in getting men to 
work in the mines at even higher prices 
than usual. The steel works at Sydney are 
taking all their former employes. 

At the meeting of the executive com- 
mittee of the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association, August 8, the following firms 
weie elected to membership : St. Croix Safe 
Co., Halifax ; Stevens Manufacturing Co., 
London; Grip Printing and Publishing Co., 
The W. R. Brock Co., Limited, and Pease 
Furnace Co., Toronto. 



FIGURING DISCOUNTS QUICKLY. 

THE following table clipped from an 
exchange will be found useful to b^rr 1 " 1 
buyer and seller. Whatever discounts 
are employed, and this is in nearly all cases 
where goods are bought through the travel- 
ing salesman or direct from the large jobber, 
much time is spent in figuring up the 
discount. This little table will save time 

and trouble : 

Per cent. off. 

10 and 5 off equals 14^ 

15 and 5 off equals 19^ 

20 and 5 off equals 24 

20 and 10 off equals 28 

25 and 5 off equals 28^ 

25 and 10 off equals 32 y z 

25, 10 and 5 off equals 35^ 

30 and 5 off equals 32^ 

30 and 10 off equals 37 

30, 10 and 5 off equals 40 1-7 

35 and 5 off equals 38^ 

35 and 10 off equals 41 yi 

35, 10 and 5 off equals 44 2-5 

40 and 5 off equals 43 

40 and 10 off equals 46 

40, 10 and 5 off equals 48 7-10 

45 and 5 off equals 47^ 

45 and 10 off equals 51^ 

45, 10 and 5 off equals 53 39-40 

50 and 5 off equals 52^ 

50 and 10 off equals 55 

50, 10 and 5 off equals 59^ 

55 and 5 off equals 57^ 

55 and 10 off equals 59^ 

55. 10 and 5 off equals 61^ 

60 and 5 off equals 62 

60 and 10 off equals 6 \. 

60, 10 and 5 off equals 65 4- 5 

65 and 5 off equals 66^ 

65 and 10 off equals 68^ 

65, 10 and 5 off equals 71 13-40 

70 and 5 off equals 7 1 >i 

70 and 10 off equals 73 

70, 10 and 5 off equals 74 7-26 

Example : Jones buys a bill of goods at 
40, 10 and 5 per cent, from list price ; list 
value, $300. 

40, 10 and 5 off equals 48 7-10 

$300 x .487 equals $146.10 
$300— $146. 10 equals $153.90 

Jones, therefore, pays $153.90 for the 
goods. 

The following building permits have been 
issued during the past week in Toronto \ 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 
one-storey brick church, 21 Camden street, 
$2,500; Grand Trunk Railway, one-storey 
brick and stone passenger station, Queen 
street east, near De Grassi street, $2,800; 
Separate School Board, two-storey brick 
and stone school, on Edwin avenue, near 
Royce street, $8,000 ; A. Axworthy, pair 
of semi - detached dwellings, Lansdowne 
avenue, $2,000. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLUMBING 



Recommendation 






A Kttisfied customer the kind iimt 
win come again la obtained i>> tr<x>ti work 
iiud good goods. 

The J. M. T. Cushion-Disc Faucet 
Is a good me. Made In the different varieties 
tor Bath, Basin, sink and Laundry Baa » 
double « ashAr, prevents bamrnering, unique 

In design, An advertisement tor the pi ber 

who uses them, The trade supplied i>> 



The Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co. 



TORONTO. 



Limited. 




HOT WATER 
INSTANTLY, 

NiGHT OR DAY. 

Boiling Water 
in a Minute. 
Hot Bath When Wanted 



EWART'S 

"LIGHTNING" 
GEYSER 

FOR GAS OR OIL. 

346 EUSTON ROAD, 
LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Illustrated Price List Free. 



ftvilO 1\>PAV <HrTrJ, 
LUifM A fiflr*] anp 




•S8f» 



DO YOU? 

tufi/erusemen t- 
•*• in the «f» 

Tof^OrJ-fO 

uiUl bring you, 
tenders/ram tM 
If est contractor*. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 



CANADIAN PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU, 

5C5 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE 

Telephone Main 1255. 
26 Front St. West, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers o< 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 




KNOX HENRY 



Ht 



Room 220'/, Board of Trad*. MONTREAL. 
8PECIALTIE8 C Hrand Bon 

BolM .Null Oo. 

BOLT8 Tire and Htove KIvpIh ol all kinds Clial- 
crafl Hcrew Oo. 

BRA88 GOODS Bum GMtor Oo., Limited, hu 

mlugbam, Kng. 



Berlin Felt Boot Co. 



BERLIN, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Guaranteed 
BEST and 
CHEAPEST 
in the 
market. 



HAIR FELT 



Hade in 
1/2 IJTCH 
3/4 " 
1 " 



For Water and Steam Pipe Covering. 

We keep a Large Stock to make Prompt Shipments. 



AS GOOD AS THE 
BEST, AND BETTER 
THAN MOST. 



The Bailey 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, CAN. 




Dominion Pattern 

Cow Tie * Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are well 
shown in the illustration. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, with prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animal's foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section , 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern. 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the Stal 
is now rapidly coming in favor in C&nad 
short link, handsome appearance and smootl 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck— i 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties. 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, 

ONT. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



OXFORD FLORENCE STOVE. 

THE stove shown in the illustration is a 
production of The Gurney Foundry 
Co., Limited, Toronto. It is called 
the Oxford hot blast, air-tight " Florence," 
made to burn hard or soft coal, slack, lignite 
or coke. The special features claimed for 
this stove are many. Among them may be 
mentioned the unusually large base, cast in 
one piece, which permits the use of a larger 
ashpan than in other stoves ; the base is 
hot, and warms the floor better than a base- 
burner ; by means of the hot blast attach- 
ment the cold air is taken in at the rear of 
the fire-pot and the hot air is discharged in 
a circle at the top of the fire-pot, thus con- 




member that the interior of your window 
must be light. If your window is darker 
than the street the glass acts as a mirror, re- 
flecting everything on the opposite side of the 
street. If the sun shines on your window 
and the opposite side of the street is dark, 
there will be no reflection in your picture. If 
there is a street or an open space before 
your window, it will be almost impossible to 
get a picture of it during the day. 

The best results, in nearly every case, are 
obtained at night by electric light. See that 
the lights, while flooding the window with 
light, are themselves hidden from the 
street by reflectors. If you have a good 
lens, from 20 to 30 seconds is sufficient 
exposure. A lens less rapid will 
require longer exposure. The size 
of diaphragm also counts. The 
smaller the diaphram, the more 
time is required, but the smaller 
diaphragm also gives sharpness 
and detail to the picture and then 
passers-by can walk between the 
camera and window, without in- 
juring the plate, provided they 
dont stop short. The time required 
is also influenced by the rapidity 
of the plate. The three things to 
be considered are : Lens, plate and 
diaphragm. By keeping these 
important items of information in 
mind, any photographer can get a 
good picture of a window display. 



suming all the gases. The stove, as can be 
seen, is artistically finished with carvings 
and nickel. In the circular which the 
manufacturers are sending out, prices, di- 
rections and a full description of this stove 
are given. 

PHOTOGRAPHING WINDOW 
DISPLAYS. 

In taking a photo of a window display, the 
best results can be obtained by getting it done 
early in the morning or when it is lit up at 
night. A good time to get a picture is about 6 
o'clock in the morning on a clear day. The 
light at that time is good and strong and a 
good picture will usually be the result. Re- 



CROPS IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

A despatch from Hartland, 
Carleton county, N.B., says : 
"The farmers have commenced 
haying. It is rumored that the 
Jacksonville farmers are paying 
extraordinary wages to the hay- 
makers, much to the chagrin of the 
farmers on the east side of the 
river, and are offering to cover 
loss of time caused by dark or 
rainy weather. The crops pro- 
mise good. Hay is reported to be 
an average. Oats and wheat are 
late, owing to the wet weather. Potatoes will 
be an average if the weather continues favor- 
able. Apples, especially the New Bruns- 
wickers, will be more than an average. 
Shipments of this fruit during the past years 
have been mostly to Madawaska county, 
where they seem to be in great demand. 

"The blueberry season is at hand, but 
report has it that shipments will be lighter 
than a year ago, as most of the produce 
will be required for local consumption." 



New York capitalists are trying to buy 
eight square miles of coal area near Sydney, 
N.S., but so far have been unsuccessful. 



THE 

;anad^ paint 



P anada P; 





[ 




sues 



are superior to all others. 

Every original package is closed with a 
brass seal. The word "AMBERITE" is regis- 
tered and the label is copyrighted. For prices 
see catalogue, pages 40, 41 and 42. 



Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 



Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 
Amber 



te Finest Wearing Body. Varnish 
te FinestOne-Coat Body . . Varnish 
te Finest Elastic Gearing . . Varnish 
te Fine Medium Gearing. .Varnish 
te Medium Finishing. . . .Varnish 
te Finest Pale Hard 

ibbing Varnish 

te Fine Medium Rubbing Varnish 
te Best Black Rubbing . .Varnish 
te Best Elastic Carriage . . Varnish 
te Fine Medium Carriage . .Varnish 
te Pale Coach Gold Size .... Japan 

te Coach Brown Japan 

te Coach Black Japan 

te Interior Varnish 

te Exterior Varnish 

te Pale Church Oak Varnish 

te Oil Finish 

te Hard-wood Floor Finish 

te Piano Varnish 

te Organ Varnish 



Sold Proprietors and Makers : 




cot 



MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Koureaenting British and American manufacturera ot 
Tinpialen.TiuuedUhoeu, Terne Platen, Canada Platen, Gal- 
vanized Sheet*, Imitation KunaiaSheeta, Black Sheets— Iron 
ami Steel — Hoops and Bands, Proved Coil Chain, Brass and 
Copper Sheets, Norway Iron and Steel, Wheelbarrows,etc. 




VanTuylSFairbank 



Petrolla, Ont . 
Headquarters for . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 

Pumps, Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools. Cables, etc. 






0/>±yCCC<vCCOt 



COOPER PATENT ELBOWS 

Bright and Common. 




E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

Sole Manufacturers 
HAMILTON, ONT. 






"JARDINE" 

TIRE UPSETTERS 
WILL UPSET TIRES 

Some machines sold as Upsetters will not. 
• Perhaps you make as much money on the 
sale of a useless Upsetter as on a good 
one, but your customer does not. He 
don't want a machine because It Is called 
an Upsetter he wants a machine to upset 
ttres. Sell him one of ours. 

IT PAYS TO SELL THE BEST TOOLS 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




B. B. Wrought Ornamental 
Pipe Straps. 

(r.i ented) 
MADE ALSO IN MALLEABLE IRON. 

These are a distinct advance over the old plain snaps, being much Stronger and 
neater. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

BERGER BROS. CO. 



Fnciory at 
(iertnantown Junction. 



Tinners' and Roofers' Supplies, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Office and Stores, 
231 and 237 Aith Street. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Babbitt Metals . . . 
Tinners' and Plumbers' Solder 
Ingot Brass, etc. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

Pig Tin, Pig Lead 
Ingot Copper . . 
Antimony, etc. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. ^liSf^. 



This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, shspjssu !!!- 




STEVENS RIFLES 




THE FAVORITE 

is made In three calibres 

22, 25 and 32 Rim Fire 

and is the best low-priced rifle made. Highest quality of work 
Accuracy guaranteed. Weight, 4H lbs. 



Send for our complete catalogue. 



No. 17, Plain Sights— List $ 8.00 
No. 18, Target Sights— " 11.50 
No. 19, Lyman Sights— " 12.00 



J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO. 



For Sale by All Leading Canadian Jobbers 
At Trade Discounts. 



P.O. Box 215, CHICOPEE FALLS, 
MASS., 



U.S.A. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, -white and colored, Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jut*, Hemp and Flax Twine*. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE IVER JOHNSON GETS IT. 

Under ihe new rules, there is, during each 
•ea on, only one championship race at each 
dis'ance, %, %, yi, i-mile, 2-miles and 5- 
miles, and the winner is considered champ- 
ion at that distance. 

The % ■ mile championship race was run at 
Buffalo, N.Y., on July 26, and Major 
Taylor, the i-mile champion of the world, 
brought his Iver Johnson wheel over the 
tape first, and becomes, therefore, the yi- 
mile champion. 

The colored boy is riding in grand form 
and looks forward to securing the champion- 
ships at the other distances. 



A NEW MANAGER. 

Mr. R. D. Munro, who for the past 11 
years has been practical assistant to his 
father, R. Munro, the managing-director of 
The Canada Paint Co., Limited, has taken 
the position of manager of The British- 
American Paint Co., Victoria, B.C. He 
succeeds W. T. Andrews, who is now no 
longer connected with the company. 



1000-Mile 
Axle Grease 



IS THE 
BEST 



\ 



Put up in 1-lb. boxes and 
3, 5 and 10-lb. pails. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST. 



The Campbell Mfg. Co. 



FORT ERIE, ONTARIO. 



THE VITAL PART 




of an oil tank is 
the valves in the 
pump. 

BOWSER 



3 



BOWSER OIL TANKS 

pump and measure accurate Imperial 
Gallons, Half-Gallons and Quarts at 
every stroke. Catalogue free. 

S. F. BOWSER & CO., 

P. 0. Box 564, TORONTO. 
Factory: FORT W YNE. IND. 



Measure 

Self- 
Measur- 
ing 

OIL 
TANKS 

are equipped 
with 

Steel Ball 
Cage Valves 

The only valves 
ever invented that 
hold kerosene oil 
indefinitely. The 
balls in these 
valves are guaran- 
teed to us not to 
vary one-ten-thous- 
andth part of an 
inch from a perfect 
sphere. No flat 
valves in ours. 
They won't hold. 
Our valves will hold 
oil "till the cows 
come home." Do you 
want an oil tank 
that you can rely 
upon to measure 
accurately all the 
time? The BOW- 
SER tank will do 
it. 



EXTENDED 
INSURANCE. 



One of the many liberal features embodied in the 
UNCONDITIONAL ACCUMULATIVE POLICY 

issued by the 

Confederation 
Life Association. 

HEAD OFFICE-TORONTO. 



is the provision for Extended Insurance. After three full annual premiums 
have been paid, the insured is entitled to Extended Insurance for the ful. 
amount of the policy for a term of years definitely stated therein. Paid-up 
and Cash Values also guaranteed. 

Rates and full information sent on application to the Head Office, To* 
ronto, or to any of the association's agents. f 



W. C Macdonald, 



Actuary. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

Managing Director 



SEND for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthly Machinery Register, containing over 
5,000 entries of new and second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established and most successful medium in the world Established 25 years for the pur- 
pose of introducing those who have machinery for sale, to those who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, alt over the world, and is used for con- 
tinual reference by a large number of firms. It is consequently a most valuable advertis- 
ing medium for all engineers and manufacturers. Subscription, 6s. per annum, price per 
copy 6d. Sole Proprietor, Chas. D. Phillips, M.I.M.E., Newport, Mon., England. 
Telegraphic address, "Machinery, Newport, Mon." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






U 



JJ 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
res, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
rstrid" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writs for Prices to Sales Agents : 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture^^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CUHHENT IVIAHKET QUOTATIONS 



August 10, 1900. 
These prioeB are for Bucb qualities and 

quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 

prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is antious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desiie 
is to make it perfeotly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 36 37 

traits 36 37 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.8., equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.C., usual sizes $7 00 

IX., " 8 50 

„ I-X.X., " 10 00 

Famous — 

IX 8 51 

I.X.X 9 50 

Raven & Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 25 

IX., " 6 25 

I.X.X. " 7 25 

l.XXX., " 8 25 

D.C.,12%xl7 4 75 

DX 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel — 

I.C., usual sizes 4 60 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 85 

20x28 9 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20i28, 112 sheets 9 50 

I.X., Terne Tin 1150 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb 
X X.,14x56,50sheet bxs ) 

" 14x60 " ( 07 07V, 
•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08V, 

" 26 " 08% 09 

" 28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Base Price 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs 2 00 2 10 

Refined " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 50 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 25 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 35 

Tire Steel 2 55 

Machinery 2 6) 

t Steel, per lb 00 00 

. A Calk Steel 2 83 

Tank Plates, 1-5 and thicker. 3 00 3 25 

Boiler Rivets 4 50 5 00 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inch 13 14 

2 " 15 16 

2% " 18 19 

3 " 19 20 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

Vi Inoh 3 25 

3-16 inoh 3 40 

H nch and thicker 3 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 gauge 3 20 

20 gauge 3 20 

22 to 24 " 3 30 

26 " 3 49 

28 " 3 60 



Canada Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 35 

Half polished 3 50 

All bright 4 U0 

Iron Pipe. 

Discounts are as follows -Black pipe, V, to 

in , 4H per cent. % io., 60 per tent. r> 4 to 

2 in., 66- : ; per cent, larger sizes, 5) and 6 

per cent. Galvanized pipe, % ' n , 40 per 

cent. % to 2 in , 50 per cent. 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G O. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge .... 4 4') 4 25 

18 to 24 gauge 4 50 4 23 4 40 4 50 
26 " 4 75 4 45 4 40 4 75 

28 " 5 00 4 70 4 60 5 00 

Less than case lots, 15c. per 100 lb. additional 
28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proo Coil, 3-16in., per 1001b 

% " .... 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 85 5 35 

% " " 4 8) 5 30 

7-16 ' " 4 50 4 9.5 

% " " ... 4 65 

% " " ... 4 20 

*i •' '• .... 4 15 

7 s " " 3 70 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 4') and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 30 and 10 p.c. 

Jack chain, irou, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B.S., ton lots 19% 20% 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cut lengths, ound.Vi to % in. 23% 25 
11 round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23% 25 

Sheet. 

Untinned ,14 oz., and light, 16 
oz., 14x48 and 14x60 23 23% 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 

pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 

cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets. ) 

4t6ft. 25 to301bs. ea., per lb 25% 

" 35 to 45 " " 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " 23% 

Boiler and T. K. Pitts. 

P ain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 

Roll and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge , 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 07 07% 

Domestio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt.casks 07 

Part casks 07X 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 05 05% 

Bar, 1 lb 06V. 

beets. 2% lbs. sq. ft., by roll 05^ 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., ' 05% 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at Tc. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toron'o. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8 -ft. lengths ists at 7% cents. 



Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1. lb. ; chilled, 87. CO 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and bal , $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% pc Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on medium and extra 
heavy, and 45 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb 

Bar half-and-half 21% 21% 

Refined 21 21% 

Wiping 20% 21 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 

quantity. The prices of other qualities ot 

solder in the market indicated by private 

brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Percwt 

Pure, Assoc, guarantee, ground in oil 

25 lb. irons 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50" 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No. 4 do 5 37% 

Monro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. k-ga, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc. 08 19 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 6 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In Vi, % and 1 gallon tina. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 135 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 120 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 19 

Colors, Dry. 
Yellow Ochre (J. C. ) bbla .... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J. F.L.S.), bbla ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 116 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (beat), per owt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt .. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, ifer cwt 175 2 00 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 25 
Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

rjolden Ochre ... 0?^ 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb 07 



Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45,1b 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying , per lb 07 

100-lb.lots, do. per lb o 08 

Putty 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or bxs 2 25 

Bulk in bbls., per 100 1 95 

Bulk in less quantities 2 10 

25-ln. tins, 4 in case 2 35 

12%-lb. tins, 8 in case 2 60 

Varnishes. 

(In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 290 330 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 3') 3 70 

Shellac, white 440 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 r.O 2 CO 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Discount— general trade discount, 50 per 
cent and lour months' time : tpecial caah 
ciscount of 3 per cent in thirty days, or 3% 
per tei t spot cash. 

The Imperia 
Varnish 4; Color 
Co's , Limited 
Klastilite Varnish, 
1 gal. can, each. 
1300, 

Granatine Floor 

Finish, per gal. 

$2.00. 

Maple L eaf 

! Coach Enamels ; 

Size 1, eOc. : 

Size 2, 35c. ; Size 

J 3, 2Cc. each. 

Linseed Oil. 

Raw. Boiled 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 86 $0 89 

5 to 9 bbls " 85 88 

Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, Quebec, 
London, Ottawa, Kingston and Gueh.h 




Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed 
2 to 4 barrels " " 



69 
68 

Toronto, Hamilton, London, Guelph, 2c. leas. 
Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb.. 10 

" small lots 1U':. Oil" 

Cod Oil, Etc 

CodOil, per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 

" Neatsfoot 

Olne. 

Common 08% ) 09 

French Medal 14 14% 

Cabinet, sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 022 030 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner IS 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
Corn 
F"lour 



EMERY 



t 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, MOtltreal. 



HARDWARE. 

A 111 null) It I on . 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Gaps. Dom., 50 and 5 per cent. 
Kim Fire Piatol, dia. 45 p. o., Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Rim Fire, Military, net list, Amer. 
Central Fire Piatol and Rifle, 18 p.o. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, piatol sizes, Dom- 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartr'dgea, Sporting and Mili 

tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer, 
net list. B.B. Caps, diaoount 45 per cent. 
Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grides, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. 
Brass shot Shells, 55 and 10 percent. 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-Lb. bags 70 

Beat thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Beat thick white card wads, in boxes 

of d00 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Anvils, .lb. 09 09% 
Wilkinaon k Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 

Augers. 
Gilmour'a, diacount 50 and 10 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, perdoz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 and 15 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 B 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tabs. 

Zinc 3 90 4 00 

Copper, discount 40 and 10 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

" " 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A perlb. 27 

B " 21 

" C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Bells. 
Hand. 
Brass, 60 per oent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant'8 5 50 8 00 

" Petsrboro', discount 27% per oent, 



Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, perlb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jenuings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per fross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Norway Bolls, full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, full square .... 65 
" " " 5-15 and under 60 

" " " % and larger 55 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts , square 4c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 60 

Stove Bolts 60 and 10 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 55 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dia. 37% per cent. 

Henis,No.8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 60 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 80 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised Hat 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6u per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per oent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per oent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulio 100 110 

Chalk. 
Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon , per gross 14 18 



Chisels. 

Socket. Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
Churns . 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8-~ 
No. 1, $8.50— .No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames — 20c. each lesB than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, £8 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fiitinga 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout... 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Richelieu 4 75 

Emb. Richelieu 5 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round. 14 in ; P5 

" oval,17xl4in 155 

" " 19x15 in 2 30 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 

American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 
S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

99 'A 



" 5. 



.22% 

.15 

.20 



Boynton pattern " 

Door Springs. 

Torreys Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach and Wagon, dia. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard, dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz 1 60 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 27% per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 per cent, to 60, 

10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent 
revised list. 

FRUIT PRESSES. 

Henis', per doz 3 25 3 50 

Shepard's Queen City, dis. 15 per cent. 
GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 0) 

26 to 40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 ... 4 75 .... 7 ?5 

51 to 60 5 03 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 75 .... 10 50 

81to85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 7 25 .... 14 I 

91to95 15 50 

96tol00 18 00 

101tol05 2100 

106toll0 24 00 

llltoll5 28 00 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



dis. 

1 20 

08% 

25 

2 00 

1 50 



1 25 
3 75 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Noa. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % - 

" %to% 

Leathir, 1 in., perdoz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web,— per-doz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dia. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb ... 07% 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., perlb.... 22 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 150 

Store door, per doz 1 00 

Fork 
C. 4 B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dia. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 100 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. paira 

Steel barn door 585 600 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No.